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Discussion Starter #1
Hello folks,
I've been around lurking. Finally joined up because I think I have something good to add.

I've seen various complaints about the sometimes crunchy takeup that the PPQ has.

Seems to be interaction of the trigger bar and the safety plunger in the slide. I tried polishing the plunger. Polishing the trigger bar. Lubes of all sorts. Each of those was a temporary fix, or no fix.

That little coil spring goes this way and that while its being compressed, and we feel every little nuance of that in the trigger. Bothers me like a crawdad invading my swim trunks.

My own "solution" was one of counter intuition, and despair.

I figured Walther knew what they were doing when they made the spring so strong. They REALLY wanted that plunger to return to the safe position.

I got another spring, smaller in diameter than the factory spring, and stuck it inside the factory spring...nice that they were oppositely wound too.

Bingo, no more crunch. The spring-in-the-spring prevents either of 'em from moving about much is my guess.

I used a spring from a Seiko "fat 22mm springbar" for their diver's watch. The spring is stainless, rated for salt water use. It fit perfectly.

There are two issues however.

First is that you're going to increase the takeup stage of the trigger pull. Its harder to move that plunger up with both springs in there. Once the plunger reaches the trigger bar "plateau" the pull is the same.

Second, since the plunger is being depressed as the trigger is held back, you'll notice that the slide does not want to go into battery when released slowly. That is a problem that I'd rather not have.

Since I had extra springbars, and one extra Walther spring, I began to clip a coil at a time from both, until the slide closed completely, with the trigger held back, and the muzzle pointed up, and brought to that point ever so slowly by hand (not using the slide release).

My own result was smooth take up, sort of an "in between" take up pull weight (again it does not effect release weight), and reliability.

Only got to shoot a few handloads in the back yard, but function was unremarkable. It works.

So there ya go. Try at your own risk, yada yada. Nothing I said here matters, and I'm an idiot, so don't follow what I described and come back and blame me if you have any sort of issues, damage, injury, liability, acne, etc etc.
 

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That little coil spring goes this way and that while its being compressed

Are you talking about the striker spring, or the recoil spring?

Neither have any effect on the feel of the trigger when you fire a round.

The PPQ is in a fully cocked state. That is, once that slide is racked, all the trigger does is release the striker. It doesn't finish cocking the striker like Glocks, the PPS, etc. In a PPQ, the only time you'll feel friction from the striker spring is when you rack the slide. If you can feel that, you're far more sensitive than I am.

The RSA (recoil spring assembly) also has no correlation with trigger grit or crunch. It's job is to return the slide to closed position after racking, firing, or when someone uses the slide release lever. Again, the trigger pull only releases the striker.

There's some info in good detail about the matter.

I found that my trigger bar was rubbing the inside of the frame (polymer area) and so I addressed it with a little very fine smoothing. This was after examining and cleaning the FPB and it's hole several times.

I twigged to the contact between the trigger bar and frame by folding a piece of paper, placing it between the frame and trigger bar, and with the slide off, it was suddenly smoother. SO, I did what I did.

I wasn't about to bend on stuff. I think part of my problem is that the trigger bar is broken down at the trigger end where it seats onto a pivot point. The gun still fires and has for 700-some odd rounds. At some point, I'll get ahold of Walther, but that's getting into another topic that I don't want to delve into here.;)
 

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I'd love to see some detailed images of this job....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Are you talking about the striker spring, or the recoil spring?

Neither have any effect on the feel of the trigger when you fire a round.
Perhaps I should have been more clear. The little coil spring in the safety plunger. They start out straight, but after a few pulls on the trigger, and depressing of the safety plunger, they get sort of crumpled.

What they need is a tiny flat wound spring, or a tiny guide rod for the spring.

My "fix" was an idea I had when going over my notes on the "original" Colt Officer's ACP (long story, but I was given prototype barrels and had "mine" shooting before Colt did!) The close fit counter wound springs self supported. Colt used pretty much the same solution, with a different means to lock the recoil spring cap in place.

Be happy to take pics... good excuse to dust off the macro lens.
 

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I understand both the initial issue you described and the fix you employed but I strongly suggest that you discuss with Ft Smith. There should be only one striker safety spring in the recess and there should be no "crunch" feel or audible sound. When I disassembled my PPQ 45 the first time I discovered that the striker safety spring was not compressing properly and it had something similar to that "crunch" feel and sound. I thoroughly cleaned the recess and the spring which put a stop to what I felt and heard and allowed the striker safety to function smoothly. No issues have been encountered.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I dunno... maybe crunch is not the right word, but you can feel a definite "uneven drag". There are reports here of the PPQ coming back from Ft. Smith with the same problem, after going in for that very problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Pics.

polished chamfer on the edge helped


spring in a spring also helped

I apologize, because I thought they were counter-wound, they're not.

I'm also perplexed a bit, as after 10 shots or so, and lots of dry firing, I see the inner spring has also kinked. The outer spring shows residual kink (the part I removed would have shown it more clearly).

But, its a whole lot smoother, perhaps not glass smooth, but you cant feel that grit or crunch that occurred with the outer spring alone.

And I'm not saying this is "the fix" for all comers either. I'm just sayin the spring is not well supported, tends to kink, and tends to make for a gritty takeup. Even with the kinked inner spring my PPQ-45 is much smoother, and unlike the other "fixes" has remained so with lots of dry firing (which wears off the lube quite quickly).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just want to get back to folks on this. The "fix" continues to be almost as smooth as silk. Shot about about 400 rounds, eight boxes minus 12 shots in the take-home magazine. This was mixed Winchester white box, old PMC, Prvi Partizan, S&B and old Remington green/yellow box of +P 185g, and some Blazer brass.

Anyway, no issues whatsoever. I didn't give it a sledgehammer test, to see if I could get the striker to release even though the trigger wasn't pulled.

Everything worked fine. I even checked to make sure a quite a few times, that the chambered round didn't have a dented primer before firing, but in hindsight, I realize it wouldn't, because the striker wouldn't be able to be released if it did. My mistake.

One last thing, the pistol went from a gritty trigger, to a trigger that's really fun to operate. I could hit with it before, but it took effort. Now its a lot easier, even though its "heavier" in the takeup.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I did! I actually have a spare. Got it when I lost the first one (only to find it after the spare came in). The spare spring was straight. It felt pretty good. After not too long, maybe 25-30 dry fires, it felt cruncy/gritty... whatever you wanna call it. Took out the spring, it had become "bent", or no longer laying straight.

Something makes that spring kink, and when it does, the edges grab and you feel it big time. Or at least I did. My "fix", work around... whatever, seems to be doing really well. The PPQ has never felt so good, and maybe... Saturday I'll get more range time in. As it sits now, I actually take it out and dry fire a few times.... just to enjoy the trigger pull - which is outrageously nice.
 

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What happens if both of those springs kink together, and then there is no tension on the firing pin block?

There have been reports of people nickel plating the firing pin block for less than $15, and solving the gritty trigger issue. I'd much rather go that route if I didn't want to just shoot the pistol until the issue fixed itself.

Is there something on the inside of that firing pin block where the spring normally sits that would cause the spring to deform, like a burr, or an uneven base for the spring to sit in?
 
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