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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Got the new striker in today. Doesn't seem to have the heat treat issues of the previous striker, Walther shipped it via a priority 2-Day envelope, not the same one the PDP plates come in which is nice.
 

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So, what led you to believe there were heat treat issues of the striker that came with the gun? Not saying it wasn't the cause of the premature failure, but I don't recall that being discussed in this thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
Since this is such a funny thread I ask that you please forgive me as I laugh and comment on the OP's determination that the Walther PDP is a POS and how quickly he maneuvered to the Glock.

I've never seen a more odd bunch of folks than the Glock fanbois, especially the new Glock owners; they're the ones you see showing up at the range with their girlfriend, holding their Glock pistol packed safely away in it's factory case and a fresh pair of safety glasses, looking to rent a lane and buy the cheapest box of 50 and one whole target. Whether on purpose or not, many of these Glock aficionados remain blissfully unaware of Glock's history of failures; they instead back up their love for these pistols based on the numbers used by LE (well duh - most Police departments are on tight budgets and Glock practically gives their pistols away to LE), and are also quick to note the many aftermarket products available which gives them the ability to change their Glock pistol into their own idea of what a Glock pistol should be, e.g., they "build" (aka, "assemble") the "Gucci" Glocks, adorned with TiN golfball milled barrels, slides with windows machined out of them, laser engraved frames, finger groove deletions, large compensators, etc. My question is...if they're so great to begin with, why do they need hundreds if not more dollars worth of "enhancements"?

It took me many years to even try a Glock pistol, then by virtue of opportunity after opportunity to purchase them at bargain prices I ended up owning 13 different model Glock pistols at the same time. I suppose I had hopes of becoming all "Glockish", but in the end I found them to have the absolute worst ergonomics of any pistol manufactured. In the end I was faced with a choice...do I, 1) hang onto these pistols because all the fanbois say that they're the greatest, or 2) use my own experiences to steer me towards something else? It was #2. Thusfar I've sold/traded off 9 of the 13...4 to go! And I think I know what I'll do with the $$ recouped from the sales of those remaining POS, I mean Glocks...buy more mags for my Walther PDP ;)

(LOL)
I quite enjoy the Glock ergonomics, the PDP was nice but I found the grip angle on the Glock to personally be more appealing. To say I'm a Glock fanboi is disingenuous considering this will be the first Glock I have owned. Previous carry guns included the VP9, FN 509 tac, and LTT Elite 92 G. All of which I traded or sold for various reasons I found them unappealing. Good luck finding fullsize PDP mags, and if you do, enjoy paying a premium for a Walther branded Mec-Gar OEM mag with a different floorplate.( These mags go for $26-$30 ish dollars and Walther wants $50, no thanks.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
So, what led you to believe there were heat treat issues of the striker that came with the gun? Not saying it wasn't the cause of the premature failure, but I don't recall that being discussed in this thread.
After looking at my striker more and comparing it with the previous issues the Canik Tp9 strikers had (which where built to the technical data package that Walther sent them from what I've been told) it exhibits the same symptoms of a striker that has been heat treated to a hardness that exceeded the spec. You can see this in the cracked and somewhat flaky surface of the metal.
 

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After looking at my striker more and comparing it with the previous issues the Canik Tp9 strikers had (which where built to the technical data package that Walther sent them from what I've been told) it exhibits the same symptoms of a striker that has been heat treated to a hardness that exceeded the spec. You can see this in the cracked and somewhat flaky surface of the metal.
Thanks for the photo. Seems like it probably just was a defective part after all. It happens.
 

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Finally got 500 rounds of 9mm and upon getting to the range found out my striker had broken sometime in between me zeroing the gun a month ago and my dry fire practice up until this point. I've potentially been carrying around a dead gun for up to a month. Check your strikers boys. Come Monday I'm calling Walther, getting a new striker and then dumping this POS, Should've bought a Glock from the start. View attachment 98082
All is well, the Issue has been rectified by this lovely peanut butter colored blaster.
View attachment 98106
Could of had an HK ;)
 

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So can someone explain to me what would cause the striker to break during dry fire and how a snap cap/dummy round would help protect it? Just having a hard time picturing what would cause this.
Normally the firing pin or striker travels forward until it contacts the primer and decelerates as it dents the primer. All of the force is applied to the tip of the striker and it is probably not as “sudden” as dry firing. A snap cap replicates the function of a cartridge and primer.

When dry firing, the shoulder of the striker contacts the end of the firing pin channel. The force is more extreme because there is no “cushioning” effect from the primer. Over time this causes more stress in the metal and causes the failure.

Normally this would be a concern for someone doing a lot of dry firing over a long period of time and you would want to replace snap caps and strikers on a schedule. In the case of the OP, this was a defective part. This is why people recommend firing 1,000 rounds through a pistol before relying on it.
 

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Normally the firing pin or striker travels forward until it contacts the primer and decelerates as it dents the primer. All of the force is applied to the tip of the striker and it is probably not as “sudden” as dry firing. A snap cap replicates the function of a cartridge and primer.

When dry firing, the shoulder of the striker contacts the end of the firing pin channel. The force is more extreme because there is no “cushioning” effect from the primer. Over time this causes more stress in the metal and causes the failure.

Normally this would be a concern for someone doing a lot of dry firing over a long period of time and you would want to replace snap caps and strikers on a schedule. In the case of the OP, this was a defective part. This is why people recommend firing 1,000 rounds through a pistol before relying on it.
Gotcha, I can see that. Thanks for the explanation!
 

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Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Could of had an HK ;)
Had an HK, wasn't fond of a company that took 5 years to redesign a magazine follower so the pistol could accommodate the original 17 rounds it should've had in the first place, especially when compared side by side to 17 round mags whose dimensions were smaller than the vp9 mags.
 
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