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Discussion Starter #1
if I read the postings correctly, the PPK/S. 22cal is being discontinued. I also think it is fair to say there are as many that dislike the 22cal version, as there are those who like it. (that like/hate discussion could go on forever with no benefit). my question to the forum is ..

"Will the remaining PPK/S 22cal handguns being sold now start going up or down in price?"

There are a few of them at a local outdoor store and I wondered it would be a investment to get one.
 

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Thinking about it logically — a gun that obviously didn't do very well in the market to the point it's being discontinued after a very short production run of only a couple of years — I certainly wouldn't look at it as an "investment" piece. Any increase in price would start pushing up against the price floor of the much more desirable earlier iterations from Ulm and Manurhin. That ain't gonna happen.
 

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Seeing as Walther has chosen to quietly discontinue them in the manner which they have, the general public will likely remain ignorant to the discontinuation of the PPK/S ,22LR, and thus everything will go on exactly as it has.
No one here would likely have even noticed if I hadn't pointed out their absence on carl-walther.de and subsequently looked into it.

They're still widely available and there's no reason to expect the supply to drop to any notable degree anytime within the forseeable future.

It's highly unlikely that they'll ever become a collector's item, or that they'll ever even become rare enough to even be considered as such.

Seriously, they've been in production since 2013, yet I've never even encountered anyone who owned one that has been manufactured since 2013, (I bought mine in October of 2015 and it's dated 2013) so that right there should give you an idea of both their availability and desirability.
Hell, that's probably why they were discontinued in the first place. They were a flop which appealed to a niche market.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for some well thought out comments. the comment by 'Agent PPKS' really got me thinking about the production run of the Ft. Smith PPK/S 22S. The date on the one I saw for sale was also 2013 (BD). I've tried to find production numbers from Walther, but doesn't seem to be available. Anyone ever seen Walther communicate production run numbers?
 

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You might be able to figure a ballpark figure by getting the Serial numbers from the last ones purchased.
 

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Agent, you have one. Do they work about as reliably as any other B-flat .22 auto? Are the controls the same as a regular PP series (I believe they are).
It seems to me that they'd make a dandy trainer for a .380 PP if nothing else. I've never looked; how are they priced?
Moon
 

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The PPK/S .22LR is my first pistol chambered in .22LR, ergo I cannot comment on how they compare to other .22LR pistols.
However, I can tell you this much, for all I've read about .22LR pistols being ammo sensitive and their tendency towards FTF/FTE, the PPK/S will reliably feed and eject anything high velocity as well as any standard velocity ammo provided that it has a fast burning primer, (in fact, the only ammo I'm aware of with feeding issues is Winchest Whitebox) so I can only presume that it's above average as far as .22LR pistols go.
The controls are identical to any other PP, in fact the only notable differences between the Umarex PPK/S .22LR and other PPKs are the shrouded/threaded barrel and the fact that the frame is solid beneath the grip panels.

Pricing varies substantially from place to place. My LGS wanted $375, Cabelas wanted $320, and Gander Mountain wanted a whopping $500! I ended up getting mine from my LGS because it was convenient and I wanted to support a local business, plus the closest Cabelas is outside of my State, so with the cost of gas plus transfer fee it would have ended up costing me about the same or more.
When they go on sale, they can be had for as little as $275 NiB, which I feel is a very nice price.

That said, the Bersa Thunder/Firestorm in .22LR has a similar size/feel to the PPK/S, has a steel slide/aluminum frame, and generally goes for $285 or less, so as much as I love my PPK/S .22LR, the Bersa Thunder .22LR seems like a better deal.
However, as a trainer, I can easily recommended the PPK/S .22LR due to being a near perfect replica of a PPK/S in terms of look, function, and even weight, whereas the Bersa has a longer barel, different control layout, and is lighter in weight.
 

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Walther Ft Smith is still advertising them. So there must be a lot of them still available in their warehouse.

