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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think most manufacturers calculate a cycle life for their guns. I read somewhere recently - and I don't know that its true - that the expected cycle life of a P38 was 10,000 rounds. Anybody know what to expect for a Walther P5? Given the alloy frame it may not be really high, but I would hope for something above 10K.

Out West
 

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If you keep the springs updated, and don't shoot "proof" type loads I can't think of any reason a P5 or P1 would "wear out".
 

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I agree, I have never heard of a cycle life for a P5 or a P38. What is your source, I would be interested to know? The only P38's that had a problem were the 'pre hex pin alloy frames. But as far as the slide and barrel, being a straight recoiling design I would beleive the cycle life would be many times 10,000 rounds.
 

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I took my P5 to the range today and my son and I put an easy 100 rounds through it. Once again, it performed flawlessly; the doggone thing is as accurate as my hand and a real pleasure to shoot. At this rate, I figure that my son will wear out sometime around 2095 -- if only he lives so long. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Source was either this forum or the P38 forum. But the reference I read may have been for the P1. Not really sure. Was really looking for a factory spec on the P5. I agree about the recoil springs - its an inexpensive precaution to take. Recently I have been using a dry moly lubricant on frame rails. It doesn't foul with shooting and it seems to be protecting very well. Hopefully, the moly will add some life to the alloy frame rails.

Out West
 

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I would imagine that the manufacturers are very protective of that information. I was involved in a post about someone saying my Kahr PM9 was only good for 25,000, and a factory rep denied that rumor. I really would be surprised if anyone could find the informaiton you seek on the longevity of the P5.
 

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I have a stupid question here. Please bear with me, if I were worried about how many rounds were left to be discharged prior to reaching the estimated service life of my P5. Then wouldn't I need to how many rounds were fired from it. I mean I purchased my P5 surplus used. I don't have a clue how many rounds at what power level were fired prior to it coming to my house. So what good would a total number of rounds that could be fired before the weapon's frame failed be to me?

Now if you're just the curious type I respect that. The short answer would be that government agencies do come up with estimated service lives of firearms for accounting purposes. They have to know how much an asset depreciates in a year for example. But I don't know any firearms manufacturers that would publish such numbers. Look at it from the product liability stand point, it wouldn't benefit Walther or Colt for example to make any such numbers public.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Curious. Not worried. Yes, there are expected cycle lives for every hand gun made - as well as every other manufactured applicance made; from dish washers to space shuttles.

OW
 

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As far as I know, these 10'000 rounds limit has been the minimum
requirement from the german government to fulfil the allowance
for a military/police gun.
That doesn't mean that the gun is blasting apart with round
10'001 ;-)

Regards,
inspiron
 

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As far as I know, the 10'000 rounds limit has been the minimum
requirement from the german government to fulfil the allowance
for a military/police gun.
That doesn't mean that the gun is blasting apart with round
10'001 ;-)

Regards,
inspiron
 

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All firearms have a finite service life, even though it may not be expressed as such. They DO wear out, or break -- eventually beyond economic repair.

A lot depends on how terms are defined. Does it mean functional cycles without a failure that renders the gun unserviceable until repaired, or without a failure of a major part (and if so, which parts are considered "major"?). This will vary from one organization to another; some organizations consider the frame an expendable part that can be replaced without losing the gun's identity. For accounting, procurement and supply purposes, it is also sometimes considered that the guns themselves do not have a specified service life but their components do.

While guns intended for police or military use are usually engineered to render the desired level of durability specified by the users, guns that are primarily designed for civilian consumers are often less robust, and the extent of endurance testing is influenced more by cost and marketing considerations.

M
 
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