Walther Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i want to now wich will you take for ccw in 9 mm i think of the p99 or the sig sauer p228 wich wan help please
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
P99 has higher capacity 16+1 vs. 13+1.
P99 is lighter in weight.
P99 is slimmer.
P99 has a lower bore axis.
P99 has just as good of a DA trigger.
P99 has a better SA.
P99 has a much shorter trigger reset.
P99 is just as reliable.
P99 is just as accurate.
P99 has a much more durable finish.
Hmmm........ I wonder which is better for CCW?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
This is a tough one to answer. They are two of my absolute favorite concealed carry and fighting pistols.

I do disaggree with NM_P99 on a couple of comparisons.

Using a post-ban 10 round magazine follower in a pre-ban full-cap p228 mag usually results in a gain of 1 to 2 rounds over the standard 13-round P228 mags or 15 round P226 mags that are readily available and usable in the P228. But still the P99 takes the cake here.

By technical box dimension the two pistols are nearly identical and the P99 measures slimmer but that's only because of the minor flare in the left grip panel of the P228 to accomodate the decocking lever, otherwise the P228's slide is measurably thinner than the P99's. I find the flare not to affect concealibility at all considering that all of my holsters carry this portion of the weapon above the belt line and thus is indistinguishable. One other note is that the overall length of the pistols are nearly identical but where the P228's hammer and grip tang account for the rear-most length measurement the full-dimensioned slide extends far back on the P99 to account for the grip tang. I find the extra slide length more fussy to conceal under a shirt, having a tendency to print or poke out more easily when carried in nearly identical holsters, on my frame (5'11", 195).

Although the P99 does have a lower bore axis it is not by much when you shoot high-handed as I do and is more than off set by the lighter frame and longer slide which changes the center of gravity on the pistol sharply upon recoil. I think the bore axis issue is over stated by many on not fully understood by all (no accusations here). Every person that has ever fired my P228 and my P99 has remarked that the P228 is far easier to control its recoil than the P99. The P99 simply exhibits far greater muzzle flip, the P228 is much more tame. I think that the few extra ounces in the P228s frame and its measurably lighter slide account for its relatively tame muzzle flip. Again, this is subjective, but no one that's fired both of my pistols has not remarked that the P99 has greater muzzle flip. I also suspect that David Olhasso wouldn't have achieved Grand Master with his P226 if the pistol exhibited particularly uncontrollable muzzle flip.

On the triggers, another subjective one. Both my two P99s and my two recent-manufactured P228s have equally outstanding triggers. It would be hard for me to prefer one over the other. No complaints here. All needed to smoothen up taken straight from the box to be as good as they are now. Lots of dry firing. I do prefer striker-fired pistols for lock-time reasons. I think the P99 does it better than any other pistols out there.

The P99 clearly has better trigger reset. In rapid fire drills I can shoot it fast but not any faster than my P228 while still remaining accurate and controlled. This is a training issue but one that favors the P228 as of late because it handles recoil far better and returns to target as fast as I'm able to reset the trigger anyways. I cannot get the P99 reliably back on target as fast as I can reset the trigger. Admittedly, I'm not the best at this skill.

Both of these weapons are super reliable and accurate. I've never experienced malfunctions with my P228 but have encountered the occasional cartridge that will not chamber in either of my P99s because of an overly long ogive on the bullet combined with the short throat of the Walther. Most notorious was the first-generation Speer Gold-Dot no longer in production. Like other polymer-framed pistols, the P99 will not reliably eject spent casings when fired with a limp-wrist. Although far better than my G17. I do have to barely be holding on to the pistol in order to induce these malfunctions (read: nearly flying out of my hand on recoil). It's nearly impossible to choke up either of my P228s doing this drill. For these reasons I favor my SIG by a small margin in its reliability.

Accuracy is very comparable. My instincts and experience favor the SIG here but the reality of the accuracy difference is so small to not really deserve mention. My guess is that the P99 will not suffer as pronounced accuracy loss when the round count reaches the tens of thousands. The P99 is simply more durable. Although, it's arguable whether you'll ever capitalize on this feature because if you maintain each weapon as they should they both should last for a very, very long time. Unmaintained the P99 is clearly more corrosion-resistant, too.