The poor thing got such bad press on this forum. I surprise they sold any at all. Luckily some of us didn't listen to them and purchased one. I found that mine worked a good as my PP in .22. In fact it has been so long since I fired the PP. It is now in my weapons bag. Waiting to go out the next time I go to the range.

Agent is right. The PPK/S feels about the same as any other PPK/S 380 or .32. The grips are a little different in feel do to a different texture, but the fit the same. It takes down like any PP series pistol. The safety is were it belongs. The DA is real stiff, at first. However, either I have acquired a lot of muscles in my trigger finger or it has loosen up with use.

One thing to remember, when you are putting the slide back on. Make sure that the spring doesn't get caught between the end of the barrel and the slide opening. It can be a bare to rack the slide or take it back off. I found out the hard way early on. That was my mistake not the weapons. Otherwise it has been trouble free.

As far as ammo, the only problem has been the Winchester Super "X" and their bulk white box. They seem to be make for rifles only. When I purchased the weapon. I only had .22LR from the late 60's through the early 80's Remington, Winchester Wild Cat, CCI, and Federal. It ate it all.

It a weapon that is cheap enough. That I can throw in my glove box with a couple of boxes of ammo. So when I am at one of my cousins farms. We can BS and shot at cans. The farthest I have bound cans is about 80 meters. So it is accurate enough to enjoy.
 

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Thankfully, most of the posts against the PPK/S .22LR I've read were too saturated with obvious bias and hyperbole for me to take seriously. It's painfully obvious when something is unfairly hated because those who put it down are utterly incapable of eloquent speech and lack enough tangible evidence to adequately explain why it merits such disdain, ergo they just spam negative adjectives and pass the buck onto whomever requests further clarification, then if you do any research of your own it comes back clean.

Seriously, the closest thing to a legitimate reason to doubt the quality of the PPK/S .22LR I've ever seen anyone produce was ad hominem regarding the P22's infamous slide cracks, but even that doesn't hold much water when the PPK/S .22LR has a thicker slide, and from what I can tell pretty much all instances of the P22's slide cracking was a result of defective ammo blowout, meaning it won't even happen under ordinary circumstances. Besides, even if the P22's slide were made of steel, an ammo blowout would still likely damage the gun in some way be it warped slide, bent rails, and/or bulged barrel, thus requiring the gun to be serviced either way, so it's completely irrelevant.
Furthermore, I've yet to find a single report of a PPK/S .22LR's slide cracking under any circumstances, including reports of ammo blowouts, so until I hear otherwise, the PPK/S .22LR seems to be built more than well enough to worry about the slide cracking.
The only real 100% legitimate strike against the PPK/S .22LR is its ridiculously heavy double action trigger pull, but either that smooths out significantly with age or my finger has simply gotten enough exercise from using it that it no longer feels heavy.

As for the slide getting jammed, that seems to be a byproduct of the extra long recoil spring on the PPK/S .22LR. Seriously, the thing is like 1/4th longer than those on a .380 ACP PPK.

So yeah, while it may not be the prettiest nor well constructed PPK ever to be released, it delivers as a plinking/training pistol, so if that's what you want out of it, you won't regret it. If you're expecting a masterpiece of oldworld, hand-fitted art, then you're in the wrong price range and should have known better than to expect anything of the sort out of this to begin with.
 

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There's plenty of hyperbole going on here, all right. Bias, too, apparently. Let's do our best to stick to the question at hand and leave the flights of fancy for that website on constructing screenplays.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Owning a good quality gun is a little like owning a piece of art, you need to have pride in they way it looks, feels, and is designed (as well as accuracy, and precision). With that said, the look and feel of the Walther PPK and PPK/S guns appeals to many.

I decided to buy that PPK/S 22lr (serial number @24000) that I mentioned earlier, and think it will be something I will pass on to my son with pride when the time is right.

It just has a timeless look that few pistols can compete with. I know that's a very subjective comment, but most art comments are.
 

