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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How often do PPK ejectors fail by shooting loose. I've had to replace 2 now and additional replacements are becoming unobtainium. I hesitate to use my .32 or .22 because they could become nothing more than paperweights for me until I find a replacement.


Is there anything I should be looking for that might signal that the ejector was about to launch itself into no mans land. AND what can I do about it before this happens again?

rmc
 

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Do you mean ejector (and slide stop) or extractor? If so, how does the ejector shoot out when sandwiched between the slide and the frame? Was the frame machined improperly to house the piece correctly?
 
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I had one go on a pre-war .32 PPK while shooting aluminum cased ammo. Pistol had been flawless with brass cased ammo. Lost extractor a couple of mags into the aluminum.
 

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The usual causes are incorrect installation (keeper plunger not correctly oriented to the extractor, or one of the extractor spring plungers missing); or incorrect or lame extractor spring (i.e., too short).

Check those first. Aluminum cases have nothing to do with it.

M
 

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Roger, just reporting what happened,
I said "nothing to do with it", but that's not quite right. If you compare the extractor grooves in the cartridge cases, a significant difference might be a causal factor contributing to loss of the extractor, especially if the loss is accompanied by a stovepipe jam.

Aluminum cases also don't have the mass of brass cases and don't eject with as much authority when they strike the ejector in recoil. If the fired case gets pinched in the ejection port when the slide closes it might shove back the extractor enough to dismount it.

However, until the OP says he was using Blazer aluminum, my bet is on the more probable causes mentioned.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wouldn't think extractors would be rare. How about the new ones out of Ft. Smith? Wouldn't they be the same? 1917

Anybody know if the new Ft. Smith PPK extractors would work in one of the older models? It doesn't help me with the .22 (that I use most because of ammunition costs) but knowing that a Ft. Smith extractor would work would allow the .32 to get more workouts.
 

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Mike, any difference in chamber adhesion between the aluminum and brass cases?

Moon
 

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Mike, any difference in chamber adhesion between the aluminum and brass cases?

Moon
I don't know. They are different materials so there's bound to be some difference, but which is more or less, I have no idea.

In a blowback pistol, I doubt if it makes much practical difference. The extractor doesn't pull the fired case out; in order for the slide to cycle, the case has to shove itself rearward like a piston.

A softer, less resilient case that recovers from expansion more slowly (or not at all) might adhere to the chamber walls longer, but the proof is in the pudding: if the slide fully cycles, it's of no consequence. The slide's velocity would probably be reduced, along with the impact when the slide, moving rearward, is halted. Might soften felt recoil, who knows?

Unless there is really a significant difference, rpm would have to be measured by high-speed photography (or in full-auto guns, acoustically).

M

There's not much if any difference between the extractor in .32 vs. .380. Try one and see how it works. Either one can be dressed with stones for a proper fit. The real challenge is to convert one to .22.
 

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Mike, thnx. Can't say I've ever heard of empirical data on the subject.
It does beg the question, aluminum being both lighter and cheaper than brass, why is it not more common as a case material? For military purposes the weight issue would add up, as would the cost.
From a circumstantial point of view, there has to be a reason. Also, in my experience, aluminum is Berdan primed, which seems counter intuitive; two holes, stamped in anvil.
Moon
 

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Moon: Why is aluminum not in more common use for case material? I don't know. Maybe someone here knows.

Why are aluminum cases Berdan primed? I don't know that either, but I strongly suspect the main reason is to discourage reloading them.

M
 

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...Why are aluminum cases Berdan primed? I don't know that either, but I strongly suspect the main reason is to discourage reloading them.

M
Yeah, that makes sense, tho' Berdan priming has always mystified me; reputedly German wartime ammo was Berdan.

Our late range officer would have tried to reload about anything.
Moon
 

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One might think the answer lies somewhere in the science of metallurgy, but the real reason is the military tradition of saying "no brass or ammo" after live fire;)
 

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Yeah, that makes sense, tho' Berdan priming has always mystified me; reputedly German wartime ammo was Berdan.

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Practically all WWII-era military small arms ammunition was Berdan primed. Much of it still is. US-made ammo was a standout exception.

Berdan was an American, but the US generally did not use the primer he invented. We preferred Boxer primers, invented by a Brit. Perversely the UK and Commonwealth used mostly Berdan, though some have now switched to Boxer.

Of course Berdan can be reloaded, but decapping is slow and awkward because the flash holes are small and off-center. As far as I can recall, the Swiss are about the only ones who reload Berdan military cases-- but they do it in a factory, on an industrial assembly-line basis, as one might expect in a country that mass-produces cuckoo clocks.

M
 

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Well, CCI Blazer's are aluminum cased and Berdan primed, so those weak case can't be reloaded (unless some fool would go through the trouble).
These cases are very rough and dull on the outside. Could bind upon expansion and ejection.
I think this is what the he was talking about. Never had a problem with them in 9mm, 45acp or .380, but never shot any out of a Walther in any caliber.
Just a cheaper alternative for range ammo that CCI made.
 

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Just a cheaper alternative for range ammo that CCI made.
I think cost was the whole justification for it. It worked well enough in pistol calibers.

I have nothing against the Swiss. I'm very fond of their small arms, and Victorinox is legendary.

M
 
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