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Discussion Starter #1
So how/where are they different?

I know the P99QA is a shorter/lighter 8 lb DAO, feels kinda like a Glock w a NY trigger (but better IMO).

Are the frame internals the same and the slides are all that is different? Or are the frames different too?

Oh, hicap mags... I've seen some w Walther P99 floor plates, MecGar and Walther markings, witness holes for 8 and 12 on one side, 5, 10, 15 on the other. Are these 15 or 16 round mags? Springs have an odd loop/turn about 1/3 of the way down too.
 

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The P99QA is Single Action Only, and I describe like this - imagine a Glock, like a 17 or 19.  Now change the angle to that it actually feels comfortable.  Now balance it, too.  Make it a little more accurate, and a lot more reliable.  Add a de-cocking button.  Take away all the stories you've heard about KB's and finally, add a "cool" factor of 9.97.


As far as I know, the internals are all the same between the P99 and QA, except of course for the trigger mechanism.  The frames themselves are definately the same.  Lunde would be the best person to ask about that.  It may also be in his FAQ HERE

As far as the mags, my understanding is that they do actually hold 16 rounds, but are only marked as 15 because of regulations of where they were manufactured or intended for use.  (I think they were for Belgarian police, and their national law forbids magazines that hold more than 15 rounds.  I could be wrong about the country....)

If you find a good source for hicaps, share.  I'm looking.  Best price I can get right now is like $96 shipped...
 

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The slide and striker assembly are different.
The trigger group is slightly different.
The frames are identical.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks! Got a chance to look at/try both, and I prefer the P99 to the P99QA.

BTW, you can not take away _all_ the stories you've heard about kBs. I know of several in P99s (all .40s naturally, and all with factory ammo too). Damage was less severe than many of the the Glocks I've seen; just cracked frames, no ruptured chambers, split barrels/slides so far.

Why I still prefer 9x19 to .40. ;)

Bare gel:

124/9 +P GD 12/.68 caliber
147/9 GD 12.6/.66

155/40 GD 13/.68
165/40 GD 13/.65
180/40 GD 12/.68

Through 4 layers of denim:

124/9 +P GD 14/.59

155/40 GD 16/.60

Of course, different lots of ammo, different testers, some variation, but all close enough for me that I will stick to the cheaper ammo less likely to break my gun. YMMV.
 

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Kowboy is correct. The striker is not fully cocked. When you pull the trigger, you can see the striker move rearward until it releases.
 

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In a QA the striker starts partially cocked. It is not a DAO pistol. The DAO version of the P99 pistol was the P990 (apparently discontinued). There was at least a prototype of a follow-up DAO, but it was not and is not the QA.

 

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I think the P99 and Glock .40s kB for different reasons.

Glocks are notorious for their unsupported chambers which anybody that suggests that there isn't a link should be suspicious themselves.

The P99s that I've run into have very short throats compared to other barrels. The potential for a round to not be fully chambered and still fired exists and places the rearmost portion of the case outside of the chamber by a fraction of an inch while inducing higher chamber pressures - not a good combination. P99s are strong, but if the cartridge doesn't get fully chambered there's not much to expect other than a kB.

Just my observation.

Tim
 

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I forgot to add, there is no second strike capability in a QA short of a slight rack of a slide (which I wouldn't waste time doing). In a DAO, you can pull the trigger over and over again and go through the entire action. In a QA, with a snap cap or a dud, the action does not reset to a point where you can go through the entire action. The only thing that resets the action is the racking of the slide, either by hand or when firing live ammunition.

 

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Discussion Starter #10
The P99QA is a DAO by some folk's definitions and standards, even if it isn't as long and heavy a DAO as the P990, and even if it does not have a repeat strike capability.

When the trigger is pulled a double action happens: the partially cocked striker is 1) fully cocked (even a teensy little bit counts) and then is 2) released.

The QA is as much a DAO as a Glock, and the Glock is a DAO pistol by the official definitions of the folks who count the most: FBI, DEA, BATF, Customs, Department of State, etc.

Just like the Springfield Armory XD is a SA (single action) pistol, no matter how much it feels like a Glock. When ya pull the triger, the single action of releasing the fully cocked striker tkes place. ;)

But feel free to disagree, many do. But they don't count as much as the folks mentioned above. ;)
 

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The website has a few inaccuracies (green frame QA? maybe it'll show up some day) and I was not familiar with the latest change. If your feathers feel ruffled- Apologies.

Back when I was looking at the QA, it was listed as quick action without the parentheses. Every gun dealer spoke of it in terms of being a bridge between DA and SA but not quite being either. At the shooting matches I've attended, it is treated like a SA pistol. I have never seen the rangemaster insist on the shooter decocking the gun before hitting the buzzer. I have seen DA/SA pistol users have to decock. As far as I know, it's not an issue for DAO since there is no decocker there is no way of decocking the P990 (a DAO pistol). This makes me inclined to view the QA as something other than a true DA.

As far as the other stuff goes, the agencies have definitions for a lot of things that do not synch up with reality. An easy example would be assualt weapons. Tabling the side issue of whether anyone should own one, the reality is that in military terms for a gun to be an assault weapon, it has to be capable of full automatic or burst fire. The civilian guns affected by the law were not (w/o modification). The term which has a military origin dating back to WWII was misused. It is now in the public lexicon and the laws. Are the guns really assault weapons? I guess that depends on if one gets arrested.

Is the QA really a true DA pistol? It must be, Walther called it Quick Action. Curiously, Glock called the action of their pistol Glock Safe Action instead of DA.

I'm sure it's all just meaningless and mindless.

 

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Discussion Starter #13
Matches up w reality just fine. The argument for it being DAO is stronger than for it being anything else of the three most official choices there are:

1. SA
2. DA or TDA (DA/SA)
3. DAO

Unless ya wanna put every variation of striker fired guns in another category all it's own?

To repeat...

When ya pull the trigger on the QA, a double action happens.

1. The partially cocked striker is fully cocked and

2. Released.

Since that is the only way it can be fired, it is a "true" DAO.

Or not. I'm flexible. ;)

The National Institute of Justice uses the term Striker Fired Action (SFA) to lump em all together (no matter what the maker, gun shop, or gamers call em) if that works better for ya.
 

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Walther in Germany maintains the distinction between the QA (Quick Action) and DAO (P990). Walther America is probably using the BATF classification. Given the choices, I agree with Broken Arrow.

Broken Arrow, how does the NIJ classify a P7?
 
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