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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I shot it today for the first time. It's quite accurate, I found and the recoil isn't all that bad. The only reason I bought it was because it was at what I thought was a good price. Ball ammo, I was impressed. Shot about an inch low, which is no problem. Also shot my PPK .32, which is way left. And the sight is drifted over..That is a problem.



 

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Gene congratulations on your new purchase, if you try different brands of factory Ball ammunition you will see that the point of impact will shift. This is to due to a difference in OAL, and powder charge and type used, the bullet’s contact with the rifling of your barrel. Good luck in finding the load your PPK likes.
 

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Gene,

Good looking SS PPK. As with older S&W snub nosed revolvers you can bring the poi in with different ammo, or loadings (it was the only way to adjust those). But as DE points out an inch low it dead on. I would wait on sight changes until you really get to know the weapon. Three or four range trips should give you a good idea if it is the gun, or you. Then change as needed.

Duncan
 

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congrats on your new ppk. they are easy to carry and fun to shoot. My 68 ppk is also a 380 . have had it for a long time and it's not going anywhere.
 

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Beyond your ammo, point of impact (vs aim) is also affected by sight picture, sight alignment, trigger pull (amount of finger on trigger) and range to target. You want to group consistently before changing anything.
 

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Forgot to add that's a nice SS Ranger. I've got one just like it. I'm guessing mine is about a year older than your's based on serial number. Mine has a 08# and I think it was made in 1996.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Forgot to add that's a nice SS Ranger. I've got one just like it. I'm guessing mine is about a year older than your's based on serial number. Mine has a 08# and I think it was made in 1996.

I think that's about right, but it's so hard to track down Ranger SNs.



On another board, talking about P-series guns, a guy said about three years ago he bought an Interarms stainless PPK/S in .32 acp. He pad $300 for it just because he liked it (which is why most of us buy them) and because he had the extra cash. He thought it was priced reasonably because it wasn't a .380, he's not a fan of the .32. Anyway, I told him I thought he had a pretty rare PPK-S and he got a great deal on it.
 

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... Also shot my PPK .32, which is way left. And the sight is drifted over..That is a problem...

Which way is the sight pushed over? If it's shooting to the left, it should have been moved to the right.
Actually, if it is way left, chances are it's a trigger finger issue. Experiment with some dry snaps, and vary how much finger you're using; pad, distal joint, etc.
Moon
 

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I've found that of the many of the PP series pistols I've owned (only have 3 now) will usually shoot close to point of aim when the sights were at mechanical zero. I define mechanical zero as the rear sight notch centered directly over the loaded chamber signal pin. In fact, this is not surprising given the PP series' fixed barrel and tight slide. Also, if you have the original test target, assume that grouping was done with a mechanical zero.

If I'm close to point of aim, I will not adjust the rear sight because I can't be certain if the delta from point of aim is because of me, my pistol, my ammo or my range to target.

Finally, if/when my PP series is on target, I let some lock tight slip into the dove tail because "rough" handling can move the rear sight.

PS: Plus, mechanical zero just looks better;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Which way is the sight pushed over? If it's shooting to the left, it should have been moved to the right.
Actually, if it is way left, chances are it's a trigger finger issue. Experiment with some dry snaps, and vary how much finger you're using; pad, distal joint, etc.
Moon

It was drifted right, pretty far, but not enough. Had a shooting buddy shoot it to see if it was me on the trigger, but it printed left for him, too.


Tapped it further right, and it's center now. I'm happy with that.
 

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What distance are you shooting at ? My PP's and PPK's of various vintanges all seem to zero at around seven yards.
 

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Gene L, not meaning to argue, but I've seen many people make Glocks shoot left, just from how they're pulling the trigger. A buddy got a great group, 3" left of the bull, with a 42 that is dead on for me.
In any case, if you're content, shoot some more and enjoy your gun.
Concur with PPs; usually my PPKs zero with the rear sight in the center.
It's a good thing you didn't have a Ft. Smith example...;)

Moon
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yep, Moon, I'm one of those who shoot a Glock left. I know it's a problem, gun was shooting fine for the range instructor, but left for me. So upon my insistence he pushed the sight to the right. Grouped where it's supposed to, dead center. I've had to do this with every Glock pistol I've owned because the way I learned to pull the trigger was learned from DA revolvers, and it's instinctive by now. Too much finger, I know the problem, but solve that by moving the sights to the right.



My buddy who is a pretty good shot, shot the .32 and it shot left for him. He's shot my Glocks before, and they shot right for him. Which told me that the problem wasn't me, it was the gun.
 
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