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A good writeup with the best photos yet of the 'bullseye' sight.

Your explanation of acquiring the sight is spot on, and is the most challenging part of using the pistol.
I've been experimenting with acquiring the sight in a hellfire hurry under mediocre light, and have considered some kind of stripe on the muzzle end of the slide as a point of index.
This is on hold for the moment, as I've installed a set of Durham Precision sights on a conventional 365. They are not as snag proof as the SAS, but a big improvement on OEM. The rear is both narrower and more rounded.
Unhappily, we cling to what we know, but I'll keep working on the SAS.
Moon
 
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Nice writeup and overview of the sights. Tried one, just didn't like it. I was surprised that my daughter didn't either as she likes smaller pistols. She still prefers my PPS and the LCP over the P365 and Hellcat. She's less enthusiastic about the P99c but prefers it over the P365.
 

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Well, smaller handguns aren't for everyone, and the PPS and LCP certainly feel different in the hand. I rather like the P365 just for the concealability, and that it's small enough to retire two carry pistols — the P99c AS and the Colt Mustang.
 

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Doug,
The writeup was an enjoyable read that mirrors most if not all of the observations discussed by other owners of the P365 SAS on these forums. Well done! With that in mind, you might want to fix this in the first sentence of the second bullet point of your test notes (emphasis added by me): "When chambering a round on a freshly inserted magazine with the magazine locked back, I twice experienced a failure of the slide to go fully into battery."

I think you meant slide, of course, but if you really did have the magazine locked back, I want a pic of that. Hehehehe/
 

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Well, smaller handguns aren't for everyone, and the PPS and LCP certainly feel different in the hand. I rather like the P365 just for the concealability, and that it's small enough to retire two carry pistols — the P99c AS and the Colt Mustang.

I was hopeful myself but, in the end, I'm sticking with my PPS and P99c. Merry Christmas.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I was hopeful myself but, in the end, I'm sticking with my PPS and P99c. Merry Christmas.

Nothing wrong with those choices. They're both great, and I still love the P99c AS I carried for a decade, before this handgun came along.

Merry Christmas.
 

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Longtime LCP/LCPII fan, but my enthusiasm has dimmed. No arguing they are remarkably concealable, and some versions come with better sights. But they are snappy and not pleasant to shoot, and there was a trigger failure with my LCPII.
Drifted to the G42 and now the P365 for only being a little bigger, and easier to fire accurately.
The notion of a small carry gun in a service caliber is heartening as well.
Moon
 
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I'm still proving out my P365 SAS, but I'm well on the way to switching to it as my EDC. I need to put more FMJ rounds through it -- as well as at least 200 SD rounds without any failure to feed/fire malfunctions -- before I'll feel comfortable enough with it to stake my life on it should the need ever arise. I plan to smith the trigger weight down and smooth out the break, so my prove out will be completed after that, and not beforehand.

If (hopefully 'when') the switch from my PPS Classic to the P365 SAS comes, only my pair of PPS's will be retired. My LCP will still be carried as a BUG in a back pocket (in a Recluse holster with a trigger block) …. or as a primary EDC using a VersaCarry ZeroBulk IWB setup when no other rig or means of carry will suffice (example: bathing suit and flip flops while out boating -- when there's no belt, shirt, or other cover garment worn -- requiring me to go ultra light or not carry, at all). I have a Gen1 LCP that's been heavily smithed, by the way; the 15lb P3AT springs, reduced power hammer spring, and Sweet Pea adjustable trigger did a lot to clean up the trigger ... but she's still a snappy little brute to shoot -- which is just fine for a SD scenario.

I may explore carrying the P365 SAS in a Recluse in the back pocket for those days when I don't want something on my belt; they make a holster for it (again, with trigger block). My PPS could never really disappear in my back pocket like that...
 

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In case you missed it, Frank, I posted this in the Hellcat vs Sig 365 Review - Shot both today thread:

Just looked up and read through this thread. Some really interesting perspectives.

A few notes from my recent range test of the SAS:

  • The porting flash is noticeable in a dark range for the first few times you fire; after that you no longer even notice it
  • Thus, I doubt there's that much gas being ported as to pose a hazard, even when holding the gun closely; It might even be a blessing in disguise, as if I'm holding the P365 that close then it's probably because it's within reach of the bad guy, and what little hot gas that may be coming out of those ports may be enough to discourage that hand reaching toward the muzzle
  • Inside a car I wouldn't even worry about getting gas back in my face; the gases are directed in a 45º V-pattern at the muzzle end; if my face were directly above the slide the gases would V away from me
  • The FT Bullseye sights do take some training, but I've been doing that daily just by keeping the empty P365 nearby and routinely bringing the sight to eye level and checking for alignment; I'm at the point now where I've close enough to see green even in the dark
Frank, as for your distaste for the ports, but appreciation for the SAS's smooth finish and sight, SIG just came out with a P365 SAS slide assembly, sans porting, that fits directly onto a standard P365 (they sold out within a week of introduction, so that says something, and as of today they're showing available again). Price is $249:

P365 SAS Slide Assembly

 

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Still struggling with the SAS; in good light, they are great. In lousy light, not so much.
Moon
 

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Still struggling with the SAS; in good light, they are great. In lousy light, not so much.
Moon
A gun counter guy echoed that to me when I asked him about the SAS (I ultimately ended up picking up the XL). The range I was at is dimly lit at the shooting positions and he said he has a hard time picking up those sights there. I had seen that mentioned in a couple of reviews also.
 

