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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)

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Not too surprised to see that image. The Netherlands has a very large contract for the P99Q. The P99Q is the replacement for the phased out P5's that were in service for many years.
 

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Interesting, a 94.1 grain projectile.


Pretty much flys in the face of everything we currently know about self defense ammunition.
 
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And here I was, thinking I was the only one who noticed the P99Qs in the TV news coverage of the incident.


Good to know I'm not the only one.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Interesting, a 94.1 grain projectile.


Pretty much flys in the face of everything we currently know about self defense ammunition.
Maybe Dennis can clarify, but that looks to me very much like a BAT "Safety Action" bullet. It has a small tunnel all the way through the bullet. This allows the gas pressure to eject the plastic (in this case orange) nose cap and converts the RN profile into a HP nose. This was invented by Geco in the 1970s to guarantee feeding in semi-autos and full-autos. Geco's original version had a blue cap, but I'm betting the Netherland's ammo contract is big enough to make special-colored caps. :)

The most innovative and effective pistol bullet on the market now is the Lehigh Xtreme Defender. In 9mm it is a 90gr going around 1400fps, and it gives perfect penetration and consistent wound cavity regardless of barrier put in front of it. Military Arms Channel has a great video on it.
 

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Well I will admit that it is different. The effectiveness of it remains to be seen.

The high speed/light for caliber mantra has been chanted many times over the past 30 odd years, and yet they have never proven to be the answer.
 

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I found THIS interesting.....3/16" thick steel. The 9mm just bounced off (splattered). The Rock Island Armory 22 TCM's 40 grain bullet, traveling at 1,364 MPH blew right thru it like it was butter.

I think I feel the need for speed.

 

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I found THIS interesting.....3/16" thick steel. The 9mm just bounced off (splattered). The Rock Island Armory 22 TCM's 40 grain bullet, traveling at 1,364 MPH blew right thru it like it was butter.

I think I feel the need for speed.


And the sound?


I was at FGC range a few weeks ago while one was being fired in the next lane. Hands down the LOUDEST hand gun on the range (my 50AE stayed home), approaching the level of a 5.56 AR-15. Had NO idea what it was until I saw the necked cases on the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well I will admit that it is different. The effectiveness of it remains to be seen.

The high speed/light for caliber mantra has been chanted many times over the past 30 odd years, and yet they have never proven to be the answer.
Agreed and when I saw it, I was highly skeptical, especially considering it is also a non-expanding bullet. Just as I did with plastic-framed handguns in the 80s and early 90s, I ignored it for awhile, but the MAC test opened my eyes. It is a new concept which does not over-expand, and gives very consistent 19" of penetration, regardless of barrier. https://youtu.be/ClJcJ8LQFbQ
 

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@MMA10MM

This bullet is indeed closely related to the BAT ammo. I found a Dutch publication on the web with interesting info. I do reckon that your Dutch is potentially a bit rusty, but the pictures on the 3rd page tell the story.

http://www.ak56.nl/politie.pdf

The Dutch police used in the past the Action 3 and Action Effect ammo (the cartridges with the green tips). The Action NP does not have a small tunnel. The bullet expands as shown on the picture with the 3 expanded bullets.

In addition, the primer of the Action NP contains the rare earth metal Gd2O3. This stuff helps the forensic researchers to reconstruct shootings (eg determine shooting distances). There is a certain fear that the Gd2O3 (although present in very low amounts) posses a health risk, and therefore similar rounds without Gd2O3 are used for indoor practice. These rounds can be recognized by a grey tip instead of an orange one.

Regards,
Dennis
 

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@MMA10MM

This bullet is indeed closely related to the BAT ammo. I found a Dutch publication on the web with interesting info. I do reckon that your Dutch is potentially a bit rusty, but the pictures on the 3rd page tell the story.

http://www.ak56.nl/politie.pdf

The Dutch police used in the past the Action 3 and Action Effect ammo (the cartridges with the green tips). The Action NP does not have a small tunnel. The bullet expands as shown on the picture with the 3 expanded bullets.

In addition, the primer of the Action NP contains the rare earth metal Gd2O3. This stuff helps the forensic researchers to reconstruct shootings (eg determine shooting distances). There is a certain fear that the Gd2O3 (although present in very low amounts) poses a health risk, and therefore similar rounds without Gd2O3 are used for indoor practice. These rounds can be recognized by a grey tip instead of an orange one.

Regards,
Dennis
 

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Discussion Starter #15
@MMA10MM

This bullet is indeed closely related to the BAT ammo. I found a Dutch publication on the web with interesting info. I do reckon that your Dutch is potentially a bit rusty, but the pictures on the 3rd page tell the story.

http://www.ak56.nl/politie.pdf

The Dutch police used in the past the Action 3 and Action Effect ammo (the cartridges with the green tips). The Action NP does not have a small tunnel. The bullet expands as shown on the picture with the 3 expanded bullets.

In addition, the primer of the Action NP contains the rare earth metal Gd2O3. This stuff helps the forensic researchers to reconstruct shootings (eg determine shooting distances). There is a certain fear that the Gd2O3 (although present in very low amounts) posses a health risk, and therefore similar rounds without Gd2O3 are used for indoor practice. These rounds can be recognized by a grey tip instead of an orange one.

Regards,
Dennis
Outstanding!! Thank you Dennis. My Dutch doesn't exist, but my German is just good enough to get me by! :D
 
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