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I just bought a 1966 in the box, like new, for $1500 and feel I got a good deal. I missed out on another one a few days easier that eventually went for $2000. If yours is as you describe, my recent experience would suggest $2000-2500 would be the number. It all depends on how desperate you are to get rid of it. If you aren’t desperate it might take weeks or months but you might eventually find someone to ring the bell at $2500.
 

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The ad listed it as C&R...has something changed? Other guns, identical to newer production, remain as ordinary transfer.
And $2500? Wow, just wow.
Moon
 

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The ad listed it as C&R...has something changed? Other guns, identical to newer production, remain as ordinary transfer.
And $2500? Wow, just wow.
Moon
Has something changed?

Yes. It’s 2019. :D

Any gun older than 50 years is AUTOMATICALLY considered a C&R. That’s how I was able to get my 1966 PPK into California. If it was a 1970, that would be bad. But since it’s 1966, it’s good.

Welcome to the world of gun registration bureaucracy. :rolleyes:

And as for the price? I think it is a reflection of its consideration as a collector’s item rather than a practical tool. Is it 3x better than a newer one? Certainly not. And if all you want a tool, and you live in a state where such tools are sold, it would be silly to buy this one.
 

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The .380 PPK is an odd bird. The .32 seems to have secured a general top price of $2,500 for NIB with original paperwork. The .380 is less desired (but still highly sought after). Generally I see them go in the $1,500 but depending on the buyer and how much they want it, they have been creeping to the $2,000 range. The important thing to remember, and some buyers don't, is that it is not a .32. I wouldn't go above $2,000, but that is just me personally.
 

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Mike, the 50 year thing was my impression as well, but I attempted to buy a early 50s '35 Beretta, and the vendor was sure my C&R didn't apply, as did a reference book I checked.

It would be great were it so.
Moon
 

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Mike, the 50 year thing was my impression as well, but I attempted to buy a early 50s '35 Beretta, and the vendor was sure my C&R didn't apply, as did a reference book I checked.

It would be great were it so.
Moon

It is most emphatically so. Don’t take my word for it. I just copied this from the ATF website:

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Curios & Relics

A regulation implementing Federal firearms laws, 27 CFR §478.11, defines Curio or Relic (C&R) firearms as those which are of special interest to collectors by reason of some quality other than is associated with firearms intended for sporting use or as offensive or defensive weapons.

To be recognized as C&R items, 478.11 specifies that firearms must fall within one of the following categories:

Firearms which were manufactured at least 50 years prior to the current date, but not including replicas of such firearms;

Firearms which are certified by the curator of a municipal, State, or Federal museum which exhibits firearms to be curios or relics of museum interest; and

Any other firearms which derive a substantial part of their monetary value from the fact that they are novel, rare, bizarre, or because of their association with some historical figure, period, or event.

(In bold print) Firearms automatically attain C&R status when they are 50 years old. Any firearm that is at least 50 years old, and in its original configuration, would qualify as a C&R firearm. It is not necessary for such firearms to be listed in ATF's C&R list. Therefore, ATF does not generally list firearms in the C&R publication by virtue of their age.


However, if you wish for a classification of your particular firearm under categories (b) or (c) above and wish your item to be listed, you may submit the weapon to the Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division (FATD) for a formal classification.
 

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Madness. Another 66 PPK in .380 just sold for 2825.00 with 4 magazines, and only because 2 bidders got in a bidding war.
 

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ppk 67

Wow! I have '67 PPK 7.65, no import markings, in the box unfired (I bought it on time, $15 a month, I think it was $66, total) . Looking at those prices I think I'll hang on. BTW, the slide is beginning to show a slight plum color. I don't think it has ever been in the sunlight.
 

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I purchased a '66 PPK 7.65 in like new condition 7 or 8 years ago and paid $750 for it. At the time I thought I may have overpaid. With current prices through the roof it now looks like a bargain. Incredibly accurate pistol and lots of fun to shoot.
 

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...Firearms automatically attain C&R status when they are 50 years old. Any firearm that is at least 50 years old, and in its original configuration, would qualify as a C&R firearm. It is not necessary for such firearms to be listed in ATF's C&R list. Therefore, ATF does not generally list firearms in the C&R publication by virtue of their age...

As I said, Mike, this was my impression as well...the dealer was adamant that that he couldn't honor my C&R because the '35 Beretta had continued in production, in its original form, until more recently than the '51 born-on date of the one I was looking at. Don't recall when they quit making them, but that, at least, was his argument. I bought it as a standard pistol purchase, so it wasn't the end of the world.
Thanks for the comeback,
Moon
 

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Moon,

Simply put, the dealer doesn’t know what he’s talking about. The rules are black and white, and it doesn’t matter if a manufacturer continued to manufacture an identical product more recently. If it’s 50 years or older, that PARTICULAR gun is a C&R. A different particular gun that was made more recently, even if otherwise identical, is not C&R.

I can understand a seller being reluctant to ship directly to a C&R license holder and insisting on shipping to a regular FFL instead—that’s just being extremely cautious.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks for all input. I have 65 Ulm production PPK NIB, all the paper work. The price of mine back in 1998 was $1600.00, according to the appraisal it was down $300.00 , from the prior appraisal, the reason given new production in USA. I can't remember when the other appraisal was, probably 3 years prior. I am thinking it is time to let it go.
 
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