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The M1 design of the sear housing and disconnector were significantly different than the M2. The M1 housing included a substantial trigger bar guide in addition to other structural elements that mandated the trigger bar be retained in a straight line with only a few millimeter offset to move into the slot on the right side of the barrel.

The M2 design had to allow for greater right to left displacement due to the redesigned disconnector. That greater displacement resulted in a much smaller and less effective trigger bar guide which is nothing more than a plastic square that is formed when the housing is extruded. My trigger bar made no contact with that "guide" until I reworked the cruciform structure by removing the left side disk. That prevented the cruciform from torqueing which forced the trigger bar to shift to the right at the rear of the sear housing and the consequential inward motion of the trigger bar into the path of the recoiling barrel.
Chandler
Did you perform that work or did you have a local gun smith .
Apparently you did.
 

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About 1800 rounds through my PPS M2 thus far, and thankfully no signs of peening:



Not sure if it makes a difference, but the PPS has only been fed a constant diet of my reduced power subsonic 115 gr. handloads since new.

Just another data point.
 

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After I read this thread I (reluctantly) checked the barrel of my BI (2018) date code PPS M2 LE and found that there is not even so much as a scratch at the location in question. I then checked the movement of the trigger bar and while it does move away from the frame during its travel, it isn't very much. I'm not quite at 500rds through my PPS just yet but I am approaching it, somewhere between 250 and 500 maybe.

FWIW my .02 is that the peening is a QC issue. Is it "normal" as the Walther smiths say? Doesn't seem so since not everyone is experiencing it. Will it be detrimental to the function of the firearms? Probably not. Either way I hate to hear Walther CS isn't handling this better.

As stated by the post above. Just another data point
 

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The ramp appears fairly benign in appearance. What does the barrel lug look like photo)?
Yeah here’s the peening pics, not as bad as some, but still worse than none. I’ve come to terms with the peening because it’s not malfunctioned. However, the marks on the right of the ramp concerns me. Looks worse in person and you can feel it when you run your nail across it. I’m more worried about it being an issue with jamming.
 

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I don't think the ramp area is being impacted by the trigger bar tab.....that's too far to the left. If the tab was moving that far we should see strike marks to the left of the current point of impact. Those marks appear to be consistent with the movement of the rounds out of the magazine and being shoved into and up the ramp into the chamber. Hopefully you will have a few other members add their thoughts.
 

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I agree about the trigger bar not making the impact. I’ve only used brass shells too which is weird they would gouge they ramp that way. Thanks for the input
 

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I agree about the trigger bar not making the impact. I’ve only used brass shells too which is weird they would gouge they ramp that way. Thanks for the input
yup, it's why I stopped recommending the PPS M2. the PPQ and the P99 (and P99c) are the only modern Walther guns I can recommend in good conscience
 

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It's not the trigger bar hitting the barrel; it's the barrel hitting the trigger bar. In recoil the barrel is loose and unsupported against random movement. Walther doesn't want to spend the money to fix it.

JMO.

M
 

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It's not the trigger bar hitting the barrel; it's the barrel hitting the trigger bar. In recoil the barrel is loose and unsupported against random movement. Walther doesn't want to spend the money to fix it.

JMO.

M
Could be both.

Notice the PPS design has the trigger bar "horn" farther forward relative to there designs such as Glock.
The alignment of the PPS trigger bar must be vericle and to the right so there is no contact with the barrel .

Glocks trigger bar has the "horn" farther back so even if it were postioned too far toward center there is no possible way to make contact.

The PPS design need better trigger bar guides and possible better barrel locking configuration.

As more PPS M2 may not have the problem and the PPS has not had the peening problem, putting in a better trigger bar guide may be the best candidate solution.

Maybe on the PPS m3.
 

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It's not the trigger bar hitting the barrel; it's the barrel hitting the trigger bar. In recoil the barrel is loose and unsupported against random movement. Walther doesn't want to spend the money to fix it.
Yes, it is the barrel that's being pushed back into the trigger bar tab. However, the barrel is not moving out of its horizontal alignment but rather the trigger bar that shifts from right to left (see photo). That shift is caused by the lack of adequate trigger bar guide force. The PPS M1 had a better trigger guide which was eliminated on the M2 when Walther redesigned the disconnector system.
 

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For comparison I am posting a Glock video which provides great detail related to the trigger operation. The Walther PPS trigger bar and sear block are virtually identical and the trigger bar design is also the same with a couple of important differences. First, I am certain the Glock trigger bar is slightly wider and stronger than the PPS bar. Also, the Glock trigger tab has a slightly different shape. If you go to the 7:24 mark in the video and watch the next 2-3 seconds you will note the Glock trigger bar has a similar right to left shift albeit less deflection than the PPS. I do not own a Glock so I am unable to provide a side-by-side comparison of the two trigger bars. I am including a photo of the PPS M2 trigger bar.

 

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So I heard back from walther after a week and this is what their wonderful service person told me: “That is where the barrel is assembled, are you have any jamming issues? Most PPSs will have a mark similar to that.” Pretty sure he didn’t even look at the issue. I sent another email circling the issue and pressing my concern more. Guess I’ll repost their response in a week or so. I truly believe this was a factory error. No brass cartridge would gouge the metal ramp like that.
3A3063D7-4C0C-4DC8-B4EE-7B69CEDB63D4.jpeg
 

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So I heard back from walther after a week and this is what their wonderful service person told me: “That is where the barrel is assembled, are you have any jamming issues? Most PPSs will have a mark similar to that.” Pretty sure he didn’t even look at the issue. I sent another email circling the issue and pressing my concern more. Guess I’ll repost their response in a week or so. I truly believe this was a factory error. No brass cartridge would gouge the metal ramp like that. View attachment 92102
Pretty much an embarrassment for Walther . These are not the droids you are looking for.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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So I got a different account after I couldn't change my username. I heard back from Walther and here is what they said:

Your PPS M2 has been evaluated by our Gunsmith and his findings are as follows. The feed ramp on the PPS M2 is different than most other guns. There are actually two metal pieces brazed together into one and then the feed ramp is cut after that process takes place. The horizontal line you can see on very far right side of ramp is where the two pieces meet up. The Gunsmith did hone on the ramp to enhance the cosmetics. However, there’s a fine line of taking away too much metal and if he goes any further it could result in feeding issues. Many of these guns exhibit the exact same appearance and it’s been like that since start of production. It presents no concern from safety, functionality, longevity, or other. I don’t recall ever seeing one of these actually break or otherwise separate. The appearance was as such when it left the factory and upon you taking possession of the gun. I can certainly understand where a person may not notice the line at first and then discover it at some point, maybe during a cleaning session. The Gunsmith test fired your gun on our range to confirm complete functionality and there were no issues found. If you ever encounter any issues as it pertains to functionality and reliability then please don’t hesitate to reach out to us. Your gun has a lifetime warranty against defects in material or workmanship and we’ll take care of any issues that may arise.

Not a bad response, but still is concerning, to me! I've attached pics of what it looked like before and after sending it in. Let me know what you think.

Feed ramp.jpg After Ramp 2.jpg
 
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