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Discussion Starter #1
I am new here and I am not a pistol shooter. A friend of mine would like to sell his Walter PPK and I think there will likely be a lot of experts here who can help with more information

he has no presentation or cleaning kit - did the original come with that ?
This gun is UNFIRED since new
what is the best medium to sell this now ?

thanks in advance
Ben
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you for confirming that. Existing owner is 76 years old and have had it since late 70’s.
it’s in 9mm Luger and unfired.
any idea of price in current market as a guideline ? Please
Ben
 

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The slide says 9 mm Kurtz. Kurtz is German for short. So it is a 9 mm short also more commonly known as .380 ACP

Pudge
Know-it-all from Germany ;):
According to the current German spelling, "tz" after a consonant - here r - is forbidden, only "z" can be written, ie only "kurz" is correct. Only for ancestral, old family names "tz" is allowed after a consonant.
Adjectives like "kurz" (short) must be written in lower case in the sentence. But if they belong to a name or a designation, they can also be capitalized.
Therefore, according to German spelling, both "9mm kurz" and "9mm Kurz" are allowed as caliber specifications.
End of the lesson in German spelling.😄
 

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According to the current German spelling, "tz" after a consonant - here r - is forbidden, only "z" can be written, ie only "kurz" is correct.
Is kurz still pronounced kurtz ?
 

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I always found it interesting that the Zella Mehlis pistols in "9mm kurz" were only marked with "9mm" on the slide. Any idea when and why Walther started adding "kurz"?
 

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To sell it is ultimately up to whatever legal venues you have available in your locale or state. Know them first, and then consider the options.
You may consider offering it here (with stated price), but read this first: Trading Post Rules of Engagement: Please read BEFORE you...

Pawn shops and local gun stores offer a deal (the latter offer a little more than the former), and could be quicker, but they have to meet overhead costs as well as trying to earn a little on the deal as well so you'll often get less than a collector may give you.

Whatever venue you select, make sure you abide by the laws, it keeps us all safe and prevents giving 'ammunition' to the anti-gun crowd.
 

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Love the German correction. I am of Deutsch descent and have studied the language for a few years. Indeed the correct word is "kurz." One the other hand the Deutsch word for long is "lange" and the "e' is pronounced and not silent like in English. However, NEVER confuse Schiessen and Scheissen; our German scholar will tell you why!
 

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;)
Love the German correction. I am of Deutsch descent and have studied the language for a few years. Indeed the correct word is "kurz." One the other hand the Deutsch word for long is "lange" and the "e' is pronounced and not silent like in English. However, NEVER confuse Schiessen and Scheissen; our German scholar will tell you why!
Continuation of the know-it-all from Germany:
Within a sentence, "schießen" and "scheißen" are written in lower case and not in upper case as in the quoted reply because they are verbs.
Only when I put the corresponding article "das" in front of a verb and thus turn the verb into a noun do I have to capitalize the verb, that is, "das Schießen" and "das Scheißen".
If I put a possessive pronoun in front of a verb, I can do also capitalize a verb like "dein Schießen" and "dein Scheißen". "dein" = your.
End of the German lesson about "schießen und scheißen". 😄
P. S. For only English speaking readers, who don't own a German dictionary:
"schießen"= to shoot, "scheißen" = to shit ;)
 

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One the other hand the Deutsch word for long is "lange" and the "e' is pronounced and not silent like in English.
By the way, the opposite of the adjective "kurz" is actually "lang", because regarded in isolation, "lange" is an adverb. In attributive use, on the other hand, the inflected adjective "lang" has different endings, e.g. "ein langer Lauf", "eine lange Pistole", or "ein langes Griffstück". If everybody is already confused, I can stop right now. :p
 

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To answer the OP question whom I’m sure wasn’t interested in fine points of the German language, the best place to sell this is Gunbroker.com

This gun is factory engraved and gold plated.
But not having a presentation case or even the factory boxing hurts it.

It’s a PPK/S so that hurts it value.

The grip is interesting, I can’t tell from the pictures but I would lean towards it being the normal white plastic grip that has had the cartouche applied to. But it’s possible it’s ivory. The cartouche appears to gold, but I can’t make out what are the “stones” in the picture. Are they real diamonds are some faking techniques forcing the metal to look like stones? I just can’t tell
Would like to see close ups of the cartouche with the white part showing as well to say more.

To get top value for the gun obviously someone with an F name needs to be bidding. Actually two people with F names. Hahahaha

I have seen similar guns sell on GB in the 22-3500 range. I would expect yours on the lower end due to not having box.

As much as I hate the /S variant and despise the .380 caliber I would give $1500 if you wanted a fast easy. transaction

You can see my thoughts on ZM Walther engraved guns here

 

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Maybe we as German speaking members should ask the administration / moderation for a new sub-forum for questions and problems of the German language. For example, one could name it:
"Questions, irritations, inconsistencies concerning the German language for confused forum members who are not able to speak German."
Or very short and more memorable:
"German language? Oops ..."
😄
P. S. This is my last OT contribution on this topic.
 

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By the way, the opposite of the adjective "kurz" is actually "lang", because regarded in isolation, "lange" is an adverb. In attributive use, on the other hand, the inflected adjective "lang" has different endings, e.g. "ein langer Lauf", "eine lange Pistole", or "ein langes Griffstück". If everybody is already confused, I can stop right now. :p
Since I am 69 years old and have been studying for three years or more, I appreciate your incite. I am of primarily German descent. The language was not offered in high school. My vocabulary is fairly strong, but I have some grammar to learn. The use of einer, einen and einem perplex me, but I know that one is for the direct object and another is for the indirect object. I need emersion in the language. Bist du gesund?
 

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By the way, the opposite of the adjective "kurz" is actually "lang", because regarded in isolation, "lange" is an adverb. In attributive use, on the other hand, the inflected adjective "lang" has different endings, e.g. "ein langer Lauf", "eine lange Pistole", or "ein langes Griffstück". If everybody is already confused, I can stop right now. :p
Mir hamm noch lange nich genuch!
 
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