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These PP series weapons are not for competition. Unless everyone is shooting the same type PP, or they are Jamey Bond. Only he can shoot the eye out of a fly at 3000 meters, with a PPK. The PP series was meant to kill in the 9mmk and 7.65mm. The 5.6mm was meant to practice. They did make some longer barrels ones that could be used for competition. Over here the PP in 22LR was meant for practice and plinking. Thar include the old ones and the new.

As far as a collectors item, Yes, in time. It seems they all only have a 2013 date. So they are probably only a one year production. Not because they were a bad idea or weapon.

The reps from Walther Ft. Smith, were on here all the time and read all of the negativity posting about the new PPK/S .22LR, by the purist and want to bees. I am sure there was a lot of discussion, at Walther, about this weapon and the negative impact it was having at the Walther forum.

Walther does or has listened to what was being said on this forum. They brought back the PPQ M1 after so many cried that they had to have a paddle release. They gave you the a 5" PPQ, and one in 45 cal. Because so many were crying they had to have one. They cried again because the PPQ in .22LR was not made like their other PPQ's.

So now you can pay through the nose for a original PP series 22LR, a little cheaper for a Post War copy PP series 22LR, or a cheaply priced PPK/S .22LR. Like all Walthers, they do fall under the lifetime guarantee.

Will Walther ever produce a all steel PP series .22LR, again. No, it will not be cost effective, very few will be sold, and the purist will also find something wrong with it.

Yes, there is a Santa Claus, and one day the new PPK/S .22LR will be a collectors item. It will be needed for someone to fill out their Walther collection. Just like all the other Walthers/Manurhins and even the S&W ones.
 

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Doesn't BE stand for 2014. I know I've seen some with BE stamped on it. I'm sure I can even produce a picture of one.
 

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I am still wringing my German built model PPK/S out. I have sent it back to WA for testing and they checked it out and said it is fine. I have had some FTF/stove piping and burr issues. I very lightly Dremel-deburred the sharp chamber edge burrs and am waiting to get it back for further testing. So far, it shoots high for me? Walther suggested a different ammo (Federal Auto Match) which I have a carton of and I will continue this saga when I get the PPK/S back. This pistol shoots high for me. However, most semi autos do except my Colt Mustang carry gun which is dead on.

Wish me luck. I have owned this pistol for about 5 years but never shot it until two weeks ago. It was shooting 18 inches high at first. Walther says is is shooting on target now with the high front sight?
 

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I believe the alloy PPK/S .22LR has only been available for three years. Unless you have one of the earlier all steel ones. The later ones come with three different front sights to raise or lower your point of aim.
 

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>>>...I believe the alloy PPK/S .22LR has only been available for three years...<<<

The '..new..', Zamak-alloy, WALTHER/UMAREX PPK/S .22LR was introduced/announced back in February or March, 2013.
 

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You are right, I am wrong. I checked and bought the stupid pistol in 2013, like anyone but me cares!!!!!!! The Forum Ninja's strike again. Oh stupid, stupid me! It is 5:30 o'clock in the stinking morning here and some Ninja fan boy is already correcting me! You can give yourselve's a very little, gold star for being so observant?

The bottom line is: will the stinking pistol shoot or not. I was a Mechanical (Automation) Engineer from 1966 until 2003 retirement and rose to Director of WW Engineering and Manufacturing in a Fortune 100 company. I also have a Masters Degree, and was a SME Certified Robotics Engineer for 30 years. so back off! Plus, I also an Army Infantry Veteran and have some shooting medals in small bore and .45 ACP, both civilian and Army.

This pistol is not the crowning achievement of German engineering!!!!!!!!!!!!! I had owned two prior .32 ACP PPK's, one Nazi War Model and one commercial from the 1950's. They shot to aim, they worked and they were accurate. Now go back under your rock and I will let you know how I did before I decide to make a tent peg out of this POS pistol which is from what it has shown me, so far, would be appropriate!
 
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