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Discussion Starter #1
I considering getting the internal parts of my P99 hard chromed. Does anyone here have information on how to frame strip a Walther P99? Thanks, BSW
 

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BSW, a word of warning before you get your P99's internal parts Hard Chromed! There have been articles written about "hydrogen embrittlement" being a POSSIBLE side effect of Hard Chroming. I had a PPK Hard Chromed recently by one of the most highly recommended and often referred to Hard Chromer's in the industry. Upon shooting the newly Hard Chromed PPK, the firing pin broke. I sent it back to the vender and he replaced the firing pin. At the next use of the PPK, the "chamber loaded indicator pin" broke. At that point, the cost of shipping the gun to and from the vendor again, would have been more than having my local gunsmith fix it - which he did. Now, I can't say for sure that Hard Chroming caused those parts to become brittle and break, but it sure is suspicious that they broke so soon after Hard Chroming!!!! My local gunsmith said that he's seen fragile parts fail after Hard Chroming in other guns! Hard Chroming IS NOT an exact science and there are risks involved. I personally WOULD NOT have any of my guns internal parts Hard Chromed because of my experience with my PPK and the gunsmith's comments that he's seen it in other Hard Chromed guns!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Understood, and thanks for the warning. The guys I'm looking at, techplate.com, bake parts after chroming to drive the hydrogen out of the steel. Hydrogen enbrittlement is a well know problem with hard chroming, as is the solution.

It also appears that harder steel requires a longer bake. techplate.com has a very good FAQ. BSW
 

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I would get a dremel and some polish compound and do it yourself if anything. personally. Mine will stay the way it come in the box. Never had a FTF or FTD.
 

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Get the intenals covbered in NP3 if ya wanna do it - Supposedly, it smooths out the action and makes the trigger very nice.

I wouldn't personally do the outside of a slide in NP3 because I hear it is so slick that it is hard to get a grip on it.

But yea - hard chroming anything other than make an external hammer is probably not a good idea...

Just stick to hard chroming your slide
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If I was going to do anything I would do the barrel, inside and out. I live in Oregon, and corrosion can be a problem up here, especially on a carry gun.

Since the chromer has a minimum order $, I was thinking of getting some of the internal parts done also, like the slide release and trigger bar/ sear release group.

Just don't find chromed slides pleasing myself. Eye of beholder and all that... BSW
 

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I do not believe they chrome the INSIDE of a barrel when you send it to be hard chromed - it will more than likely be just the outside. I've seen this come up - and the answer I've seen is that when hard chromed, they leave the inside untouched... All I can say...
 

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Any "plating" done to the lands and grooves of a barrel.......you can look for the accuracy of the weapon to be effected. Just how bad depends on the extent of the plating procedure. This has been a problem with chroming military barrels for years..........no process, so far, can promise the plating will be exactly "EVEN" through-out the entire bore. The Military doesn't see the loss of accuracy as a severe problem, because they have opted for the more rust resistent barrel.

It is common knowledge that a chrome lined barrel is not as accurate as a chrome molly barrel or Stainless Steel version.

It's a personal choice, of course.............. but some simple weekly cleaning care will prevent ANY chance of a bore rusting. An no loss of accuracy will occur with a simple wipe of TW25B lubricant - protectant.........and will actually help prevent the chemical bonding of "copper" to the bore itself.

Just some info..so you can make an informed choice.

JF.
 
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