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The Ft. Smith pistols, assuming that they are ever available, are a non-starter for me; I will stick with the hundreds of Walther, Manurhin, and Interarms/Ranger pistols available at any given moment if I want another PPK(/S). Thankfully, the venerable PP is only available as a Deutschland Walther or French Manurhin. A Ft. Smith version of that Art Deco gem would really be an affront, IMO.
Hello. I'll first say I'm not a PP collector or even owner. I'll probably take that step as the P99 served as kind of a gateway drug into the Walther world for me.

I'm curious why you would make such a statement. Would you expect the older ones to shoot better than the new ones? Are you coming from an historical significance perspective? Collectability? Nostalgia for the guns of your youth perhaps?

Consider me looking to get educated.
 

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Balog, your picture looks better than the earlier examples. Still not a thing of beauty, but better.
The Deutschers are a little twitchy about exporting armaments since that unpleasantness in the '40s.

I have two Interarms .32s, a PPK and PPK/s...the prices are going nowhere but up, and it isn't what I would carry anyway. We here have made the .32s pricey!

The Beretta Tomcat is actually a neat little pistol, if you really want a .32.
The slide is heavier than in the past, and it is more pleasant to shoot as a result.
Moon
Halfmoon, The Tomcats used to have a rep from slide or frame cracking if I remember correctly. Sounds like they are now a little beefier???. Is the cracking issue a thing of the past?
 

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Yeah, the PPQ was my gateway drug, but soon I discovered a whole range of old-school drugs that I much prefer.

If "shooting" includes reliability of design, operation/cycling, quality of materials, manufacturing, fit, finish, etc. then, yes, I do expect more and better from those older guns. Who knows about accuracy and precision of the bullet leaving the barrel, and newer might be better, but only to really expert shooters (i.e., not a hack like me). History, nostalgia, collectability, etc. certainly play a role for me, but I am too old to yearn for my lost youth, which was all about Colt and S&W wheel guns :) As for the PP, that was the original, and I personally love the lines of that gun. Interarms, S&W, and now Ft. Smith never attempted the PP, undoubtedly because of changing fashions (and perhaps James Bond) and potential market share more than anything else. An early Manurhin PP with that fabulous polish and deep, deep bluing will never be replicated, nor does it need to be with all of them out there waiting for a new chance to do what they do best. My $0.02, 100%
Thanks for the reply GeoNole. I guess I'm more of a "shooter" than a collector.

While I appreciate the things you mention I probably gravitate more to the side of shooting characteristics, i.e. reliability, durability, accuracy, my ability to shoot the gun well, ...

To each there own though.

After lurking on this PP forum for a while, I get the impression the PP series has almost reached museum status. Too much history to tolerate changes. To cool to go away. Due to this, the gun seemingly cannot evolve the way 1911s have over the years --- I don't hear many people pining for the pre-1924 guns that were produced before all those unnecessary and ugly changes ruined it.

I agree you will almost assuredly never see a PP-series gun produced again with the fit and beautiful blue finish of the best examples.

You may though at some point, see examples with better DA triggers, ability to feed hollow points, a more durable finish, better sights, ... all things that would make the PP/PPK a more practical and in some ways "better" firearm.

I wish Walther luck with this new PPK. They are in a tough spot. They cannot possibly produce a gun with the finish of the old ones without charging more than most consumers would want to pay. They cannot "evolve" the gun into a more practical defensive tool without alienating hard core PPK fans.

Maybe they should "evolve" the gun but call it something else... PPZ or something like that.

I look forward to getting my hands on the new version and seeing what it can do.

Regards.
 

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Tomcats are beefier but not necessarily a thing of the past. I personally think most of the cracking issues are caused by people using hotter than recommended ammo and shooting them like they're range guns. I have 2 and neither have cracked.
Thanks for the responses guys.

If one gets unlucky and has a frame crack is Beretta decent about replacing it?
 

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The new PPK/S indeed looks nicer than expected, at least the stainless version. I wonder how the blued (should I say black?) versions look like in the meantime. Those first shown models had a rather ugly finish and reminded me of a cheap toy.

Whether and when the models will be on the market doesn't matter to me fortunately. Due to the very unattractive calibre I will probably limit myself to only one exemplar for my collection anyway. I assume that the new models will not be officially offered in Europe; so far there are no indications at all. Probably they will have to be imported individually.
Nothing looks nicer than a beautifully blued gun

That being said, I'd rather Walther use a more modern finish and do it well than deliver a poorly done blued pistol. I suspect the processes and talent needed to first rate bluing are there any more, at least on an industrial scale.
 
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