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Whoever is reading this thread, please understand that when you change one internal part on this pistol, it is no longer a PPQ. All of the testing that was done, by Walther, to ensure reliability, durability, and (most importantly) safety, no longer mean anything at all in regards to YOUR pistol.

Canik just recently issued a recall on their TP9 pistols, where the fix is simply changing springs. The Canik pistols are pretty much clones of the P99 and PPQ pistols internally. Look at the pictures of the internals of the frame and slide on this link, and tell me if they look familiar. Simply changing springs can make this pistol safe, or unsafe. I see no reason to believe that this would not also be true of the Walther.

http://cdn0.thetruthaboutguns.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Canik-stripped.jpg

Not only is there a known recall on a pistol that directly copied the internals of these Walther pistols, with the fix being a change in spring rates, but there is also the fact that it was found that an impact on the back of the slide can result in the striker being released:

https://pistol-forum.com/showthread.php?26913-Return-of-Mallet-Mallet-vs-PPQ

Now I ask this, who here has tested the pistol's ability to remain inherently drop safe with these aftermarket springs? How do you know that a simple drop will not discharge a round? Even Sig, a well known manufacturer, managed to screw this up with the P320. Do you really believe a "backyard gunsmith" is going to test this at all, much less to the same standards as firearm manufacturers? You guys are playing with fire.

If people can suggest performing actions that anyone who puts 2 plus 2 together can see would be dangerous, then I most certainly can suggest this:

DO NOT ALTER OR REPLACE THE FIRING PIN BLOCK SPRING!!!

If you do, YOU are responsible for the results. If the pistol discharges from being dropped, or from YOU falling with the pistol on your waist, it is YOUR fault. YOU chose to replace that spring when it was shown to you that it could very realistically be very dangerous to do so. YOU are responsible for any harm or death that may come to whoever is within range of your pistol. YOU are responsible for any damage to property that is within range of your pistol. YOU are responsible for any charges filed against you...

...and all for what? You guys are consciously and directly, negatively effecting the inherent safety of your pistols, trying to get an only slightly better trigger out of the polymer striker fired pistol that is known to have the best trigger available on polymer striker fired pistols. I'm really at a loss trying to figure out what you guys are trying to get out of these pistols. Even if you could provide times on a timer and targets that showed improvement, which I doubt, it still wouldn't even remotely be worth the risk.

Please, stop.
What about changing the trigger return spring only. I would like to make my pull heavier and order a 6.5lb TRS from Earl and Carl Walther Repairs. Would this render my pistol unsafe? What are your thoughts?
 

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Without knowing for sure, and speaking in general, I would think that going with a heavier trigger return spring shouldn't be an issue in regards to safety.

Personally, I believe that if you don't like the characteristics of the pistol, to include the trigger pull, the best option would probably be to find another pistol that has a better balance of characteristics for you, from the factory. IMO, that is the best way to go about it. How heavy of a trigger pull are we talking here? Just a pound or so probably would not help much if at all with the inherent safety of the pistol. If you are trying to go higher than that, maybe a P99QA would be a better option.

You're going in the opposite direction than most here in regards to tuning the trigger. You may be fine in regards to safety, but whatever spring you put in there should be tested for reliability and durability, as it wouldn't be stock, and it probably wouldn't have been made for the PPQ. Then again, if, for example, it slips off the trigger bar, or fails in some other way during an impact, it may be more dangerous. In general, going with a heavier trigger return spring, or a heavier firing pin block spring, *should* make the pistol more mechanically safe, but without knowing the specifics, it is impossible to say for certain.
 

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In the picture below, the red arrow points to the nub on the trigger bar guide that rubs/guides the trigger bar. The blue oval is the area on the trigger bar that needs to be free of any burrs and LUBED. A lot of people forget to lube this area and if you run it dry, you'll think you have a crappy trigger.


So true, even if the trigger bar was buffed in that area. A tiny dab of graphite-based anti-seize compound works wonders here and where the bar contacts the firing pin block (a dab on the sear doesn't hurt either). The compound I used on my PPQ is at least 30 years old and is labelled Never Seez Anti-Seize and Lubricating Compound.

Just to add my 2-cents to this conversation in general;

Hand buffing of contact surfaces using a cleaning patch and metal polishing compound is a pretty benign process. Like firing the gun hundreds/thousands of times, it will smooth imperfections on the surface of components that slide in contact with each other (usually under some spring tension). Done correctly buffing does NOT remove any surface hardening or make any measureable changes to critical dimensions. In other words, it makes no changes to the design or function of a firearm that would not otherwise occur through normal use.

Polishing and Buffing Wiki

Polishing is technically a more aggressive process compared to buffing, typically using an abrasive media that is glued to a substrate (such as sand paper). Metal can be removed and dimensions altered much more quickly with polishing vs. buffing. Much of what is discussed in regards to "trigger work" involves the intentional removal of material from components, which would NOT have occurred through normal wear of the firearm.

Like aftermarket triggers and the changing of other fire control components (such as springs), some might be concerned with any potential legal fallout if a pistol thus intentionally modified for a lighter trigger pull is used for defensive purposes. That in itself is a long and complicated discussion, one that is NOT my intention to get into here.

That said, my take is that "buffing" as defined in the wiki link above along with thoughtful lubrication does not constitute "intentional modification" for the purpose of making a firearm easier to discharge (or more precisely, increase the risk of accidental discharges), a track a prosecuting attorney may pursue in a wrongful death civil case.

Through just selective buffing and effective lubrication, the trigger pull on my PPQ is smooth and predictable, with a pull weight that would be expected with any other sample of the same handgun that is well used, fully "broken in" and well maintained. As such, I would have no reservation using it for self defensive purposes. Any pistol that has non-OEM parts installed for the purpose of a lighter/less deliberate trigger pull would IMO carry greater liability risk for self defense purposes.

