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Discussion Starter #1
Will the P38 ever be brought back? I heard the P5 might be in production soon, which is nice how it uses the same system etc, but I want a P38. Maybe its in 9mm instead, but the looks of the P38 are awesome.
 

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For the money, seek out a later P1 import; the latest will have a beefed up slide, and hex pin in the frame. Not sure of current pricing, but an excellent-new condition pistol will probably be WAY less than any new production gun, and serve you for many years. Also, being less expensive or rare than WWII versions, you could feel free to modify the P1 and not feel as much remorse over lost "value" later on.
 

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A P5 with a double stack mag (HK P7M13 style, to clear the recoil springs, top 3/4" is a single stack width) would be sweet.
 
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Walther did in fact consider that before embarking on the P88, and soon dismissed the idea as impractical. I think they were right.

Where is the P7M13 today? Nowhere.

M
 

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Walther did in fact consider that before embarking on the P88, and soon dismissed the idea as impractical. I think they were right.

Where is the P7M13 today? Nowhere.

M
Same place as the P38, P5/P5C, and P88, only commanding bigger money. :) Not saying they are that great, just pricy due to such scarcity.
 

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The P38 and P5 have about as much chance of coming back as Grover Cleveland.

M
Grover Cleveland has a better chance.
 
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Given its capacity to size&weight ratio, plus how intricate the design is, and comparing it to newer designs, there's simply no point to the P.38 anymore, other than as historical artifact.
It would be expensive a.f., and how many would be sold?
 

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Walther did in fact consider that before embarking on the P88, and soon dismissed the idea as impractical. I think they were right.

Where is the P7M13 today? Nowhere.

M

???
I was only referring to the mag design of the P7M13, not bringing the entire HK P7M13 gun into this topic.


Read again..."double stack mag (HK P7M13 style, to clear the recoil springs, top 3/4" is a single stack width)".


In NO way was I calling for a P7 similar firearm to enter production in the future.


As for the "dismissed as impractical"? I agree, the shift to less expensive firearms is, and always will be the norm. There were more simple designs that would reduce production costs, keep MSRPs competitive, and maximize profits.


As the P5 is gaining popularity among collectors, and widely considered the peak of the original design, it might be something considered by Walther.
 

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The worst part of that gun was the magazine. Why copy that?

M

??? How many feeding issues have you heard of?


The P7 mags are produced from material ~30 thicker then ALL the "wonder 9s" of the era, and have guide slots that guide the follower via rails (more costly to produce).
HK provided vids of shooters slamming cinder block on loaded mags (on concrete slabs), picking them up, inserting into P7M13s and run FLAWLESSLY.
Yeah, those mags have flaws.

The "copy" would be for the purpose of clearing the dual recoil springs in the design of the P5 frame. The top section of the mag would need to be "single stack" width.
 

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Send me one of yours and I'll try it. I've got some concrete slabs here.

Don't worry; according to the vid, it shouldn't hurt your mag at all.

If it's such an efficient design, everybody would have copied it. The only reason for its existence was that H&K balked at the expense of redesigning the P7.

M
 

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Send me one of yours and I'll try it. I've got some concrete slabs here.

Don't worry; according to the vid, it shouldn't hurt your mag at all.

If it's such an efficient design, everybody would have copied it. The only reason for its existence was that H&K balked at the expense of redesigning the P7.

M

Wow, They did it, PERIOD. How about the failures data, or even some links to P7M13 mag issues to support your point with empirical evidence?


I don't abuse my firearms, so no, but thanks for the offer.


COSTLY firearm/mag designs are dropped to keep costs competitive. Seems you're talking out of both sides of your mouth on this. I recall you making this EXACT point in several threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
For the money, seek out a later P1 import; the latest will have a beefed up slide, and hex pin in the frame. Not sure of current pricing, but an excellent-new condition pistol will probably be WAY less than any new production gun, and serve you for many years. Also, being less expensive or rare than WWII versions, you could feel free to modify the P1 and not feel as much remorse over lost "value" later on.
I want it for the historic/cool factor, yes Ill shoot it, but mostly it will be a "look at this" kinda piece
 

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IMHO Extremely unlikely.
He is unfashionable
It is expensive to manufacture.
And most importantly, it requires a production culture that is too high for current manufacturers.
When trained monkeys begin to make weapons, you will have to forget about Rolexes.

PS In the best case, Casio. LOL

PPS For the price of Rolex. LOLLOLLOLLOL
 

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I prefer a post-war later strengthened P1 / P38 over a war time model. I have found the tolerances and accuracy of those to be better suited for shooting purposes. The nicest P38 to have is a post-war P38 with the steel frame, in my opinion.

While the P1/P38 is capable of excellent mechanical accuracy, the shooting scores with the H&K P8 were much better than with the P1. That became especially apparent in the reserves, where both guns had been used side by side for many years.

I personally shot the P1 better, though.
 

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I would like some input by people with hands on experience shooting large amounts of ammo through a Walther P88. Please only reply if you have actual experience in firing at least 7,000 rounds out of your Walther P88, counted not estimated.

It was reported that in the U.S. Military trials of the 1980's Walther submitted 2 P88's both of which cracked their aluminum frames at the 7,000 round mark. Of course we are speaking of full power Nato ammo which was noted on cracking the frames of Beretta 92's but at a far, far higher round count.

So far my P88 has had 3,000 rounds out of it and it was not hot Nato rounds. So far no problems.
 

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"cracking the frames of Beretta 92's"


The slides were cracking, this is why the Brigadier slide is thicker, heavier, and has the distinctive "hump".




EDIT; Disregard, Dropped this in the wrong thread, should have been in the P88 section, on the frame cracking topic.
 

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I prefer a post-war later strengthened P1 / P38 over a war time model.
The post-war steel frames P.38 were the frames of military release either from blanks of that period. ;-)

Aluminum frames have been designed in WW2, tested and rejected due to insufficient strength.
On P1, a more durable aluminum alloy was used. But and that was not the enough too. It had to add steel reinforcement.

In a spiral, the story repeated with P5...

PS On the M9, the thickness of the slider stripes was increased by 0.6 mm. No "humps" like on Brigadier.
Slides to break (as they say) stopped, but the M9 breaks in other places.
One of the reasons for the refusal of the US Army from the M9 was the high demands on the quality of workmanship, which ensured their high cost.

Idiots, should have taken the ̶m̶o̶n̶e̶y̶ P226.
 
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