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The SAS is driving me more than a little crazy. With no sights to snag, it comes out of the pocket slicker'n whale snot.
In good light, the sights are absolutely deadly. In lousy light, you're down to shooting over the top of the slide.
I have a P365 with regular sights (actually, with Dawson Precision fiber optic front; not really a night sight fan); it's harder to get our of a pocket, but I'm much more confident of hitting things.
Moon
 
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The sight reminds me of the Devel custom Smith and Wesson model 39's of the 80's. Devels were also rear site only and had a "gully" sight where you aligned by equalizing the size of 3 long triangles.
 

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The SAS is driving me more than a little crazy. With no sights to snag, it comes out of the pocket slicker'n whale snot.
In good light, the sights are absolutely deadly. In lousy light, you're down to shooting over the top of the slide.
I do not normally advocate lasers for anything more than training aids, but I sometimes make exceptions for close quarter carry guns designed to be snagless and pocketed. Key to this is that such guns usually suffer in the sight department as a tradeoff for their snagless designs … and they're intended for minute-of-bad-guy accuracy at 7 yards or less, not punching one ragged hole in paper at 25 yards.

The P365 SAS is one such (obvious) case. While it's sights are great compared to, say, a Ruger LCP … they're still lackluster compared to 3 dot sights. Perhaps consider looking into CT's offering for the P365? I'm considering one, myself, by the way...

Surreal

P.S. SIG has one, too, but I've read bad things about flex in it causing point of aim shift on the laser's dot when the grip is squeezed....
 

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I do not normally advocate lasers for anything more than training aids, but I sometimes make exceptions for close quarter carry guns designed to be snagless and pocketed. Key to this is that such guns usually suffer in the sight department as a tradeoff for their snagless designs … and they're intended for minute-of-bad-guy accuracy at 7 yards or less, not punching one ragged hole in paper at 25 yards.

The P365 SAS is one such (obvious) case. While it's sights are great compared to, say, a Ruger LCP … they're still lackluster compared to 3 dot sights. Perhaps consider looking into CT's offering for the P365? I'm considering one, myself, by the way...

Surreal

P.S. SIG has one, too, but I've read bad things about flex in it causing point of aim shift on the laser's dot when the grip is squeezed....
Worth taking into account that not everyone has perfect eyesight. I wear bi-focals so getting a good front sight focus is a challenge, dots or not. With laser and red dot you have a single point of focus making for a very useful sight picture. With either red dot or laser, I am pretty sure I am shooting to the gun's capability, much more quickly, than I can with any iron sight. Lasers have the additional advantage of allowing you to accurately place shots at any eye/hand/arm/gun position.
 

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Laser and RDS are fine. At my age, RDS are a Godsend as far as accurate shooting goes.

That being said, for a defensive gun, I want to be able to shoot the gun decently without any electronic doodads.

Part of that is finding a gun that points naturally for you and has sights you can see well enough to get that "flash" sight picture.

If that's not there, I'd think twice about it as a carry gun no matter how many rounds it carries or how cool it is.

I know most of you guys know this. The newbies to shooting may not.
 

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That being said, for a defensive gun, I want to be able to shoot the gun decently without any electronic doodads.

Part of that is finding a gun that points naturally for you and has sights you can see well enough to get that "flash" sight picture.
As Bill Lewinski reported based upon his testing using trained police officers and non shooters we are screwed from the beginning even before we have drawn our firearm when the bad guy/gal is pulling theirs first. Sights become irrelevant at that point.

I also use the flash picture when practicing and I also need reading glasses if I'm using both rear and front sights for alignment. However, the large orange ball provided by the Trijicon sights makes attaining the desired flash picture quick and simple.


Rethinking Reaction Time

In one startling test, for example, a female volunteer who had never before held a firearm (simulating an inexperienced offender) was able to pull a hidden gun from her waistband and shoot at an officer in an average of 16/100 of a second. The typical officer going for his weapon in a Level I holster requires 1.5 seconds to draw and fire a sighted shot once he perceives a stimulus to act. "In 1.7 seconds, an attacker using a Glock 9mm pistol can deliver six rounds on average," Lewinski says. "Considering just reaction time alone, the officer is screwed."
 
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