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Discussion Starter #1
I am about to buy a Walther P-99 but i have seen several P99s field stripped and saw some plastic guide rods bended, others chewed, and they feel weak when i handled them so before i take the plunge... Where can i order stainless steel gide rods for the P-99? (don't tell me SW) I checked Wolff springs co. and they don't carry replacements parts for the P99! Some light on this Plz!
 

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Sprinco makes a product with a steel guide rod.  It might address your concerns, but I have heard mixed reviews regarding its effectiveness in reducing perceived recoil.  

http://www.sprinco.com/recoil.html
 

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I've got about 1200 flawless rounds thru my .40 P99 and my guide rod is still going strong.

Why not try the stock setup first, and replace as necessary when the stock setup doesn't meet your expectations?

-stunks
 

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ikiddp5,
I had the exact same concern as yourself when I purchased my first P99, liked everything about the pistol except that flexing polymer guide rod, but finally assumed the same mindset on this as stunksinatl; bought the pistol several years ago, a lot of rounds of various types through it, including quite a few Corbon +Ps, found that the guide rod does the job, still don't like the way it flexes, but evidently the design engineers at Walther know what they are doing. I plan on buying a metal one as soon as I locate a supplier, not because I think it needs it needs, but just because it still bothers me the way it looks like it flexes. Interestingly enough, just recently bought a P99C and the guide rod on that looks more rigid.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks BreakerDave, I'll check up Sprinco, I'm not so worried about recoil but the integrity of the guide thus It may suit me fine.
Stunksinatl I hope that your Guide doesn't break at 2,001 rds... you know... Murpht law, in the moment you need it most, it may break.
Stevehf48 I agree with everything you say... including " it still bothers me the way it looks like it flexes"
Thanks all for your comments. Anyone has more ideas on this?
 

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The guide rod is unstressed inside the P99 when assembled. When torn down they simply act as a keeper for the spring. That's it. Going to metal adds weight with no real benefit IMHO.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (toeball @ Nov. 02 2005,08:54)]The guide rod is unstressed inside the P99 when assembled. When torn down they simply act as a keeper for the spring. That's it. Going to metal adds weight with no real benefit IMHO.
+1, toeball's got it right!  


-stunks
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I've never seen a walther P-99 guide rod broken, but have seen pictures of Glocks' guide rod broken... Is it worth risking?
How much weight would add an metal guide? Is it so expensive a metal rod? Would the P-99 not work right if i put a metal guide rod in it?....
 

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Toeball,......is right on the money......the guide rod does just that......."it guides" the spring during a compression cycle..and nothing more. It adds no structural support to the slide or gun.

The polymer rod is quite adequate to do this job. I doubt Walther would have used this type of material if there was going to be a high chance of failure.

You can buy metal if you can find one and it makes you feel safer............but my guide rod has taken over 6, 000 rds of Speer Gold dot .40 cal. ammo without a problem.

JF.
 

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Seems like toeball has hit on the exact point, appears there is really no stress or force being applied to that rod, merely being used to maintain the position of the spring. Now if only the mecahnical engineers that designed it had a public relations guy looking over their shoulders, they may have realized that we all would be more comfortable with a metal rod or a more rigid rigid plastic one.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (sniper350 @ Nov. 02 2005,17:05)]... I doubt Walther would have used this type of material if there was going to be a high chance of failure.
...

JF.
I replaced the plastic guide rod on my P99 with a Sprinco and all is working just fine. I haven't noticed any significant reduction in recoil, but that's not why I bought it. My original rod flexed significantly after 5k rounds or so, and it bugged me.

That being said, Toeball is right on the money when the handgun is assembled. The rod only sees stress when the slide is removed.

Sniper, floorplates.
 

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MLB......... I am with you on the floor plates


But that was not a mistake in selecting the material...but a big mistake in the design -IMO. Many other companies are using Polymer Magazine floor plates....without incident.

Also , it is worth noting........that it was S&W that started messing around with the magazine design to try to cure the lock back problem with early models. Walther was against these changes--- stronger mag springs-- indents in the mag. body to force the leading bullet away from the lock back spring..........along with a change in the mag followers.

Wather wanted the magazine left alone........and changes made to the lock back spring design, but S&W wouldn't listen.
So its hard to say who is to blame for the magazine floor plate failures.

I believe they should have been made of steel........but that doesn't mean polymer won't work if the design accounted for recoil and shooters "palming" their guns while shooting.


JF
 

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Sniper, I was just taking a cheap shot.
The replacement floorplates I recieved are holding up just fine, and they look exactly the same as the originals (aside from the S&W markings as opposed to the Walther ones). I imagine that is was a problem with the polymer itself, likely a Mec-Gar issue.
 
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