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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

New member here. I have a Interarms PPK/S .380, which I love. I am very accurate with it, and don't mind the recoil/bite, but do mind the blood on my hand and gun after about 30 rounds. When going to the range, I started shooting it as the last of my guns, so I don't get blood on my other guns. I read the suggestion on the forum of using a glove to solve this problem, which I may try. I'm wondering if I'll build up a callus so this won't be a problem. I usually shoot once a week, and am starting to see a callus build up. Wish me luck.
 

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I don't think a callus will help with slide bite, and that's assuming you can even build one up properly from slide bite. Typically speaking, calluses are formed by things like friction, irritation, or at worst repeated blunt force to the skin, whereas lacerations such as those folks get from slide bite tend to result in scabs, blisters, and eventually scars rather than calluses.

What you need to do is try gripping the gun a bit lower to grant your hand clearance. I have rather large hands myself, but only suffered slide bite as a result of gripping the frame too high the first couple times I shot it, since then I've learned how to grip it just slightly lower so that the slide doesn't even graze my hand.

This is a common problem with PPKs and to a lesser extent the PPK/S, hence why S&W extended the grip tang and Walther Arms is doing so as well with the forthcoming production, but it can be solved by learning to adjust your grip.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for that advice. I'll try your suggestion this Friday and report back.
 

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Great post... I love the part where it reads, "Go get it and hold it in your shooting hand. I'll wait..."

I had searched the forum but didn't run into that information. I will try if Friday and report back.
 

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I'm fairly new to posting on this forum but there is one thing that I learned here... and that is this forum is a great means of getting answers for your Walther questions.

I have large hands myself and when I shoot my PPK/s I found that you cannot hold it with your thumb positioned up high on the pistol frame like you would with a "larger" framed semi-auto. When I shoot my PPK/s I curl the thumb of my shooting hand downward over the middle and ring finger (of my shooting hand). I find that doing this allows the slide to pass safely over the fleshy part between my thumb and index finger when the PPK/s is discharged.
 

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Steve has a good explanation, and very clear photos. A lot of it comes down to hand size; I've never been 'bitten', and I'm not especially careful of how I grasp a Walther.
For range work, a bike glove will tame the 'rap' of the .380, and also protect the hand. As UE explains in the sticky, he won't worry about it in a 'social' situation.
Moon
 
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I like the part. Good going on the part of the designer. Original concept, looks good, apparently functions fine. Inexpensive. Can be removed without altering the firearm....very important should you ever want to sell the pistol. I'm thinking I agree with not everyone can easily grip a small PP pistol and why have to go to the trouble of double checking your grip with each shot. In my opinion...this should have been a non issue long ago.

What I wonder is with the new production of the PPK, why can't that big beak be redesigned to offer an aesthetically pleasing curve. Not too long, not too thick but large enough to get the job done. Seems it would be a very easy redesign. That big blob hanging out there looks like the first concept that came to the designers drawing board with no further refinement attempted.

My hands are small and thin...so none of this is an issue to me. I can imagine a hammer banging down against your hand would hurt almost as much as the slide dragging across your skin or into it. M1911
 

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What I wonder is with the new production of the PPK, why can't that big beak be redesigned to offer an aesthetically pleasing curve. Not too long, not too thick but large enough to get the job done. Seems it would be a very easy redesign. That big blob hanging out there looks like the first concept that came to the designers drawing board with no further refinement attempted.
M1911
Write this out, wrap it around a brick, and deliver it to Ft. Smith. A little more beavertail would solve a myriad of problems. Concur that a shooter shouldn't have to worry too much how he grasps his gun under stress especially.
BTW, our handgun students often want to emulate how Dirty Harry grasped his .44, with the offhand thumb crossed behind the gun. That will draw blood, but they generally only do it once.
Moon
 

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What I wonder is with the new production of the PPK, why can't that big beak be redesigned to offer an aesthetically pleasing curve. ...
I've said it before and I'll say it again, the extension ought to be redesigned as an actual extension, as in an supplemental piece that can be pinned into the standard tang to lengthen it.

All they'd have to do is machine the standard tang with a drift pin hole or something and include a cheap little polymer extension which the user could attach if he/she so desired. It would likely be cheaper than what they're doing, wouldn't throw off the look of the PPK, and would be an overall better solution to the subjective issue.
 
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Keep the shooting hand thumb down to help with grip stability and there will be no PP(K/S) love bites. Hold it high like a Block and be sloppy with your thumb and you will get bit, as you should :p
 

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The above is no small part of the problem. Current wisdom is to ride the gun as high as possible; it reduces the moment arm, felt recoil, and muzzle rise. If you're blessed with big paws, it can also lead to slide bite in the Walther.
Moon
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't think my problem is slide bite. I went to the range yesterday and tried placing my thumb across my middle finger as suggested, but still had the same problem. With me it just seems to be that I'm old, have thin skin and the actual recoil is causing the problem:




I have no problem living with the issue. I love the gun and it only starts happening after 30 rounds or so. I am accurate with it and in the case I ever really had to defend myself with it, if I miss 30 times, it won't matter much if my hand is bleeding...
 
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Try wearing some foam-rubber padded bike gloves, if it is indeed just the recoil, then the gloves should soften the blow enough to prevent such an injury.

This is why most folks who plan on using the PPK as a range gun tend to opt for one chambered in .22LR or .32 ACP, the .380 is a snappy round to begin with, and in a straight blowback pistol like the PPK the felt recoil is generally considered to be uncomfortable/painful to shoot for any length of time.
 

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Sfvpool, You can't be older than me or have thinner skin, & I have been shooting PPK's since the late 1950's & I have never had slide bite. Try holding your shooting thumb as low on the other thumb as possible.

I do love the little guns & have carried them forever. I do wear a large glove & & I guess I have never thought about slide bite much. I guess I have had every kind of 380 made nearly & the PPK stays my favorite 380/32/22. I do like the Bersa CC (small one) as it has even better features than a PPK, but it's not a PPK.
 

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So apparently it's only going to happen at the range, because that's the only place you'll shoot enough..."it only starts happening after 30 rounds or so"...to cause you any issues. Try the gloves.
 

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gene 1:

I have the Bersa Thunder .380 and it is a little smoother than the Walther, it only starts bothering me after 50 rounds or so. But I like the Walther more - it is so solid, so pretty, and so repeatable - and James Bond is a factor. My carry gun is a Beretta 84FS Cheetah .380.
 

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Current wisdom is to ride the gun as high as possible; it reduces the moment arm, felt recoil, and muzzle rise. If you're blessed with big paws, it can also lead to slide bite in the Walther.
Moon
My paws are certainly above average, and I see a big difference in the position of the skin between my shooting thumb and forefinger if I do or do not lock down my shooting thumb. Holding or locking the shooting thumb down pulls that skin out of danger. I see a lot of shooters nowadays holding their shooting thumb parallel to the slide and floating out there unsupported. That is a sure recipe for slide bite with the PP-series pistols, IMO.

None of this addresses the snappy recoil of the .380 when shooting more than a couple of magazines. Shooting 30+ rounds at the range would surely benefit from wearing some kind of glove.
 
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Don't forget that some of this can be fixed with a thicker pair of handles.

The narrow grip on the PP series doesn't let the slide clear the hand very well. Thicker grips will push the hand away from the flying slide and actually spread the recoil around more making the pistol somewhat easier to shoot.

You can play around with holding the pistol lower on the frame, but the recoil of the .380 is stout and will drive the receiver down into your palm, lowering the slide enough to cut.
 
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