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This could possibly be the stupidest question of all time, but I'll venture forth regardless.
What is up with the swirls of black in the vintage chocolate brown colored stocks on PPK's? Was it to simulate some particular type of wood? Some stocks you can barely see it and some it's quite pronounced. Just curious of anyone knows the history of it...
 

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I think you're right. There have been lots of companies that have produced synthetic stocks, trying their best to make them look like really fancy wood.
As a matter of interest, I knew of a DPW worker who would paint metal file cabinets in wood grain tones to match the real woodwork in an office. Didn't fool anybody, but didn't look too bad, either.
 

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Interesting...
I was of the impression that it was part of the bakelite process but now that I think of it, it would make sense they might have mixed the plastic to simulate wood finish.
 

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I seem to recall that wood cellulose was added to the Bakelite resin as an extender to lower costs more than as a cosmetic additive, but that might be exactly backward. IIRC, by the end of WWII, the Bakelite became too valuable (expensive) to use for grips, so the simple pressed-wood grips were used, at least on the Walthers.
 

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What is up with the swirls of black in the vintage chocolate brown colored stocks on PPK's? Was it to simulate some particular type of wood?
I think that's your answer. My Remington Nylon 66 is the Mohave Brown version. Even right in front of me it looks like a highly polished wood stock.
 
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