Walther Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I picked up a. 32 auto PPK at the local lawn shop today. I've tried to do some reading on my own, so I'll post what I've found and I'm happy to be educated if I've gotten anything wrong. I'd love to know the story (as best is possible) for this piece of history.

The ejection port is marked with a crown over N, slide has a very faded crown over N. Serial is 244xxx K which I seem to find conflicting information on the age. One chart says this places it as a 1939 pre-war, but the MGMike chart says it's from the 60s. Lots of pitting on the slide but the frame seems great. Very little if any orange/rust appearing, I didn't see it at all until I took a few photos with flash. That may be the camera and not the gun.

The grips are not original from what I can tell... I believe they are from a PPK clone made by Eagle or Indian arms? I'm sure this lowers the value. No original box or test target. Magazine finger extension is brown, to match the wood of the original grips. Came with a second mag of no particular consequence.

I'll probably post what I paid for it if there's interest, but I think I got a hell of a deal. Can anyone confirm the date from the markings and serial? Any value? I fired one magazine through it and it's spot on accurate - drew a line of connecting holes down the target at about 10 ft. But I probably should be sure of what I have before I go running boxes of ammo through a potential collector piece?

Oh, and I thought it was of particular note to find a PPK at all, as usually PPK/s is what shows up. GCA of 1968,of course. Is this very rare? Is it even legal?

Thanks for reading, I know I'm a bit long winded.

Edit: also the only place a serial number appears is on the frame. Is it unusual not to find one on the slide?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Value wise, your pistol has been refinished, so at best, you are looking at shooter prices. Enjoy it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: halfmoonclip

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The Zella Mehlis stamp places the date of manufacture not later than the middle of 1945.
Thanks! I'm happy to have picked up one so old. To add to the info, the price was marked 299. Given how straight it shoots and the historical factor, I don't think I overpaid, even if it's not in collector condition or anything. It's valuable to me personally :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
The magazine finger rest looks original. If the rest of the magazine is also an original ZM Walther made magazine that by itself is worth $100-125.

The grips are for an Indian Arms P.380. Only around a thousand were made so they might actually be worth something to someone who needs them.

No collector value but it should make a great shooter. I use WWB and Remington/UMC in mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The magazine finger rest looks original. If the rest of the magazine is also an original ZM Walther made magazine that by itself is worth $100-125.

The grips are for an Indian Arms P.380. Only around a thousand were made so they might actually be worth something to someone who needs them.

No collector value but it should make a great shooter. I use WWB and Remington/UMC in mine.
Interesting! I was wondering about the grips. Good to know. Any way to tell on the magazine? It's marked with the Walther banner but I didn't see any other markings. It does look a bit older than the other, solid black, magazine that was included. I'll try to get some pictures of those up a little later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
321 Posts
Nice find and hope it makes a great shooter.

The refinishing evidence is in the surface pitting, and faint stamps. Buffers remove some surface roughness and pitting, but at the cost of the stamps like the one under the ejection port. The more buffing, the less pitting but fewer stamps and fainter slide data. If buffing is stopped before all the pitting is gone, when it is reblued you get reblued pitting and a speckled surface like the one you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
Most ZM shooters are going for 500-600 depending on condition. So at 299 you did well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,669 Posts
The Zella Mehlis stamp places the date of manufacture not later than the middle of 1945.
Crown over N, UE I'd be thinking no later than 1940.....the eagle proof was introduced sometime in 1940 I believe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,926 Posts
I'm curious how you can tell it has been refinished? Is there something I should have looked for?
The slide has been polished and buffed almost flat, to the point that the markings are almost gone. Those are usually a lot more visible, sharper and deeper. Also, the edges are all smoothed over. And the color looks parkerized-gray, rather than deep dark blue.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,924 Posts
Crown over N, UE I'd be thinking no later than 1940.....the eagle proof was introduced sometime in 1940 I believe.

You're probably correct. I was just noting the maximum time frame for the Zella-Mehlis roll mark.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,832 Posts
Any way to tell on the magazine? It's marked with the Walther banner but I didn't see any other markings.
It sounds like you have an original ZM Walther magazine. The caliber designation was only added later. The baseplate is made of a brittle plastic so if you plan on doing a lot of shooting you may want to pick up a modern Mec-Gar replacement. I have several and they work great.

Here's a picture of one of my original magazines with just the Walther banner :
 

Attachments

1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top