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I have been watching them on the SOG website, and the price just dropped to $398 so I thought I would take a chance. I called them up and they shipped me a cyq all matching. I knew this had to be a Russian capture re-blue for that price, so I asked and they did not know. But I thought even if it was, for that price it would make a great shooter. When it arrived, sure enough it was an RC, with a big "X" stamped in front of the "P38" on the left of the slide. Also had very feint, hard to see with the naked eye import stamp. So I was happy. I dissassembled it, all looked good until I looked down the barrel, the lands and grooves were very pitted, especially at the breach end to the point that I am sure it would not of made a good seal when firing it. I would classify it as unsafe. So I called them up to complain and the lady was very nice and explained that they do not inspect the barrels, but they were happy to take it back or exchange it for a full refund. So I am only out the return shipping of about $10. So moral of the story, always inspect your surplus guns before you shoot them, don't rely on a distrubutor or retailer to do that for you.
 

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Doc: Thanks for the cautionary tale, well-told. Parties interested in obtaining a vintage P38 are far better off paying a few more dollars to get something that they'll be delighted to own, especially if they are looking for shooters. You can find some wonderful buys on often mismatched P38s that are good to go at the range. And those steel frames are a true wonder to behold, especially if your only experience with the model is the alloy-framed P1. Poke around a bit online; place a WTB on the P38 Forum: Nice shooters can be found in the $500 range that will a) make you very happy, indeed, and b) keep you occupied at the range for many hundreds of rounds.

The P38 remains an amazing piece of firearms machinery.
 

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I did recently pick up a P38 from SOG (at the higher price) and took it to the range. Fired about 40 rounds at a paper plate at 25 yards. Put all the rounds into the paper plate and most of them within a 4" circle. Not too shabby for a new to me gun.

BTW - I couldn't wait to replace the springs but that is next to do before she goes back to the range.
 

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I did recently pick up a P38 from SOG (at the higher price) and took it to the range. Fired about 40 rounds at a paper plate at 25 yards. Put all the rounds into the paper plate and most of them within a 4" circle. Not too shabby for a new to me gun.

BTW - I couldn't wait to replace the springs but that is next to do before she goes back to the range.
Doesn't sound to me like it's broke...

M
 

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another P-38 cautionary tale

i just bought a WWII P-38 that the seller said had been inspected by a gunsmith. it was my first P-38, so i figured the barrel was supposed to slide back and forth loosely when the slide was pulled back. turns out, no, the locking block and spring were missing. i shudder to think what would have happened if i'd loaded the thing and fired it. now i have a new locking block and spring from CDNN, but no earthly idea, despite studying the schematics, how they are supposed to fit together. anybody know?
 
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