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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased a PK380 about 8 months ago and last night while i was cleaning it, i think i might of run into a problem but i'm not sure. I know a lot about firearms, but i am no expert on PK380's so i thought i would ask the community. Any advice or information is appreciated. My problem is after i was done cleaning it, i reassembled it and pulled the slide back a few times as i always do. Maybe i just never noticed it, but the 380 shakes when the hammer is back, regardless of if the safety is on or not. If i put the hammer down it doesn't remedy the situation but if i pull the trigger, it's back to it's normal rigid self. Is this normal? Did i just not notice this before? Checked the manual and of course it doesn't mention anything about it so it landed me here.

Thanks!
 

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"… shakes when the hammer is back, regardless of if the safety is on or not.
If i put the hammer down it doesn't remedy the situation,
but if i pull the trigger, it's back to it's normal rigid self. "

I think you mean that shaking it with a normal grip causes rattling of the slide.
Substantial shaking of the slide on mine is normal. But when the hammer is down,
it shakes very little. If the hammer is back, and I press forward on the slide,
this also quiets the slide rattle.
The loose fit between slide and frame is noted by others, so it appears to be "normal".

I see now that I badly misread a comment by R_che concerning guide rod gouging :
"the slide action is perhaps the sloppiest feeling slide I have ever used ...
I am wondering if the looser slide/frame … "


He's clearly referring to the slop/play from slide to frame, not barrel to slide.
When the hammer falls, the slide can be in different positions due to the slide-frame play.
The sight picture is taken along the slide, whether the slide is to one side of
the play, or somehow angled within that play.

This factor in accuracy depends on movement of the slide as, and after, the trigger is pulled.
The complex dynamics during strike and initial shock might not be consistently biased.
The bullet is gone during 99 percent of the recoil cycle, but the 1 percent is the issue.

R_che indicates that the groups he fires are not on par with his blowback PPK/S.
The effects of PK slide-frame play could be one cause of this.

This slop/play bugs people, and it might have some practical effect.
I'd say that several production cost issues factor into the slide fit,
but it should be reviewed, even if only for the user impressions.
.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thank you so much! This is my main carry weapon 70% of the time with an extra clip so i wanted to make sure. It is just a perfect size for carry and is a good looking handgun in my opinion. I figured since it chambers a round correctly and is rigid after i put the hammer down afterwards (a fact i typed wrong in my initial message), that it was safe regardless of if there was an issue or not. Not knowing if it would cycle correctly was the main problem i guess. What good is a semi-auto if you can only fire one shot consistently? I can see how people don't like the fact that it rattles, as you mentioned, but it is an affordable shooter. I will try pushing forward on the slide if i decide i want the hammer back.

Thank you again!

Edit: I own a Walther P99 and the slide/frame shaking is not an issue whatsoever, so i agree with you that it was probably a production cost factor, as the P99 is substantially more expensive.
 

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I only pressed forward on the slide to check the effect on rattling.


I only want a close-range fight gun to fire on demand for at least two mags.
Beyond production costs, large clearances can be an advantage, to a point.
Kalashnikov demonstrated the dominance of function over fit and form.

When I was handed an m60 (as the newbie), the bolt would not even open (sand/rust).
The armorer had to pound on the bolt handle to get it loose, then he kept it for a day.

A 20-lb paper weight in a combat zone; and normally they would jam every 50 rounds.
The m16 was not much better.
.

 

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Same here in my military expierences also. Close tolerences on the M16/M4 made them sieze-up after only a few rounds. Diving in and out of cover you might not realize how much sand you're getting in the gun, until it's to late. Kalashnikov designed in alot of slop on his AK47 platform.
 
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