All in all, because of my personal shooting style, I ever-so-slightly favor my P228. It is proven and a benchmark standard for other pistols to be judged. The P99 is as close to dethroning my P228 as any other pistol has been able to come, and may someday do.

regards,
Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
[b said:
Quote[/b] ]Every person that has ever fired my P228 and my P99 has remarked that the P228 is far easier to control its recoil than the P99. The P99 simply exhibits far greater muzzle flip, the P228 is much more tame
Thats interesting, because my experience has been the opposite, before I sold my P228 and P225, everyone commented on how much more muzzle flip the Sigs had compared to the P99.
As far as capacity, sure the P226 mags work in a P228, but they stick out the bottom of the grip by 1/2" and that definately detracts from concealability.
For me the extra weight of the Sig was the biggest hurdle to comfortable CCW. And the finish was comparable to flat black Krylon, but not as durable.
I really liked my P228 and P225, but when all the pros and cons were added up, the P99 just made for a better CCW pistol IMO.
I'd feel adequately armed with just about any service grade pistol, it all really comes down to personal preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
NM_P99,

Obviously different shooters have different results or perceptions. Strangely, my P228 exhibits far less muzzle flip than my P99. What's funny is that I bought my first P99 for my wife who did not like the way my sig pro recoiled. She was very happy with the P99 after we got it. And, strangely, months later when she was shooting all three side-by-side she finally admitted that the sig pro recoiled no worse, if not better, than the P99, and that the P228 was far better than both. Every shooter who I've handed my P228 and P99 to has made the same observation. I think that some folks just assume the SIG has more muzzle flip because of the higher bore axis. I think how you are holding the gun has a lot to do with it. I shoot as high-handed as possible from a garden-variety Isosceles stance. My Glock 17 probably has the least muzzle flip but its not that much better than my P228. What is noticeable to me is that the G17 torques my hand a lot more and tends to bounce around a little more recklessly in my hand when trying to return to target. My P228 is just so darn smooth. My P226 and P239 are no exception either.

Although I certainly don't categorize the P228 as a heavy handgun. It definitely doesn't drag my pants down at 26 ozs. The P99 is very light weight (22 oz.), however, and that's always appreciated in a carry gun.

My comment about the magazines wasn't intended to suggest that the P228 outdoes the P99. Clearly the P99 has the advantage. I only meant to remark that the P228 gives you options and both are high-cap 9s with more than enough rounds to do the job.

The P99 is an outstanding weapon. My only complaints, (other than what I've already mentioned), are that I occasionally experience failures to lock the slide back upon empty because my thumb strikes the slide lock. I've never done this on my P228 (P226 and P239 are a different story). Also, it tends to shoot very high above the sights when compared to my other weapons. Particularly the SIGs which are POA-POI. Can't do much about it with my Trijicons on.

I don't think the P99 is any less of a weapon than my P228 and would feel equally well-armed with either.

Tim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
411 Posts
[b said:
Quote[/b] (sigmundsauer @ July 29 2003,11:03)]I occasionally experience failures to lock the slide back upon empty because my thumb strikes the slide lock.  I've never done this on my P228 (P226 and P239 are a different story).
See my thread a while back about the slide stop, I trimmed the slide stop lever and have had no more problems since then.
My P228 was notorious for early slide stop engagement. I constantly was accidently pushing the lever up, while I still had rounds in the magazine.
Sheesh...... were we both shooting P228's, our experiences are almost exact opposites.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Yeah, go figure?

I don't have a problem with slide-lock on my P228's mainly because the grip is engineered a little differently than the P226's or the P239's. The flare adjacent to my right thumb does a pretty good job of keeping my thumb away from the slide lock.

My P99 is another story. And if you recall, when you posted about the slide lock mod to your P99 I had responded to your post because I had already cut my slide lock to minimize inadvertent slide-lock-failure on empty (I tend to ride my thumb on top of it). Both of my P99's have the mod and the slide locks are pretty minimalist now. Don't have so much a problem now, but it's not totally cured.

Tim
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top