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The PPK came in at 19.1 oz., the PPK/S at 21.4 oz. So as I suspected, there is a difference of 2.3 oz. That's a 28.2% increase, not insignificant.
In Europe we tend to calculate things a little more modestly: A PPK weighs 625 grams, while a PPK/S has a weight of 670 grams (both with empty magazine). That's an increase of only 7.2%.
 

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Yeah, you're right, Balogh. Got my numbers fouled up last night, but our figures differ. I weighed my guns again, this time with the empty mags in the gun, in grams, a heathenish way to measure. :) The PPK, empty mag in the gun, weighed in at 588 grams, PPK/S @ 654 grams. That's 12.2%, by my computer. Both mags had the finger rest, which does make a difference. I can't account for the difference between your slightly heavier gross, but that's the way it goes. Is my scale off? Did the steel compound differ?
 

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I wasn't able to verify the weights because the new Fort Smith models aren't available yet. I got the values from Walther's international website.

I'll measure some of my exemplars on my own later this day.
 

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A kind of Weight Watchers analysis...
PPK.jpg

PPK .380 ACP, 614 grams = 21.65 oz.

PPKS.jpg

PPK/S .380 ACP, 677 grams = 23.88 oz.

PPKS .32.jpg

PPK/S .32 ACP, 679 grams = 23.95 oz.
 

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My nightstand gun, a 1977 PPK in .32 ACP.
Ready.jpg

Loaded and ready to carry, 706 grams = 24.90 oz.

Loaded.jpg

Loaded, 655 grams = 23.10 oz.

Empty.jpg

Empty magazine, 600 grams = 21.16 oz.
 

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My interest in Walthers is primarily as elegant, interesting machines, not as defensive tools. I've a couple 3 .45 Colts (okay, imports) that are interesting to shoot for the same reason.

Point being, if it is possible to carry a pistol, in a service caliber, holding more rounds, that is more pleasant to shoot, that has shown itself stone reliable, and that has the same size and weight...why resort to a Walther?

But, if your answer is, "I simply like to carry Walthers", there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. :)
Moon
 

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I have a S&W version of the Walther PPK in .380, have three mags for it (one has a pinky extension, two have a flat bottom). I like the pinky extension on best. I also have a current model PPK/S in .22 And both mags have the pinky extension. My take from a grip standpoint is if you have small hands, go with the PPK, otherwise go for the PPK/S.

The PPK I have is an S&W I picked up at a local gun show. I had some trouble with it for a while, and had to send it to Walther (twice) for resolution (all on their dime). Since then, it has been a great little shooter. Unlike some, I have no issues with the extended beaver tail, and find it to be a good old design gun that still does what it was intended to do, while looking like a real gun versus the newer squared off, plastic looking (although quite functional) guns.
 

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My interest in Walthers is primarily as elegant, interesting machines, not as defensive tools. I've a couple 3 .45 Colts (okay, imports) that are interesting to shoot for the same reason.

Point being, if it is possible to carry a pistol, in a service caliber, holding more rounds, that is more pleasant to shoot, that has shown itself stone reliable, and that has the same size and weight...why resort to a Walther?

But, if your answer is, "I simply like to carry Walthers", there is absolutely nothing wrong with that. :)
Moon
I have to agree with you Moon. There are simply better options today in terms of power, reliability and shootability.

In terms of class, style and historical significance though, the old PP series is ahead by a mile.
 

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Yeah, there are always better choices in power, reliability, and shootability...I guess. You can meet the apex of two of these criteria with a powerful revolver...say a .44 Magnum shorty like S&W makes. Shootability? Not so much. Few people carry a .44 Mag for self defense; too much gun: big, heavy, large, kicks like hell. So we don't always go for the ultimate in handguns.

Portability is a fourth requirement I would add. Important to me, at least. A .32 in your hand is worth more than a 1911 .45 in your safe. Not ideal, but it meets all four of the criteria.

I don't have the experience of thousands of rounds thru my PP handguns, but so far, they've been completely reliable. Hardball. Powerful enough that European police and military units carried them for a long time.

People remark on the .380 being snappy. Back in 84, I qualified with a PPK in .380 and never gave a thought to recoil. This board is the place I first encountered this view, It is what it is and more comfortable than short-barreled .357s, which were in vogue back then. In fact I shot the highest score in personal gun qualification with that gun. No malfunctions, good sights.
 

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I‘m calling foul on the classic PPK having to sleep in a PK380 holster. Have you no shame! :eek:
Don't worry. In this holster I never carried a PK380 despite that fact that I really own such a gun. No PPK were harmed. This holster has the advantage that it is soft inside. It doesn't hurt the gun's finish and there is no danger of the leather's tannings. That's the reason why it isn't my only holster of this particular type. Too bad it isn't available without the modell labelling. ;)
 

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With my PPKs and the pinky-extension, I can get my little finger on the grip quite comfortably, so maybe my hands aren't as large as I thought. With the flat base mag, I curl my finger around the bottom and shoot OK, but I prefer the grip extension. Especially with the .380...a bit more felt control.
 
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