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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know the trick to get the barrel locking spring (takedown spring) back in properly?

It is like it is not seating close enough to the front of the gun. It looks so simple but I have tried for hours and it just will not go back together correctly.

Thanks
 

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Which part number are you referring to.....28.1 or 28.2? The actual spring simply drops down in the position shown in the parts diagram. If, however, you are referring to the barrel lock that part can be a pain to reinstall. There's an alignment tab on the horizontal bar that fits into a slot. Getting the tab into place and simultaneously depressing the spring while inserting the part can be difficult. The "ears" are a bit too long and the spring may not depress sufficiently to allow the ear to pass over it. I had to file mine slightly to clear the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
28.1 the spring itself. It drops right in but seems to be too far towards the back of the gun and has no spring tension on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks I saw that video. Wasn’t sure if the M2 is the same. I have it in the right place but it just isn’t working. I have a new spring coming. Maybe that is all it will take.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Which part number are you referring to.....28.1 or 28.2? The actual spring simply drops down in the position shown in the parts diagram. If, however, you are referring to the barrel lock that part can be a pain to reinstall. There's an alignment tab on the horizontal bar that fits into a slot. Getting the tab into place and simultaneously depressing the spring while inserting the part can be difficult. The "ears" are a bit too long and the spring may not depress sufficiently to allow the ear to pass over it. I had to file mine slightly to clear the spring.
Finally got it back together. I found the ears on the barrel lock clear more easily if the metal chassis is not inserted all the way down into the plastic.
 

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I know this will sound like heresy for all of us "gun cranks" who love shooting and fiddling with our firearms, but you all may wish to consider disassembly less often than usual. It is my opinion that most handguns wear out at least as fast by excessive cleaning than shooting. I know Walther is just now beginning to consider disassembly/reassembly as a significant issue with customers. The debacle with the Ruger Mk3 was a bitter lesson for them and prompted the early deployment of the Mk4 as a solution.


I myself struggled with the CCP because of its weird design. Frankly, it didn't shoot all that well either. On the other hand, my PPQ is a dream to shoot. I'm sure Walther people will say "Well, some are hits and some are misses.":eek:
 

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I know this will sound like heresy for all of us "gun cranks" who love shooting and fiddling with our firearms, but you all may wish to consider disassembly less often than usual. It is my opinion that most handguns wear out at least as fast by excessive cleaning than shooting. :eek:

If you are talking about detail stripping and disassembly, then I agree with you. But, if you mean basic field stripping and cleaning then I totally disagree. I have for decades always field stripped and cleaned my pistols after shooting them - the same day except for one time (I cleaned them the next day). I believe in keeping all of my guns clean, but a total detailed disassembly is not needed for that.
 

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As the Ruger was mentioned I wanted to pass along a tip that helped in putting the Mark III together.The mk I, II and III were pretty much the same procedure. Except the Mark III has a magazine safety so you must put the empty magazine in place to pull the trigger to position the hammer and strut.
I have a Mark III bought new in 2007. I finally took it apart for cleaning after about 7500 rounds.
Even then the hammer was tight enough that it needs a dowel to position it.
Also to make sure the barrel is tight I need to use a mallet. Get a bigger hammer is the philosophy.
The saving grace of my Mark III is it has been totally reliable with any cci ammo. No misfeeds with any ammo . Only some duds with Remington.
 

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The saving grace of my Mark III is it has been totally reliable with any cci ammo. No misfeeds with any ammo . Only some duds with Remington.
XRing,

Have you shot any variety of Federal ammo in your MKIII? I am just curious how Federal has performed if you used it. I prefer Federal and CCI for rimfire ammo myself.
 

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To Kar98: I'm not sure Ruger sold "millions" of MkIII's but they did sell a lot. The replacement with the MkIV came very quickly and that piece is quite easy to disassemble. As far as I know, both guns are accurate and reliable. Even Walther is sensitive to customer acceptance. The M2 showed up so soon because American shooters truly disliked the platform magazine release in favor of the more traditional button.
 

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My pps m2 is the same way. The guide rod and spring do not seat tightly and lock into place. Some times I reassemble with the slide held upside down and slide the frame into it.
 

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Not that the point is worth anything but Ruger has many millions of firearms since they got started in the late 1940s. How many MkIII pistols were sold before Ruger replaced that model with the MkIV is another matter altogether.
 

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Not that the point is worth anything but Ruger has many millions of firearms since they got started in the late 1940s. How many MkIII pistols were sold before Ruger replaced that model with the MkIV is another matter altogether.
More than two million, because that's their output for one year alone. And they made the III for eight years.
 
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