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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My local gun ranges do not rent out P99's. The only P99 I have shot was a full size 9mm AS in a friends back yard without a target so I don't know how well I was shooting it. The recoil seemed small though and I think I can handle the .40 with the full size. This will be my first gun purchase.

How much more spread does the .40 compact have than the 9mm compact under rapid fire?

I am considering a P99 AS Compact 9mm or .40 for CCW purposes but I am afraid that the .40 in such a small gun will be too much to control in a hostile situation.

The only other compact I have shot is the Glock 30 in .45 and the recoil was enough that it took a long time to reaquire.
 

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If you are indeed 'onebigcubano' you should have no trouble controlling a .40 provided you train often, frequently and all the time. Shoot heavy practice ammo (say 180 gr Winchester USA) to exercise the muscles that control your gun. Every now and then shoot a box of your carry ammo. Shoot in different stances (single handed, weaver, isoceles, left and right) too.

I have no experience in the matter (thankfully) but I'm sure that when adrenaline kicks in your training will be more than sufficient to keep a .40 on target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol the name is meant to be funny rather than any reference to my size.

Thanks for the tip and I'll have to look up those stances. This past weekend I rented a G26 which is the compact glock 9mm and I had no problem at all keeping a decent group under relatively rapid fire for what a range will allow. I also shot a HK USP compact in .40 and I could manage a slightly larger group than the G26. Controlling recoil, as I learned, is less about the gun and more about the shooter keeping that barrel where its supposed to be...at the target. Thanks.
 

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Haha, good one on the name


I think it's a mix of strength and fluidity that enables you to quickly get the sights back on target. If you put too much force into it you slow yourself down and I suspect your trigger pull will suffer as well. Too loose and the gun flies all over the place and might not even cycle properly. Start slowly and over time increase your speed as sight lineup becomes more and more automatic.

It's a bummer that ranges don't allow true rapid fire. At least the 3 that I go to have the same rule as yours. Not to mention that you can only shoot at fixed targets at your level from a standing (maybe sitting) position. Rather limiting.
 

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The .40 will probably have bigger group sizes than the 9mm will, unless you practice a lot with it. Neither will give you outstanding group sizes coming from a compact gun, especially at longer ranges.

The compact gun is designed to be used for up close and personal use. At that range, up to 7 or 10 yards, the group size is almost a mute point. If you think you'll be engaging bad guys at distances greater than 10 yards, then a full size gun would be better.

My personal preference for the compact would be a .40. You get more power and a bigger bullet to stop the fight faster with. And like I said, inside the 10 yard line, the accuracy of between the 9 and the .40 is almost nill. You could easily not hit with the 9mm as you could the .40, especially when under great stress.
 

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Thanks. I think the main point I'm trying to make is that compact models are meant to be back-up guns. They are not meant to be tack drivers.
 

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yes they are back up guns but in the new era the small guns or back up or ultralight guns or wathever they call them comes in Big calibers like .45 or .40 or 357 magnum
in the old days the backup guns always were .22 or 25. or 32 max 380

i know that freedom arms was the only one that have the pocket guns in 44 mag or 357 mag but that was a different type of guns

they was the 2 bullets guns
 

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A few months back I purchased a P99 AS in a .40 and it took me only a few practice sessions to get a tight “double-tap”. I have been shooting a S&W L frame using +P 38s so it has a relatively light recoil. With that wheel gun I can shoot out the X ring in rapid fire at 15 yards. I found my .40 has a lot heaver recoil, but I am now at the point I can do the same with that pistol. My son just purchased one in a 9mm and even though the recoil is lighter I have found that my target re-acquisition is no quicker. In my opinion, it comes down to practicing with the firearm and not the caliber, recoil or weight of the firearm.
To take this practice theme further, if you want to shoot accurately in a high stress situation, you practice on the range and in your mind. I know from experience that when the @$%& hits the fan, your inner mind relies on what it has been trained to do. If you have practiced using correct tactics and techniques, when the adrenalin kicks in due to a bad situation, you will recognize the threat, pull your weapon, automatically put your front sight on the target, and squeeze the trigger. Anyone in law enforcement or military will tell you that is how it works and why they practice.
My advise. Purchase the caliber you believe you will be comfortable with and practice constantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys. I am impressed in a way that the responses given were thought out and properly described. Internet forums can be so random since anybody can post anything they want.

I agree with P88...if a situation calls for real accuracy a handgun is not the needed tool anyway. I can't remember the exact number or where I picked up this information but most civilian self-defense scenarios where shots were fired is like 4 or less rounds at distances under 7 yards. Exactly right LongRange, you don't rise to the occasion but you default to your level of training.

As a conclusion to this thread, the answer for me is to get the .40 and get good. IDPA here I come...

Now what I have to do is find a 2005 P99c AS .40 with night sights. Not bad for a first gun, lol, but its going to be a crusade to find one. Thanks again to all.
 
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