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I am trying to decide if I should get a 9mm or 40 sw. I want it for both personal defense and for pleasure shooting. And with the expire of the assault weapons ban; magazines are a consideration. What should I get. All things considering. Cost of ammo, stopping power, clip capacity, and what not. Let me know what people think. I like 9mm cause ammo is cheap and good clip capacity, 40 is good cause of stopping power, teh .357 sig barrel, and my wife is going to the police academy and will have to carry at least a 40 sw. But it is more expensive ammo wise. how much, I don't know. So what is everyones opinions of what to get. Thanks for the info. Just wanted some more experience and feedback from the group.
Patrick
 

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First you should shoot .40 S&W and 9mm, so you can see the difference in recoil.  Rent a Glock 17/19/26 and Glock 22/23/27 to compare the two calibers.  I'm not saying it will happen to you, but some people don't like the .40 S&W's recoil characteristics.  You can easily adapt to it if you put in the time on the range, but it is different from 9mm.

-The 9mm version has greater capacity 16 vs. 12 with hi-cap mags.
-9mm is cheaper by about a couple of bucks a box of 50.

I don't have the ballistics data in front of me but the .40 S&W has better wounding capacity and stopping power than the 9mm.  You can get into high powered loads for the 9mm that will bring it closer to the .40 S&W, but comparing like to like the .40 S&W has an edge here.  That is why LE agencies have been switching to it from 9mm during the past few years.  I believe that cost of the .40 S&W will drop as it becomes more common over time.  However, the continual introduction of new rounds, ie: .357 Sig and .45 GAP, could put a bump in that future.  Also, if your wife's department uses .40, you might be the beneficiary of their bulk ammo purchases bringing your ammo costs way down.  Agencies vary on this.  -I had a FBI friend who had four or five coffee cans full of hydrashok ammo.  That was his practice ammo.  -Not bad.

I don't look at the .357 barrel conversion as a major plus but that's because I don't like caliber conversions in guns.  I find it generally produces uneven wear over time as you continue to swap back and forth.  -YMMV.

What you should get is a matter of personal preference.  One of my friends picked up a 9mm P99 while another had picked up a .40 S&W P99.  They had both tried mine which is in .40 S&W.  They're roughly equivalent as shooters in terms of ability, but they have their individual preferences.  -That is why you should find a gun like the Glock where the frames of the 9mm and .40 S&W versions of the pistol are identical and the only thing you are testing is the caliber.

Good luck-

 

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I am not an expert yet but i have many a years to go till i am but i belive that if ur gonna shoot it ALOT than u should definentatly try both calibers. I have not shot a 9mm P99 but i have shot a Smith sigma series in 9mm and found the recoil very managable with very little flip. I have noted that the glocks have different flip and recoil characteristics than the P99. Try em all out see wut u think! and tell us wut u think. my 2 cents for ya
 

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I bought the P99 in 9mm because my German friends raved about them, I had sold my Glock 17 and wanted another Nine, GunTests magazine loved the Nine more than the Forty, and I have a weakness for anything with the Walther banner on it.

Very easy to shoot, very inexpensive, highly accurate, never a malfunction, and effective for defense when loaded with a high quality personal defense loading. I like the Winchester 9mm Ranger 127grain +P+ loading.

I like this pistol and ammo so much, that my Glock 36 is for sale [Forgive me John Wayne!], so I can get a commemorative P99.
 

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It's a secondary consideration, but the slides are shaped differently between the two calibers. (At least they used to be) The 9mm version has a scalloped area towards the muzzle, the .40 does not.

I personally liked the looks of the P99 in 9mm over the .40. I bought the .40 anyway due to the potency considerations. I may have chosen differently now with the standard capacity magazines available.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (MLB @ Sep. 09 2004,8:14)]It's a secondary consideration, but the slides are shaped differently between the two calibers. (At least they used to be) The 9mm version has a scalloped area towards the muzzle, the .40 does not.

I personally liked the looks of the P99 in 9mm over the .40. I bought the .40 anyway due to the potency considerations. I may have chosen differently now with the standard capacity magazines available.
Same here dude... stupid ban freaked me out and I went .40. I still love the .40 though... shoots like a dream. Less recoil than my Kahr 9mm.
 

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I had both and ended trading the 40 for a Beretta (long story). Anyway, with the 9, I could shoot the Walther all day and enjoy myself. The 40 started beating me up after about the first hour at the range each time.
 

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Not to stir a hornet's nest, but let me throw in my take on the 9mm vs 40cal debate.

If you read everything there is to read, you might come to the same conclusion that I did.  That in almost every case where a shooting failed to stop a perpetrator, the shot placement was lousy, and a larger caliber would not have made a difference.  In almost every case where a perp was stopped, the shot placement was good, and a smaller round wouldn't have made a difference.  Loosely translated: shot placement, shot placement, shot placement.

Are there rare exceptions to the rule, where clothing or other factors changed the outcome?  Sure.  But the key word here is rare exceptions.  Remember that the difference in diameter between 9mm and 40cal is about .02" - hardly anything to sway the circumstances either way, IMO.

Second, the two most commonly stated "Urban Legends" of 9mm are:
A) They're not powerful enough to penetrate
B) They're too high a velocity, so they overpenetrate
Uh... I dunnow about you guys, but these two concepts are mutually exclusive.

So, at the end of the day, I load 147gr Ranger SXT (yes, the "Black Talon) and I don't look back. There is MUCH more variety in the 9mm range than in 40, and because the rounds are much cheaper where I am, one can afford to practice more and become proficient at the defining characteristic that wins fights - shot placement.
 

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[b said:
Quote[/b] (Administrator @ Sep. 21 2004,12:53)] Remember that the difference in diameter between 9mm and 40cal is about .02" - hardly anything to sway the circumstances either way, IMO.
While I agree that shot placement is absolutely vital and usually the decisive factor, another important difference between the 9mm and .40 S&W rounds is the difference in mass.  While the 9mm is between 115 and 124 grains of lead, the .40 S&W is much heavier being between 165 and 180 grains.  Add to that, the differences in their velocities isn't that great. -While the 9mm is faster, you have a much heftier bullet in the .40 S&W traveling almost as fast.

-I think the difference in diameter would be more useful in considering how well the force is transferred from the bullet to the body...
 
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