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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There's a seller on GB (Exclusive Firearms) who's had a few fairly worn P5s on auction over the past few months. Apparently they're selling the last few off at a static price--which seems pretty decent.

I'm fine with some finish wear. My hangup is the feed ramp...

Previous pictures showed "tracks" worn into the alloy finish of the ramps (of the auction guns). Is that something that will affect feeding reliability? Or is it just nominal wear, given the design the of the gun?
 

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...

.... Is that something that will affect feeding reliability? Or is it just nominal wear, given the design the of the gun?
It might, depending on its severity and on the bullet profile of the ammunition used. I'm not sure what you mean by "nominal" wear. It is seen, in varying degrees, on many well-used P5s.

My own theory is that it is caused by poor, incomplete presentation of the top cartridge in the magazine. In correct presentation, the top cartridge is pivoted up against the magazine feed lips at the proper angle to be fed. If it does not, it is stripped out at a shallow angle or even nose-down, forcing the ramp to "bump" the bullet nose up to feed. The root cause, IMO, is a dirty magazine or ill-fitting ammunition, or both.

Once the hard anodized "skin" is broken through by the battering of bullet noses against the ramp, the relatively soft aluminum underneath gets chewed up pretty rapidly. It's not really fixable by polishing.

M
 

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Once the hard anodized "skin" is broken through by the battering of bullet noses against the ramp, the relatively soft aluminum underneath gets chewed up pretty rapidly. It's not really fixable by polishing.

M

I used to do copper and nickel electroplating at a machine shop. It should be possible to polish the feed ramp to the desired profile and then plate just that small area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Once the hard anodized "skin" is broken through by the battering of bullet noses against the ramp, the relatively soft aluminum underneath gets chewed up pretty rapidly. It's not really fixable by polishing.

M
This is what I mean:

036853_Img5076706.jpg

This seller has had a few P5s with feed ramps in this condition. I've shied away for the reasons stated above. If the gun is designed to function with a feedramp like this... I'm game (i.e., if feed ramp anodizing isn't an operative factor in function). Otherwise, I'll pass.

Seems like quite a few rounds "bumped" off the ramp, with this particular example. Though I'd guess that's how it's designed to feed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I used to do copper and nickel electroplating at a machine shop. It should be possible to polish the feed ramp to the desired profile and then plate just that small area.
Hmm. Interesting to know this kind of thing can be done. But, if the ramp finish is an issue... I'd probably opt to pay more up front for one in better condition.
 

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I considered purchasing one of these with excessive feed ramp wear, was going to resurface the feed ramp, then send to RoBar for NP3 coating. Problem solved and great finish for a shooter.


Came to the conclusion the "rough" P5 needed to be $400 or less for this time/effort/expense to be cost effective. I had no interest in this time/effort resulting in a gun approaching and possibly exceeding $1000.


Bought an almost new Commercial market Var8 shooter for $1000 and added wood grips. I'm glad I went that route.


It all comes down to what you want, I like pretty P5s......
 

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I have a P5 with the same type of wear on the feed ramp. Only ran about 50 rounds but no issues so far. The pistol is in good shape with minor outer surface wear. I'll provide an update after a couple more range trips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I considered purchasing one of these with excessive feed ramp wear, was going to resurface the feed ramp, then send to RoBar for NP3 coating. Problem solved and great finish for a shooter.


Came to the conclusion the "rough" P5 needed to be $400 or less for this time/effort/expense to be cost effective. I had no interest in this time/effort resulting in a gun approaching and possibly exceeding $1000.


Bought an almost new Commercial market Var8 shooter for $1000 and added wood grips. I'm glad I went that route.


It all comes down to what you want, I like pretty P5s......
Man, you've got quite a collection. Props on the Nills--I've got them on my PPK/S and my P239.

But yeah, that was more or less my line of thinking... more up-front investment just makes more sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have a P5 with the same type of wear on the feed ramp. Only ran about 50 rounds but no issues so far. The pistol is in good shape with minor outer surface wear. I'll provide an update after a couple more range trips.
Interesting. Thanks for the info. I'd be curious to know how yours performs, going forward.

I mean, if you're gonna design a gun with an alloy feed ramp... you know some ramp wear is inevitable. Perhaps it's purely cosmetic and the rounds will glide over that bare aluminum with no problem whatsoever.

Or... not.
 

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I took another look at the feed ramp again last night and it looks worst than it is, basically the paint / coating is worn but the ramp remains smooth, which is why it still seems to work perfectly. Will post a photo and update after a few 100 more rounds.
 

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I have fired 1000's or rounds through my P5 over the years. The feed ramp is a bit worn, but it has never failed me.



Unless it is REALLY bad, I wouldn't worry too much about it.
 

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If the magazine is correctly presenting the top cartridge, and you are using smooth-profile FMJ ammunition that does not have an excessive OAL (that causes the nose of the bottom cartridge to stick and stumble against the front wall of the magazine), the only part of the feed ramp that comes in contact with a bullet is at the very top edge. Some wear is inevitable at this point. If you're seeing "tracks" on the feed ramp at a point midway down or lower, there's a magazine or ammunition problem.

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If the magazine is correctly presenting the top cartridge, and you are using smooth-profile FMJ ammunition that does not have an excessive OAL (that causes the nose of the bottom cartridge to stick and stumble against the front wall of the magazine), the only part of the feed ramp that comes in contact with a bullet is at the very top edge. Some wear is inevitable at this point. If you're seeing "tracks" on the feed ramp at a point midway down or lower, there's a magazine or ammunition problem.

M
Hmm. Would you say that's the issue with the feed ramp pictured here?

 

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My P5 has the same pattern of wear on the feed ramp. I have fired several hundred rounds through it so far with no problems at all. I bought mine from the same seller.
 
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