Know up front the intended purposes of your pistol and proceed accordingly.
 

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DO NOT ALTER OR REPLACE THE FIRING PIN BLOCK SPRING!!!
If a PPQ is struck with enough force on the slide, the striker will be released. If there is a round in the chamber, the only thing to stop the PPQ from firing is the firing pin safety. If a weaker spring is installed, it will be easier for the firing pin safety to bounce out of position on impact.

I have never dropped a loaded handgun. Until a couple of days ago. I dropped a loaded PPQ in my house and the impact dropped the striker. When the PPQ hit the floor, I found myself staring straight down the muzzle. If the firing pin safety had bounced and let the striker hit the primer, this post would be from my wife explaining why I won't be around the forums anymore.

I'm going to reiterate what Balance said-
DO NOT ALTER OR REPLACE THE FIRING PIN BLOCK SPRING!!!
Of course, if the spring starts to weaken from use or gets damaged, certainly, replace it with a full strength new one. But, without exaggeration, it could be your life if you alter the spring rate so it holds the firing pin safety in place with less pressure.

It may be that you're altering a PPQ that will only be used on the range, or in a game, not duty or self defense. But when I dropped my PPQ, all I was doing was carrying to the other room while packing up to go shooting. I should never have dropped the PPQ at all. I never had before. But I did and I'm glad the firing pin safety spring was operating at full strength and the firing pin safety worked as intended.

So, one more time:
DO NOT ALTER OR REPLACE THE FIRING PIN BLOCK SPRING!!!
Thank you, balance. You get it.
 

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But I did and I'm glad the firing pin safety spring was operating at full strength and the firing pin safety worked as intended.
Sheet yeah. On P-F I commented that I was glad to hear that the safety worked as intended.

Though I do not believe that MistWolf is in this group, there are those who advocate that cleaning a firearm after every use is excessive. They speak of going thousands of rounds before performing maintenance. This, IMO, is foolhardy: a build up of firing residue or just an errant brass shaving could also render a safety feature inoperative. Cleaning after every use affords the opportunity to inspect and make sure nothing is amiss with critical safety features.

And of course, anytime a firearm is handled obey the golden rules of gun safety, which includes treating every firearm as if it is loaded. For me personally, the only time there is a round in the chamber is if (1) it's going directly into a holster for immediate CCW use or (2) I'm ready to fire. At all other times the chamber is empty, which is truly the ultimate "safety feature."

Be safe out there.
 

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...there are those who advocate that cleaning a firearm after every use is excessive.
The PPQ is my EDC. Because it gets carried everyday, it constantly collects dust bunnies in every nook and cranny, so it needs constant care. It gets dirtier from being carried than shot!
 

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Thanks for this. Great post. It should be a Sticky. As a competitor I am going to order a 3.5lb and a 6lb spring. IPSC has a minimum trigger pull of 5lbs. Having the two springs allows me to move from IPSC to IDPA seamlessly.

Take Care

Bob
 

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Little late to the party here but wanted to thank the original poster. Just did this mod and dropped my trigger pull weight by approx. 1.75 lbs. A nice change.


I have a hand full of extra springs left if anyone wants to try.
 

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Thanks for this. Great post. It should be a Sticky. As a competitor I am going to order a 3.5lb and a 6lb spring. IPSC has a minimum trigger pull of 5lbs. Having the two springs allows me to move from IPSC to IDPA seamlessly.

Take Care

Bob
IPSC production rules changed to 5 lbs first pull (DA) and no restrictions on follow-up (SA), or 3 lbs every pull (i.e. strikers)
 

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First off thanks for this mod OP! I started having reset/cycling issues that I think were as a result of the MCMaster spring I put in which had about 1500 rounds through it before it started giving me issues. I used this spring:
McMaster 302 Stainless Steel Corrosion-Resistant Extension Spring with Loop Ends, 0.75" Long, 0.180" OD, 0.022" Wire Diameter, Packs of 3
I also have the Apex flat faced trigger and Venom rds and a legion prescion compensator (gun is PPq Q4 Tac). It ran amazing for quite a while, then I started having this issue which I describe in this thread PPQ Q4 TAC issue, slide not going into battery. Barrel...

But basically the slide kept getting stuck part way on it's path into battery and I would feel a thud on my trigger finger like the trigger was trying to be reset but it was stuck or hitting something. To remedy I would have to smack the back of slide, one time I had to even use a soft blow hammer as my hand wasn't doing the trick. Other times is would lock back with a loaded mag and I had to remove the mag to get the slide to drop, the release wasn't working. I swapped out the TRS for the stock one and it works as should it again. I'm wondering if 1500 rds is a normal life span for the Mcmaster TRS? I have 2 more so I'd like to throw another one on to try as I very much prefer it over stock. However I need my gun to cycle. I would appreciate any feedback and perhaps if anyone had a similar experience after some time on the Mcmaster spring. Cheers!
 

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Thanks, I found this, although I don't want to mess with the firing block. Have you had experience with just using this TRS?

I also found the light trs from Walther, 20nm which is about 4.5lbs so I guess that's better than stock by a little WALTHER PPQ TRIGGER SPRINGS 3X 20 N LIGHT

Have you used both by chance? Pretty expensive for what they are so thought I'd ask about personal experience. Thanks!
 

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I've used the Sprinco spring kit and its very good. I've not used the Walther kit.
Awesome thanks! And did you use the Sprinco firing pin spring as well in conjunction with the TRS? If so any issues with the firing pin spring?
Thanks again for help :)
 
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