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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I am about to buy a PPK.
It's from 1973.
I wanted to ask what are the main things I should be careful inspecting it before buying it ?
thank you
 

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Hello,
I am about to buy a PPK.
It's from 1973.
I wanted to ask what are the main things I should be careful inspecting it before buying it ?
thank you
Welcome to Watherforums! Here's what I'd check... :)

What type of PPK is it? Is it stainless or blue? What caliber is it? What percentage of blue is remaining...is there any pitting (or scratches or gouging on a stainless)? Does it have the box, accessories, instruction manual, and test target? Does it have both magazines, one with a finger extension? Are the grips original to the gun...are there any chips or cracks?

Check the sights and barrel crown for obvious damage. Do a compete function check according to the instructions in the manual (available online from Walther USA). Be sure the hammer drop safety works correctly and clicks easily on and off. Check the magazines for dents and function...the follower should move freely without binding (I'd take them apart and check the springs). The slide should lock back on both empty mags.

Remove the slide and check the recoil spring. With the safety off, push the firing pin in from the rear to be sure it's not broken and the tip isn't chipped. Check the indicator pin by pushing it up and in...should return under light spring pressure. The extractor should move freely under strong spring tension...be sure the tip isn't broken or chipped.

Make sure the frame has all of its little parts. The trigger guard shouldn't be dinged and the spring should be working. The barrel hood, chamber and rifling should be free of damage or pitting. The feed ramp should be free of gouges or damage. The hammer should move freely in concert with the hammer block. Check the ejector/slide stop...no chips or damage with the spring in place and working.

That's just what pops into my head sitting here at the computer...you can be sure there's a lot I've missed. Your best bet is to take it to a gunsmith to be fully checked. Test fire it before buying if you can...or ask if you can return it if it doesn't work right. Good luck... :D
 

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Nice reply, Milspec; that has all the makings of a Sticky, seeing as how this question pops up from time to time.

A test-drive is ideal, although it is not always practical, especially with an internet purchase. And given some of the issues that we have seen with recent models, an emphasis on examining the pistol's safety function, to ensure that it is in proper working order, is a must. I also would recommend reading the owner's manual first, gaining a better understanding of how the model is supposed to work, and then carefully walking your way through the operation of the gun in question, step by step, matching the performance of the actual pistol to what is described in the manual.

The PPK is a wonderful model of craftsmanship and efficiency and style. A gun that has been properly cared for should provide you with many years of service. Good luck.
 

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Welcome to Watherforums! Here's what I'd check... :)

What type of PPK is it? Is it stainless or blue? What caliber is it? What percentage of blue is remaining...is there any pitting (or scratches or gouging on a stainless)? Does it have the box, accessories, instruction manual, and test target? Does it have both magazines, one with a finger extension? Are the grips original to the gun...are there any chips or cracks?

Check the sights and barrel crown for obvious damage. Do a compete function check according to the instructions in the manual (available online from Walther USA). Be sure the hammer drop safety works correctly and clicks easily on and off. Check the magazines for dents and function...the follower should move freely without binding (I'd take them apart and check the springs). The slide should lock back on both empty mags.

Remove the slide and check the recoil spring. With the safety off, push the firing pin in from the rear to be sure it's not broken and the tip isn't chipped. Check the indicator pin by pushing it up and in...should return under light spring pressure. The extractor should move freely under strong spring tension...be sure the tip isn't broken or chipped.

Make sure the frame has all of its little parts. The trigger guard shouldn't be dinged and the spring should be working. The barrel hood, chamber and rifling should be free of damage or pitting. The feed ramp should be free of gouges or damage. The hammer should move freely in concert with the hammer block. Check the ejector/slide stop...no chips or damage with the spring is in place and working.

That's just what pops into my head sitting here at the computer...you can be sure there's a lot I've missed. Your best bet is to take it to a gunsmith to be fully checked. Test fire it before buying if you can...or ask if you can return it if it doesn't work right. Good luck... :D
Very well done. And very useful. Why not to put this into PP FAQ?
 

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Wow....great info! I would add, as Searcher suggests (especially if new to Walthers); READ all you can about them. It's immensely helpful as you "shop" for one and it's fascinating to learn about this fabulous breed of weaponry!
 

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BTW, may be we could extend it a littlewith advices on buying new S&W PPK.
As per my experience this would be:
1. check if you can remove the slide (field-strip) without too much effort. If it does not come off when you pull it fully back this means recoil spring is too long.
2. Take a snap cap, put it into chamber and make sure it sits tight and not too lose.
If it 'wobbles' in the chamber even a little bit, the chamber is oversized.
 

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A very patient gunshop owner allowed a Walther rookie to handcycle a magazine of .22s thru' a brand new PPK/s, allowing the live rounds to bounce into the garbage can. He then sold me the gun for $75, and later gave me $85 on a trade for a Chief's Special. Doubt any shop would let you do that nowadays...but the field strip and magazine exam should pass muster, at least in a shop that sells some old guns.
Good summary, MilSpec.
Moon
 

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What to look for before I buy (grat tips for anyone).

I sure am glad I read this post, These are some of the things I will look for WHEN I purchase my next PP/PPK/PPKS. I hope my next one will be a GERMAN PP.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thank you for the reply. Ijust bought yesterday a PPK from 1973. it is not perfect... it has some imperfections in the frame blue in some parts it's not al smooth. ther eis a little scratch on the tip of the barrel externally, looks like the gun has been dropped on the floor, but that's only a scratch. The barrel looks like it almost never shot. I will post a few pictures later and I would like if you can comment on them. nNfortunately I still could not try it at the range. The gun is not perfect but I payed it very little compared to the prices in Italy. Normally a collection Zella-Mehlis PPK in Italy goes 700 to 800 Euros, a PPK like mine Ulm ab Donau manufacture can go aroud 450 Euros if it is comsmetically perfect. I payed mine 250 Euros. I have one only magazine, but I think it is not too difficult to find one.
 

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Sounds as though you got a good buy on the pistol -- that's a decent price, all things considered. A few scratches or marks only show signs that the previous owner thought well enough of the PPK to shoot it. Be sure to post a photo or two; we always like to look at pictures here. Good luck at the range: In boca al lupo ... :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
ok friends, here are some pictures.
As I said the blue on the slide (right part of slide the one with CAT number)
is not perfect. There are imperfections where the blue is not smooth.
Actually I doubt there is a way to fix them unless to reblue all the gun.
The barrel itself is like a mirror.
I have a question here. I never owned a PPK before and I was surprised
to see the firing ping all visible with its own spring. The Makarov (which was inspired by PPK) is complitely different on the slide firing pin part (I also own a Makarov and I was comparing ti to PPK).
So I took a picture also of the firing pin inside the slide. Is it all ok for you ?
I am looking forward for your comments.
thank you very much






 

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Perhaps we should insist that folks on Gunbroker take their photos outside....
Overall, looks like a shooter, and you will find that the .32 is much more pleasant to actually use.
Perfect guns don't get fired much (or not at all).
One caveat, especially if you haven't found it in the literature. When using the decocking feature, hold the hammer back when you apply the safety, and then manually lower the hammer. Repeated hammer blows to the safety cylinder can eventually crack it.
Enjoy your gun.
Moon
 
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