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I've heard of that happening somewhere else, but wouldn't the FPB still be in place keeping firing pin from hitting the primer?
 

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I would certainly like to know for sure. Anyone on this forum ever contact Walther about this(I plan to)?
 

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The part the dude in the video is pointing to is the 'single action lever'.

Reference image below:

A little ledge (arrow A) on the single action lever (part 32.1) props up the single action sear (part 32.3) by engaging at point (B).

The single action sear (point C) is engaging and holding the striker in the 'cocked' position at (point D).

When numnutz whapps the rear the PPQ with the rubber mallet, the jaring is strong enough to make the single action lever pivot rearwards. When the single action lever moves rearwards far enough, it releases the single action sear, which releases the striker which zooms forward and hits the firing pin block.

Now you have a PPQ with one in the chamber and a striker that is not cocked. OH NO....what to do. Simply move the slide rearward about 3/8" and back forward. You did not eject the round in the chamber, but you DID recock the striker.

AND, the FPB did what it was designed to do.



You can download the exploded view/parts list here https://www.carl-walther.com/fileadmin/uploads/media/partsdrawings/PPQ_M2_279_58_33_u.pdf
 

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^^^ what he said.

If this is still a worry, then you might want to try the P99 in the de-cocked mode - i.e. the striker has been released and the pistol did not fire (firing pin block did its job, as intended, when the de-cocker is pressed). In the case of the P99/P99c, the pistol is still capable of DA with the expected heavy trigger.
 

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Good point DavidS. When you depress the decocker button on a P99, an extension of the bottom of the decocker makes contact with the top of the single action lever, moving it rearwards which results in releasing the striker, letting it zooooom forward only to be stopped by the FPB.

So, if anyone wants to decock their P99 or P99C they have two choices. 1) Depress the decocker button or 2) whapp the rear of the slide with a rubber mallet. The end result is the same. The striker is stopped by the FPB.

Oh, and I can decock a PPQ with ease, without the need of whacking it with a hammer. Recocking the striker is as simple as moving the slide rearward about 3/8" and back forward into battery. I can do the same with a P99.
 

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Yep.... I was just reading Pistol-Forum and saw that post. Ok, fine, whatever.

If you are comfortable pressing the de-cocker on a P99, then what's the problem? The FPB is there for a reason.

I will continue carrying my PPQs and my P99c (without the rubber mallet !)
 

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Seems to me we've discussed this at length before and decided it was much ado about nothing.
 

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The issue people at PF have with this is that if itdid happen, you'd have a dead pistol that goes "click" instead of "bang." It's not a safety issue, but a carry-ready-condition issue. It is a concern, but to my mind a minimal one. I don't know of anyone causing this to happen except intentionally, and it seems incredibly unlikely to happen in a defensive encounter. That said, it's a possibility to be aware of, and if you aren't comfortable with it, carry something else.

Also, RE the P99 decocker being the same - not quite. Yes, the P99 has a firing pin block like the PPQ. However, when you press the decocker on a P99, the striker is actually blocked by a tab that's part of the decocker itself. If this were to fail, then the FPB would come into play. You can test this by (in safe conditions) placing a primed empty case in the chamber, holding down the decocker, and pulling the trigger. Unless there's something very wrong with your P99, the primer won't detonate. Which is one reason why holding down the decocker while you holster a P99 is a great idea.
 

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That’s a great point, and I had forgotten about that extra tab on the decocker (and on top of the striker as well). Thanks for that clarification.

In its normal function I had thought that it is the FPB block that stops the striker. I do not feel any impact on the decocker when the striker falls. If for some reason the FPB failed, then the tab would block the striker (and vice versa).

I don’t have any empty cases w/ primer to try the scenario you described but I agree that the decocker tab would stop the striker (in this case the FPB would not, as it has been pushed in as the trigger is pressed).

Thanks. I did not mean to give misleading info.

Dave
 

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I could well have it backwards, though I've seen it explained as the decocker tab being the primary stop and the FPB being a backup feature as it is in other contexts. Either way, the important things are that there's more than one thing to prevent firing when using the decocker and that pressing down the decocker is a nice extra safety layer.
 

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Series 70 1911's may, possibly, sometime, occasionally, fire when dropped at a certain angle. When was the last time you heard of it happening in the last 109 years? Just sayin'.
 

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Seems to me that if the guy in the video thought the round would fire after hitting it with the mallet, he should actually test with a cartridge with only a primer cap, no propellent.
But the FPB would function as design and his video would be discounted.
 

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I would agree with the original poster.

Yes the PPQ is obviously not a very safe design at all. The passive firing pin safety is not full proof. To give you an example Glock had to modify/redesign their guns because the passive firing pin safety could fail under certain circumstances. Naturally Glock did not label their obvious recall as a recall but an upgrade. So the moral of the story is that if the PPQ would have been much better designed it would never have slipped its striker in a fall of only 18 inches and remember this gun in the video did not drop onto the cement floor but only on to the desk which means if the gun had hit the floor the striker would have hit the passive firing pin safety much harder than it did when he just dropped it on the table. I personally would feel very uncomfortable carrying the Walther PPQ and to be frank would never do so at all.
 

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I would agree with the original poster.

Yes the PPQ is obviously not a very safe design at all. The passive firing pin safety is not full proof. To give you an example Glock had to modify/redesign their guns because the passive firing pin safety could fail under certain circumstances. Naturally Glock did not label their obvious recall as a recall but an upgrade. So the moral of the story is that if the PPQ would have been much better designed it would never have slipped its striker in a fall of only 18 inches and remember this gun in the video did not drop his gun onto the cement floor but only on the desk which means if the gun had hit the floor the striker would have hit the passive firing pin safety much harder than it did when he just dropped it on the table. I personally would feel very uncomfortable carrying the Walther PPQ and to be frank would never do so at all.
Bless your heart.
 
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