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The P990 has a long travel trigger pull, functioning as a Double Action only pistol. It does have second strike capability and no decocker. The P99 QA has an action analogous to the Glock in that it starts with its striker partially cocked. The QA has a short travel trigger pull of about 7 pounds, a decocker that renders the trigger safe, and no second strike capability (unless recocked by a partial racking of the slide).

-The feature that people like best about the P990 and P99 QA is that the trigger pull does not change between the first shot and second like a DA/SA pistol such as the basic P99. That said, many carry / use the P99 in Single Action (cocked) and almost never use the DA.

 

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I personally have the DAO P-990 in 9mm. I also have a G-17 and a G-26. Lately, I have been thinking that I would trade both of the Glocks for a standard DA/SA 99, also in 9mm. The DAO is fine on a social gun, IMO, but for target practice the SA trigger seems like a better option to have. BTW, I personally have no problem with the first shot DA subsequent SA transition. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It has been discussed before...but I think carring the P99 Cocked with trigger forward is very unsafe...this is not a 1911 syle weapon and does not have any type of safety...I know the number one rule is fringer off the trigger...if you carry your 99 cocked trigger froward that is your choice and I have no problem with it ...but for me I have to carry my uncocked.
 

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-I don't want to revisit the discussion regarding carrying the gun in DA vs. SA. For me, it came down to the fact that I don't like the transitioning between DA and SA in any pistol. -Assuming a 10 round mag, people only train with the DA trigger pull one out of ten times on the range at best. I know people can decock the pistol for each shot, but I think the reality is that most do not. The consequence is that many people throw the first shot. I'm aware that statement may vary with the experience of the serious gun enthusiasts who are part of this forum; however, I'm talking about what I have seen most casual shooters and law enforcement personnel do on the range. I have also seen it in competition.

For competition and even more so for self defense, I'd rather have the pistol handle the same way each and every time. -That's why I went with the P99 QA. The trigger was gritty at first, but I stuck with it through the 500 round break-in period and the pistol became my favorite.

I have handled a P990 in 9mm. I liked it but I was looking at it more as a good semi-auto pistol to train someone with. The long travel trigger pull was close enough to a revolver that I felt it would make a good transition pistol from revolver to semi-auto. -That is not to imply I would not consider carrying it for self-defense. I think that it would be a fine self defense pistol. I simply find the P99 QA better suited to the role and my personal needs.

 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] ]I have handled a P990 in 9mm. I liked it but I was looking at it more as a good semi-auto pistol to train someone with. The long travel trigger pull was close enough to a revolver that I felt it would make a good transition pistol from revolver to semi-auto.
That is how I ended up with the 990. I was just moving into semi-autos from revolvers. My favorite semi-auto is the 1911, but at the time I didn't exactly trust the manual of arms. Have gotten much better with a 1911, and the 990 rarely comes out of the safe anymore.
Honestly, I feel that I am beginning to move away from wonder-nines.
 

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BreakerMorant,

Whats your take on the QA trigger directly compared to the SA trigger on the standard P99?  How would you compare the travel and pull weight?
 

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CKW,

The P99 QA has the shortest travel of the P99 models / variants.  Its travel is shorter than than even that of the P99 in SA.  The P99 has a noticeably lighter trigger in SA the P99 QA.  It's somewhere close to 2 lbs lighter.  Choosing between shorter travel and a lighter trigger is a personal preference.  -I'd like to lighten my trigger, but I enjoy the quicker break.  Many guys, I know, who have custom triggers in their 1911's are quick to complain about the long travel of a Glock's trigger yet mention nothing about the trigger's weight.  At their current specifications, it's a coin toss to say which is more important to cut down.

-The reality is you can acclimate to any version of the trigger.  I chose to acclimate to the quicker break of the QA because it offered a consistent trigger pull that was lighter and shorter than that of the P990.  If it was as light as the P99 in SA with the corresponding travel of the standard model in SA, I'd be just as happy.
 

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BreakerMorant,

With the QA, if one forgets to rack the slide (or doesn't remember that he racked the slide) how do you tell if it is pre-cocked? Nothing will happen when the trigger is pulled if it is not pre-cocked, I presume since it doesn't have second strike capability?

So there is still a cocked / uncocked indicator on the back of the slide that would alert you of the state of the trigger?

Explain if you could the way the QA trigger works, never shot a Glock so that comparison would be useless.

Thanks
 

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CKW,

You are correct the P99 QA does not have second strike capability. If you pull the trigger and the bullet does not go off, you either have to do the barest of a racking the slide to reset the striker (for a second attempt) or do a full rack and cycle the unfired round out. My vote is for fully racking the slide and dumping the round.

There is an indicator in the back. -I'm going from my memory of the standard P99 here, so my apologies to people with the standard P99 if I recall your indicator feature incorrectly. The P99 QA differs from the standard P99 in that the indicator does not extend beyond the hole as it would in the standard model. You cannot feel it in the dark to determine if the striker is cocked. You have to look down and see the red dot. When the gun is decocked, the indicator recesses into the slide so the red dot cannot be seen. If there is a doubt in either direction as to the state of the weapon you can do partial rack of the slide to reset the striker (if it's already set, no harm) or press the decocker to decock the weapon & render the trigger safe.

As far as the QA trigger goes, the striker starts from a partially cocked position (like a Glock- doesn't help, I know). (1) You rack the slide. This action partially cocks the striker. (2) By pulling the trigger, you fully cock the striker and release it in one motion. This state differs from SA because in SA a pull of the trigger releases a fully cocked, set striker. After the gun goes off, it resets with the striker partially cocked. It is never able to transition to SA or set at SA with a partial pull of the trigger. If you release tension from the trigger before it breaks, the striker returns to its partially cocked position. Since it's not true SA, Walther calls it Quick Action. Glock refers to it as Glock Safe Action.
 

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Hey thanks, thats a pretty good description. Just one more question.

Does racking or pre-cocking the slide actually physically set the trigger back 6mm?

The Walther brochure decription of the QA trigger travel is confusing. It says something about 6mm, then 3mm. 3mm would be in the range of the SA on my HK USP. 6mm + 3mm would equal or exceed the travel of my P99 in SA mode now. Just not sure what they are describing?
 

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I believe they are describing the striker itself, not the trigger. (I'm not completely sure because I haven't seen Walther's description)

I like my QA's a lot better than my regular P99's. They are a lot more accurate. My personal opion as to why they are more accurate is because the trigger doesn't travel all the way back to the frame, thus you won't get as much wrist movement pulling the trigger as you do with the SA on the regular P99.
 

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It is my understanding that the travel for the QA trigger is roughly .24" and the travel for the P99 in SA is roughly .32". (Please don't ask me to do the metric conversion.) Decocked/uncocked the trigger of the QA does nothing. It is in the same position it is when the striker is partially cocked.

-I saw your other question regarding the indicator for the striker, in the QA. It is definitely not tactile. It does move a bit as you pull the trigger. It does break the plane and emerge from the slide right before it breaks. However, it is minimal and more of a consequence of the trigger pull moving the striker than a designed feature to let you know that the pistol is indeed cocked.
 

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For what its worth, I did ask the Walther engineers to extend to striker indicator, so that it could be felt when it was cocked, similar to the regular P99. They never did respond to me on that.
 
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