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Discussion Starter #1
I came across a photo posted by jontheturboguy P99QA Detail strip guide. In one of the pictures posted with his guide (linked below), there is some sort of wear on about 3/4 of the way to the rear portion of the black plastic rail on the right side of gun. I believe that this part is the Sear Group Assembly. It is almost directly above his first knuckle of the thumb. Can anyone tell me what that is? It is normal or indicative of wear? Thank you in advance for your insight and considerations. Herman.

 

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In my P99 / PPQ comparison I have a photo of three similar pistols. The one on the left is a first gen P99 AS with easily 15,000 rounds through it. The center is a third generation with about 3,000 rounds, and the one on the right a brand new PPQ with zero rounds through it. The sear blocks are almost (but not quite) identical. I don't see the wear you mentioned on any of mine. But then again, I don't see serious wear on yours either.

 

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Prince Herman, keep in mind that the sear block in the photo from that thread, is from a P99 QA, not a P99 AS, so they will be different due to the different trigger mechanisms.

Do you have an AS or a QA?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thank you both for your quick replies. I am ashamed to say that I don't know the trigger configuration that I have and I don't know difference among the designations, either. I thought that I bought the Anti-Stress trigger system. Be that as it may, I see the same "point of interest" in both jontheturboguy's photo of the 99QA and Iron Man's photo of the a first gen P99 AS (on the left). It is there along the right side of the spring (nearer its rear-most coils). It is more obvious (though not necessarily more pronounced) in Iron Man's photo than in jontheturboguy's photo. It looks like a little strip [vaguely triangular in shape) of grey or white exposed in the sear assembly body. Maybe it is not wear but I am curious what it is. Do you see what I am referring to? I apologize that I don't have the capability to highlight the point of interest in the photos. Thank you for your input and guidance, Herm.
P.S. by comparison to Iron Man's photos, mine is an AS. I have add my photo with indicators; I hope this helps clarify what I am poorly trying to describe. Thank you.



 

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My P99 has that as well. I think all of them are like this, and I think it has something to do with how the polymer was molded. I wouldn't worry about it.
 

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I am ashamed to say that I don't know the trigger configuration that I have and I don't know difference among the designations, either. I thought that I bought the Anti-Stress trigger system.
It should be on the slide either an AS or a QA after the P99. Another way to quickly tell is the AS has a long decocker button on the slide while the QA has a small decocker button.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It should be on the slide either an AS or a QA after the P99. Another way to quickly tell is the AS has a long decocker button on the slide while the QA has a small decocker button.
I must confess: mine is an S&W99 in .45; it has the long decocking button on the slide. Thank you, again.
 

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Well, truth be told, the frame (the assembly in question) is stamped Walther on one side and made in Germany on the other side. :)
Sorry, couldn't resist it. I have never seen an SW99 in .45 ACP. I would imagine there would be a huge wear difference. Notice the word "imagine" in that statement. I am not speaking from experience.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Actually, it is remarkably tame in .45. Similarly, I can only imagine that the wear would be expected to be more than in 9mm yet less than in the .40. I was able to meet a factory smith at a local "S&W/Walther Day" (I didn't make that up; they call it that) and he tweaked the trigger for me, early-on. Unlike jontheturboguy's comprehensive five step process: (polishing the trigger pin; buffing the rough edges on the trigger's finger pad; buffing the transfer arm; edging-off the striker's plastic retaining lugs and; polishing the striker), the factory smith simply took a file to the rear of the trigger (where it enters the frame when pressed); I cringed; but he smoothed things out fairly well with only a few file strokes. Apparently, this is a quick method developed for and used on their M&P's. It is nothing I would do in view of a customer but it was effective. Of course, if it is so simple, why don't they do it as part of pre-shipment Q.A.?!
 
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