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Discussion Starter #1
Guys it seems like the Estonian police as well as a bunch of other Euro cops are using the P99Q.


Is this just another name for what we in America call the PPQ M1 variant? If not, what are the differences? Seems like it is supplanting the old P99AS in service with many forces.


Thoughts?
 

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It is not really a PPQ, but it's closely related. Closer than cousins; more like step-siblings...

From the wikipedia article in the P99:

Many of the alterations found in the Fabryka Broni Radom P99 RAD variant were also applied in the Walther P99Q pistol. The P99Q is a designated police pistol, which has been certified according to the Technical Specifications (TR) of the German Police (Technische Richtlinie Pistolen im Kaliber 9mm x 19, Revision January 2008).[17] The P99Q is exclusively manufactured for German and foreign police departments and is not available on the civilian market.[18] The P99Q has a partially pre-loaded internal striker trigger mechanism that conforms to the Technical Specifications (TR) of the German Police. When the trigger is pulled, the striker is fully cocked and released, firing the pistol. Trigger travel is approximately 13 mm (0.5 in) with a trigger reset of 6 mm (0.2 in) and a trigger pull of approximately 32 N (7.2 lbf). The trigger pull is consistent in length and force from the first shot to the last. The Technical Specifications (TR 2008) of the German Police also demand an accuracy of fire for a 10-shot group with German Police certified 9×19mm Parabellum ammunition[19] at 25 m (27 yd) (R100)[20] of ≤ 16 cm (6.3 in). This equals an accuracy of fire of ≤ 22 minute of angle (MOA) or ≤ 6.4 mrad. The grip frame has an integrated mounting MIL-STD-1913 (Picatinny) rail for attaching tactical lights and laser sighting devices.​

Basically, the PPQ is a P99Q with a much nicer trigger.
 

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Interesting. So basically the P99Q is sort of a "lawyer" type harder trigger pull version of the PPQ only sold to police and military units for safety purposes?


Strange... wonder if any units over there use the actual PPQ M1 or even M2? Man, the modern Walther designations sure make for some confusion!!!
 

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Interesting. So basically the P99Q is sort of a "lawyer" type harder trigger pull version of the PPQ only sold to police and military units for safety purposes?
From what I understand, Germany has strict guidelines on what pistols are even allowed to be used as police and military pistols, with parameters around trigger pull weight, length, reset distance, etc.

I'd say it's more than likely that it was made specifically to win police and military contracts that the P99 AS or PPQ could not. I don't believe the PPQ was ever meant to be a military or police pistol. Even looking at German police agencies, I believe all of them that use or used the P99, used the DAO model. The P99Q offers a pistol with a shorter trigger pull length, a lighter pull weight, and still keeps the double strike capability of the DAO P99, which is beneficial if there is a failure to return to battery issue, or the first trigger pull doesn't set off the primer.

Strange... wonder if any units over there use the actual PPQ M1 or even M2? Man, the modern Walther designations sure make for some confusion!!!
The only agency I've heard of that uses the PPQ is the Taiwan Police. Very rarely do you see a police or military agency adopt a SAO pistol lately.
 

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The p99Q is a model that's been around for a number of years, it's not really anything new. And yes, it was produced specifically to fit a demand.
As far as I know, they've never really shipped them stateside in any kind of quantity.

When I first heard of them, I thought that it might be Walther making a combination pistol, or that it was a new release on the p99. Sadly no.

As for the PPQ and the "much" better trigger.... I'm not arguing your opinion, I'm just saying.... less than 1/8th of an inch in the reset and a tad bit more tactile feel isn't "much" to me ;)
 

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From what I understand, Germany has strict guidelines on what pistols are even allowed to be used as police and military pistols, with parameters around trigger pull weight, length, reset distance, etc.

I'd say it's more than likely that it was made specifically to win police and military contracts that the P99 AS or PPQ could not. I don't believe the PPQ was ever meant to be a military or police pistol. Even looking at German police agencies, I believe all of them that use or used the P99, used the DAO model. The P99Q offers a pistol with a shorter trigger pull length, a lighter pull weight, and still keeps the double strike capability of the DAO P99, which is beneficial if there is a failure to return to battery issue, or the first trigger pull doesn't set off the primer.


The only agency I've heard of that uses the PPQ is the Taiwan Police. Very rarely do you see a police or military agency adopt a SAO pistol lately.
Aren't Glocks considered single action?
 

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The striker on a Glock is not pre cocked, hence it is technically a double action.


Or so I've been told multiple times over the decades.
 

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Glocks come from the time period when strike fires were designed to partially cock the striker, without locking it back into the fully clocked position when the slide is moved rearward.

Hence the term "a half cocked Glock".

The trigger pull on these types, does indeed push the striker into the position where it will then release, and spring forward.

The reason why they are listed as single action is because pulling the trigger back does not move the striker, if it is cocked. In similar fashion to the old sa revolvers, you have to manually move the mechanism to cock or partially cock it. In this case, the slide.
In other words, the trigger does not prep the striker, the slide does, therefore it's single action.
Verses double action pistols where if it is uncocked, you start to pull the trigger back, and the hammer and trigger start to move, in relation to the trigger pull.

Edit: sorry for some of the typos, spell checker is hitting the crack pipe again
 
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