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Designs like the M&P and XD are close enough to single action that it is splitting hairs calling it something else. The XD is placed in IDPA ESP category for that reason even the stock striker has some tiny rearward movement when fired, You will find that one that has had a superlative SA Custom shop trigger job (2.5#) or a Powder River precision job at 2.5# they both have zero rearward striker movement when you pull the trigger and are 100% cocked. They also have reduced power striker springs...

Anytime you reduce friction at the striker/sear contact point you will change the feel and reduce the amount of weight required to release the striker.
You can do this by polishing the sear/striker interface or you can reduce striker spring weight or both.

Just because the PPQ looks different internally doesn't mean reducing friction will not improve the way the trigger feels when the shot breaks.
Give it up man... Arguing with the same 3 Walther super fans just results in PM's from searcher telling you to read the rules. There seems to be some good info here. Personally, I like this thread and found it helpful and have another spring on the way from a diff mfr, but trying to convince these guys to spend a dime on something is useless. They don't care, you'll never be right, etc.

You could do a before and after with them and they'd insist there's "no difference" and swapping the spring was "irrelevant" and "bogus". Guess you need to drink the kool-aid here and bash people to get to a point where you have no consequences for your actions, which is kinda sad really. I'd imagine this thread closes pretty quick, but thanks for the info in your OP. Much appreciated.
 

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HighStandard, with ALL due respect, and the same to bladeandbarrel,
you CAN change the striker spring on the PPQ, but it WILL not make one damned bit of difference. I'll bet you a box of 9mm ammo of your choice.

You know how I know?

Because I put a PPS striker spring in my PPQ, and nothing changed in the trigger. Also, because of the design of the PPQ. When you pull the slide back, the pistol is cocked. All that happens when you drop the trigger is that the FPB rises, the sear moves, and the striker comes forward to impact the primer, then the process is repeated until ammo runs out, or you quit squeezing the trigger.

It's not that we speak and suddenly things are how we say it....the drawing posted above is a visual confirmation of our words.

And a few of these guys have many thousands of rounds through their PPQ, so I'd be very inclined to believe what they say.

During a Glock's cycle, yes, the trigger movement finishes cocking the striker, and the same is also true in the PPS. However, the PPQ is a pre-cocked design, as stated, bringing the slide back accomplishes this. I don't care what the classes in the pistol shoot competitions say about the M&P and XD, we're not discussing those. I merely threw the glock reference in for comparison's sake.

You guys come in and say "oh poo and poo about my trigger, blah blah, the PPQ is gritty, but I won't listen to tried and proven advice, and I'll just replace my striker spring"

Listen kid, are you getting light primer strikes with several types of ammo?
No? Then leave the spring alone, clean and lightly lube the FBP, and go test it out.

Now, if you were talking about scratchy it feels to rack the slide, then you'd be on to something. The spring has no bearing on trigger feel.

But so what, some of these guys have only been shooting the PPQ since 2011 when it came out, I'm sure they're ignorant as to it's design, function......and how to fine tune it, in the tiny bit that needs fine tuning.
Have a nice day....my head hurts now. ;):rolleyes:
 

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You could do a before and after with them and they'd insist there's "no difference" and swapping the spring was "irrelevant" and "bogus". Guess you need to drink the kool-aid here and bash people to get to a point where you have no consequences for your actions, which is kinda sad really. I'd imagine this thread closes pretty quick, but thanks for the info in your OP. Much appreciated.

You know, if this was about a PPS, I'd be campaigning on your side, BUT, all this has already been done in the past. I put a PPQ spring in my PPS, yes, it took out a tiny bit of grittiness. Also, I put the PPS spring in the PPQ, and no change whatsoever.

Neither of my Q's were gritty when I bought them, but however, I read all the sticky threads and did the FBP "trick" just to do it. I've also done this to my PPS' as well.

It's not that we're bashing, but if changing the striker springs helped the grit feeling in a PPQ, there would be threads with this info. The Q has been around for over three years...it's all been hashed out brother. Nothing new to the game at this point.

