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Hello. I am new to the forum and looking forward to learning more about my grandfathers Walther PP brought back from WWII (as the story was told).

A few questions I am looking for some help answering:
1. The serial number on the slide does not match the serial number behind the trigger. What does this tell you?
2. Serial numbers are: 393589p and 387850p. Can you tell when this was manufactured and where?
3. There are no other markings other than an "AC" under the first serial number. What does that mean? I keep hearing about proofing markings, but I can not find any. Only other markings are on the mag: PP 7,65 m/m.

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!

Jim
USAF Veteran and proud grandson of a WWII Glider Crew Chief!
 

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Have you got any pictures of the pistol, both side that you can put up? There is also a sticky at the beginning of this section and possibly in the FAQ section that tells you how to get started on assessing what you have. .32 cal PP of some kind. There are some real experts here on telling you what you likely have. The pistol were originally manufactured with matching serial numbers on the slide and frame....but, there may be more to the history here. Welcome. M1911
 

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AC = Walther/Zella-Mehlis

The gun was assembled from parts found in the Walther factory, when the US-army captured Zella-Mehlis in 1945. That's why the numbers do not match and no proof marks are visible.
 

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So how many of these pistols exist? What happened? Who assembled these pistols from parts. An armorer or did GIs just grab parts and put the pistols together. Why were parts not matched to serial number wise. Did these pistols later require gunsmith work in order to them fully functional? This is pretty interesting and I've read of it before but don't remember how organized this effort was. Would this be the factory and machinery that was later removed to France.

For a short while when I was in first in Nam I was one of the guys out- processing GIs who had finished their tour of duty. Their military pay currency was converted to dollars and any war trophies checked for paperwork. Items could be taken home but had to be cleared before hand. Most guys did not have any paper work and had to leave whatever they had. I remember many Viet Cong flags and NVA flags, maps and papers, helmets, etc. There were thousands of these kinds of things in a big pile, flags with bullet holes, blood, etc. Some were huge flags that had been captured. They were probably destroyed. I do not remember firearms but there might have been some. M1911
 

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You'll want to read this ...

P 38 & PP-PPK Collector Forum

... from forum member Ron Clarin, who also is one of the moderators of the P38 Forum. It's a terrific look at what happened when the Third Army rolled into the Walther plant at Zella Mehlis in April of 1945. The pistols that were assembled after that point are often called cigarette guns because the workers would put them together and get smokes in return.
 

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Here's an example ac code mismatch PP from the Pancho Gun Collection. The one shown below had red SS Shooting Team grips. This weekend at the Ohio Civil War Show we found an "AC" magazine with the "W" stamp for unhardened feed lips. It had a 1st type red flat side plastic magazine extension that was added by a GI at the Walther factory. I'd imagine there were once matching grips. See attachment for magazine.
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