Walther Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I'm new to this forum.

I recently acquired the P38 shown in the photo. Unfired, presentation box, etc. The brass label came off the box but is inside.

Just wondering what it might be worth. I'd like to sell it but don't want to screw myself in the process. I suspect it might be unusual to find one in this condition.

Thanks,
Garrett
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,722 Posts
That is a beautiful 100 Year Walther P-38 but Commemorative models are usually sold in NIB condition. Firing or even handling these guns can significantly affect their value.
.
The 2012 Blue Book of Gun Values lists the Walther 100 Year P-38 Alloy Frame model in two grades: 100% = $1,200 and 98% = $950. Anything below 98% is valued as a standard commercial model P-38.
.
If you decide to sell your 100 Year P-38 please list it in the Waltherforums Trading Post section. Be sure to post your asking price and several high quality photos... :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,071 Posts
I saw a couple of these advertised on one of the gun auction sites within the past year for $999. What they eventually sold for is anyone's guess.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,071 Posts
Then how does one distinguish between a Postwar P.38 and a P.1? :confused:

R
Essentially, by the stamp that the factory placed on the slide. The postwar pistols also were designated as a P38 (sans full-stop) rather than the wartime P.38, with the full-stop between the P and the 3. Not sure what the logic was there, either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
R,
Another quick way on the later P1s is the hex pin in the frame behind the take down. Early post war P1 alloy frame also are marked with the Mauser banner on the slide; art.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,534 Posts
Silly Germans. Still trying to confuse the rest of the world.

R
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,228 Posts
Right about now someone will come 'round and ask what you'd call a P1 frame with a P38 slide. To make it even better, what if it were a wartime P.38 slide?

Interestingly, I'll bet you cannot interchange a wartime P.38 slide with a post-war frame. I think I remember reading on here long ago the alloy frame is minutely different than the steel version. Or maybe not.

-Pilotsteve
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,914 Posts
I love it. Like a trout.

If you're spoiling for an argument, hang around. Deputy will show up any moment now...

M
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,228 Posts
Aw Steve, take a cold shower.
I am to be scolded once again! Mike must have reprimanded me with this same phrase three times by now!

I had to look it up - the phrase, "Take a cold shower" because I didn't understand what it meant when Mike first said it to me a while ago. I don't remember what it was for... I must have been geeking or rambling over something. It seems to refer to the hypothetical action of suppressing ones' sexual desires or lusts. Intriguing. But no, I must refuse this ribbing because I'll always be very enthusiastic over these wonderful pieces of functional history. Every forum needs their nerd I guess!

It is only now - in this very thread I've learned of the difference in the written designation of this pistols' name. P.38 to P38; I never knew there was a difference. I've even seen P-38 but don't believe the dash is correct. Did this take place immediately after the war when production was resumed? I know it's a trivial fact but an interesting tidbit of knowledge nonetheless.

-Pilotsteve
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top