It's not kool aid, it's experience and experimentation..it's all been done before and we know what works.
 

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Discussion Starter #46 (Edited)
I used a stock Glock spring and reduced power Vanek spring for a Glock.
I also used a digital trigger gauge. I don't have a PPS. I have no idea how many pounds the PPS spring weighs.

I didn't just use my calibrated finger gauge...

The striker is held in the cocked position, under massive spring tension. Reducing that tension will change the weight required to slide the lever off the striker face that allows the striker to fall when the trigger is pulled.
 

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Ok.

Send me a Glock spring, any Glock spring, and I'll swap it into my PPQ and measure before and after. If there's a difference, I'll send you 50 bucks.

If there's no difference, you send me 50 bucks.

Fair enough?

I'll video the whole thing so you know I'm not shading it anyone's favor.
 

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The OP stated that reducing the striker spring weight reduced the trigger pull weight. HighStandard brought this thread off course claiming that the grittiness in the trigger pull was coming from the striker spring. Two arguments have been criss crossing in this thread since post #21.

Changing the striker spring will to a lower weight striker spring will reduce the weight of the trigger pull. I said so in post #6. I agreed with the OP in post #6. If this is what some are arguing, then I agree...

...but...

...only changing the striker spring, will not remove the grittiness from the trigger pull. If this is what some are arguing, I disagree, and I've already explained why plenty of times in this thread.

Reducing trigger weight does not equal reducing trigger grittiness.
 

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Why does one have to mess with Walther Wonderkind?:)
 

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Hope I can get back here from the afterlife and see what the upshot is from this thread.
 

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a lower weight striker spring will reduce the weight of the trigger pull.
I put the PPS spring in my PPQ and there is no difference in trigger feel, or weight. However, the PPS trigger "lost" just under .5 of a pound after the PPQ spring was swapped into it.

But, to be fair...I did lightly grease the key areas of the PPQ...the disconnector, and the sear. I suppose I could hit it all with some CLP blaster or whatnot, clean it all up really good, and measure again dry.

And as good as my 9mm PPQ trigger feels...the .40 is even better. 3 times the rounds fired through it though. (same thing with the PPS, the .40 is smoother than the 9mm, though it's only discernible with a pull gauge. it's just a steady reading.)
 

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... Maybe instead of inspecting springs and looking for issues, you guys should be out there shooting the pistols, as this is likely to have the best result as far as smoothing the trigger pull, no matter where the grittiness is coming from. ...
This is the most astute remark in the entire thread.

Sometimes the hardest thing in the world is to just leave the gun alone. Shoot it and let it smooth itself out, or you just get used to it.

I was taught a lesson 25 years ago by a trio of Astra 400s: One can get used to almost any trigger pull. All three had horrible trigger pulls, gritty and heavy. I rotated them through a case of ammo. After three thousand rounds, the gritty bit faded away. The weight did not, but I just didn't notice it any more. Mind you, I was not seeking scores on a bull's-eye target, but in fast shooting at 50 feet on silhouettes they delivered as much practical accuracy as any gilt-edged SIG.

M
 

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I think the HK VP9 is SAO while the Sig 320 is 90% pre-cocked.
Almost forgot the FNH FiveseveN: SAO striker fired.

I put a Lyman digital gauge on a new PPQ at my LGS. It measured 4.75 pounds, pretty close to my Steyr C9-A1 (5#). Steyr calls their action "reset action system (double action with Druckpunkt)" but it feels real similar to the PPQ SAO, possibly because the striker block is de-activated by the trigger safety--which has very little resistance.

The thread discussion was informative for me in spite of the obvious stalemate regarding the point of view of the OP relative to the PPQ's mechanical operation.
 

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I wouldn't mind reducing the take up to be more like the VP9 or my Apex FSS trigger.

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I put an Apex trigger in my PPQ and the take-up was greatly reduced. All the other aspects of the trigger stayed the same.
 
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