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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've already shown you all the pics:

https://imgur.com/gallery/G3gntJu

So you're probably wondering how it shoots, too.



Double action only trigger pull of 8.8 pounds. REALLY girthy grip. Weighs about a ton and holds 8+1 rounds of .45ACP. When I say +1, I mean it's easy to load the mag up and release the slide, and stuff another round into the magazine. But then re-inserting the mag into the pistol with the slide already forward gets a bit more difficult. I have the same issue with the MR9. Both require some firm yet gentle pressure to +1 load them.

The grip is definitely nothing for small girly hands, but you can get both a decent two-handed thumbs forward grip on it, with the weak thumb resting on the slide release lever; as well as a very nice one-handed grip.

The sights are three white dots, with the rear sight notch funnel shaped, which forces your eyes to focus on the front sight and makes sight picture acquisition instantaneous.

The safety is for some reason located at the rear of the slide. Click to the left for F, and to the right for S. The travel of the lever into either direction is not as obvious or "generous" as one would think. It's really just a small click.

Click it off, to F, it points naturally and the sights align themselves, and for some strange reason, the 8.8 lbs of DAO trigger pull don't seem nearly as bad as the mere 8.5 on that KelTec P11 I used to have. You still remain on target when squishing the trigger. Here's where the ergonomic grip and the two tons of weight really help. I somehow even managed to double tap it a few times.

Now the interesting part is, with my 1911, I can really feel it push back into my hand, and, when shooting one-handed, how it twists and wants to go up.
None of that with the Mauser. All those impulses go elsewhere (rotating barrel plus heavy weight). The gun doesn't go up, it doesn't twist, just little bit of push straight back, and you remain right on target and even when double-tapping, both rounds go into the same exact hole. Probably doesn't hurt that you really have to strangle that girthy grip, i.e. you're forced to have a perfect grip on it.

You could should that pistol all day and only ever need those little dime sized target stickers to cover up your holes, LOL. Except eventually your trigger finger does get a little tired.

Overall, fun gun. Accurate, punchy, and amusing. I do and I don't see why the principle never took off, except with the Beretta PX4.



And it's a great example of a legislation-driven gun, like the PPK/S, seeing how it was designed and made during the AWB '94. Low capacity, large caliber, and CCW licenses weren't as big of a thing yet as nowadays, thus also heavy a.f. and a large foot print. It really serves no purpose in today's world.

It's even rarer than those super common Walther P5's ;) , and the firearm closest in shape and dimensions to it would be the Sig M11:



Except that one costs about $1,000 more than what I paid for the M2, LOL.
 

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Thanks for the great review Kar ! I've always been a little curious about the M2 as I have a fondness for Mauser pistols. There's just not much info out there on it. Even over on the Mauserguns.com forum the M2 subforum has no activity.

Do you mind showing a picture of it field stripped ?
 

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Another work-around in the firearms industry.
Hammer or striker fired?

You have great pictures...could you manage one of that safety?
Thanks,
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
The Sig/Mauser M2 is striker fired, no hammer. And if you go to the second line in my post up there, and click on that link, I have a bunch of pictures posted there.

Safety:



I'll do one of all the bits and pieces in a pile maybe tomorrow.
 

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Congratulations on a great purchase. Definitely a cool gun you just don't see everyday.

I remember seeing them around when they first came out and being intrigued. They did not stick around very long. I'm curious if something happened with the Sig/Mauser relationship that caused Sig to punt on the whole affair.

You mentioned the PX4 as a rotating barrel design. The Grand Power pistol from Slovakia I believe also uses a variation on the system. I've never shot one but they seem to be well regarded.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I remember seeing them around when they first came out and being intrigued. They did not stick around very long. I'm curious if something happened with the Sig/Mauser relationship that caused Sig to punt on the whole affair.
The thing is, the military division of Mauser got sold off to Rheinmetall, and the civilian branch bought by the SigArms guys who still make hunting rifles and such under the Mauser name. But the pistol was meant to be a budget Sig. Which is strategy that floundered. I mean who but a few even know the Mauser name these days. In the US anyway, for which this handgun was meant.
As soon as the AWB expired and federal magazine capacity restrictions went away, so did this weird pistol. As did the Mauser name as applied to handguns.

Kinda like with the Borgward brand revival. Who but a very few enthusiasts would even know that name, much less be interested in a revival of the brand in name only. Hmmm. That WOULD be interesting details for a parallel universe, like in The Man in the High Castle or the current Wolfenstein games. Current models of Borgwards and Mauser pistols...
 

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The Mauser M2 was reviewed in the March 2000 American Rifleman. Apparently it was originally developed by Mauser Oberndorf, which sold off its small arms business to SIG in Switzerland in 1999. Evidently the deal included this design. SIG's German subsidiary, J.P. Sauer, and its American branch SIGArms, Inc. became the conduit for exporting and marketing this gun in the USA. It's not clear to me exactly where this gun was actually made, though I have a dim recollection that it was mostly produced somewhere in eastern Europe and was finished and proofed at Eckernforde.

In any event, when SIG sold its own small arms business only a few years later, the new owners of SIG/Sauer chose to let this project die.

What strikes me most is its resemblance to the Stoner-designed (but much-modified) Colt 2000, a contemporary rotating-barrel design.

M

CORRECTION: My "dim recollection" above was mistaken. It was the Hungarian-made FEG 9mm Para pistols (the R-9 and also the High Power clones) that were marketed in the USA circa 1992 under the Mauser name. The importer was Precision Imports Inc. in San Antonio.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Seems a little high, considering the company has pretty much disavowed the gun and there will be no support or parts for it from Sig, ever. See if you can get it for $375.
 

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I agree. Especially since I don鈥檛 foresee shooting it much. I鈥檓 not a big fan of 40 cal, and just can鈥檛 seem to get enough of shooting my PPQ & PPS

If they let it go under $400 it might be worth sticking it in the back of the safe though.
 
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