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Hello everyone,

I just joined but have been reading quite a bit lately. I just purchased my wife a p22 and am a little concerned now. I thought most of the issues were fixed with the new version but we are having some problems.

The first time I took it to the range, I used Federal and Winchester ammo. I had a ton of stovepiping and FTF issues. It was basically unusable. I took the gun home and worked the slide back and forth quite a bit. I then took it back to the range the next day and bought some CCI mini-mags. The new ammo worked much better. I only ran about 50 rounds through it but only had one issue. I also ran some federal and winchester back through it and they also did a little better but still had some FTE. The other issue I saw several times was it looked like a round was chambered but wouldn't fire. I then would manually extract the round via cycling and it would fire the next round just fine. The extracted round was fine and would fire when put back into the magazine.

I'm going through the suggestions and have read the P22 "Bible". I am fairly handy but know VERY little about the specifics of how the parts interact to. Are the recommended fixes still valid or have they cleaned those up with the QD version. The only two issues I can visually see by field stripping mentioned was polishing the ramp and the trigger ears. The ramp looks like it needs cleaned up to me. There appears to be a couple of marks on it. The entrance to the chamber seems to have a ridge... like the ramp meets up about .5 - 1mm below the barrel. Is this where I see people talking about sanding down so the round can more easily be seated in the chamber? Are there any negatives to doing this?

The trigger ears (at least on top) appear to be pretty smooth. Is there any signs I should look for to let me know there might be an issue there?

And lastly, when I manually pull back on the slide, it gets to a point where it seems like more force is needed to fully pull back the slide. The friction point is somewhere around when the hammer becomes cocked.

Thank you everyone.
 

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The so called bible is just some old posts of mine through the years. The original was put together by someone based on stuff I did after owning a P22 for only a couple of weeks. What hasn't changed is that weak ammo will not reliably cycle the slide. This isn't unique to the P22. It takes a certain amount of blowback energy to cock the hammer and cycle the slide. Some ammo just doesn't have enough. CCI mini mags and Remington golden bullets are two brands that are powerful enough.

Some .22 ammo will fire on the second strike, some if rotated in the chamber and some will never fire. CCI is more reliable than some of the less expensive bulk ammo. I shot a bucket of Rem goldens a few months back, about 1,400 rounds and there wasn't one dud. Other times I've run into three or four in a 500 round box. Just something you have to put up with regarding .22 ammo.

What you should do is see if there is a good firing pin mark on a round that doesn't fire. No firing pin mark or a light one and you have other issues.....like, safety on, broken firing pin, firing pin not resetting or if a light strike...a dirty chamber which isn't allowing the round to solidly seat. The first strike seats it and the round usually fires on the second strike. In that case you need to clean the chamber.

There has never been an issue between the feed ramp and the chamber entrance. I did that mod way, way back just to have something to do. The pistol was feeding fine. Walther later began chamfering the lower portion of the chamber entrance.

One thing that is really, really important on these light weight pistols is a firm grip when firing. Lock your wrist and grip the pistol firmly. Limp wristing will allow movement of the pistol to absorb some of the recoil energy....22 or .45. So, firm grip. You just need to shoot the pistol some more clean it, make sure the barrel nut is tight and clean the magazines as well....that means on the inside. The follower must move freely. A clean chamber will allow a round to simply drop in when the muzzle is pointed down. Keep us posted if you have more issues but get some more powerful ammo until the springs have been worked in a bit. 1917
 

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Thanks 1917. I ended up field stripping it and giving it a real good cleaning last night. I just returned from the range and the results are still mixed.

I ran about 30 rounds of CCI mini-mags first. I had one FTE and the spent case ended up getting stuck in the barrel. I then ran about 30 rounds of Remington Golden Bullets with no issues and was optimistic at this point. Put a few more CCI through and had another 2 FTE within 2 magazines. At this point, I wanted to start experimenting so I used some Winchester 1280fps ammo. It cycled fine but it was at this point, the slide began to get locked in the open position. It initally happened once a magazine, then began happening much more often. When I gave up at the range, the slide was locking open about every 2-3 rounds. It was happening on all the ammo I had: CCI mini-mag, Winchester, Remington and Federal. The number of FTE increased at this time too. In the last 50 rounds or so, both would occur at the same time... the round would FTE and the slide locked open.

I'm thinking at this point I may need to get service on it?

Thanks
 

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Could be it needs a trip back but I don't know what for. There are no specific P22 issues I'm aware of that cause the problems you are experiencing. Over the years people have moved from larger pistols to the P22 and sometimes have allowed their hand to drag on the slide...due to the pistol being smaller. Others have allowed their grip to interfere with the slide hold open arm and accidentally knock it upward under recoil...slight as it is. When you say FTE what do you mean? Fail to extract? eject?

If you want to feel how you slide fits on the pistol smoothness wise when cycling removed the recoil spring assembly, remount the slide, make sure it us unloaded, set the safety lever to the fire position and then pull the slide back and forth slowly. You will definitely feel the safety drum engage the hammer and you will feel the drag the hammer exerts as the breech rail drags along it.

You should not be having any really hard notchy movement but the slide does press the cocked hammer down about 0.020" as it moves on top of it.

I don't find the pistol that picky but you absolutely need to keep you hands and fingers where they belong, hold the pistol firmly and fire ammo that is powerful enough. You cannot go by what velocity is on the box. That means nothing in my opinion out of a short barrel pistol. Those velocities are out of rifle barrels. Firm grip.... 1917

If you want to look at ammo velocities by several brands and barrel length try ByTheInch site. The P22 is one of the pistols. You will notice velocity and energy go down considerable as the barrel length shortens. Make sure your slide stop arm moves up and down smoothly. A tiny spring operates it holding it down at all times until the more powerful magazine spring causes the follower button on the left side of the mag to engage it after the last round is removed from the mag. Make sure it moves up and down freely and keep you grip away from it when firing. On my target pistol I removed the whole thing as I don't need the slide to lock back.
 

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It is possible that I may have caused some of the issues. I wanted to make sure I had a good grip so I could have accidentally been pushing up on the slide lock. I'll try another batch of RGB this weekend to see what happens.
 

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I ran into the same issues as you with my QD. After about 100 rounds, things improved. I found that my Winchester ammo with the highest advertised fps had more issue than the CCI with slower fps.


I have clean the gun out, polish the hammer and other parts. Waiting to go back to the range to see. Just racking the gun, things seems to be lot better.
 

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If yours is like my Q there is at least one area on the frame that needs to wear down and I suspect until it does, you may have some issues. There is a little “hump” on the right rear frame, not sure what it’s there for, but the slide action is wearing it down. There are other places along the frame and slide that rub but is a normal metal meets metal thing.

When I got mine, after my experience with my PPK/S .22, I removed the spring and rod, and put the slide back on. Then I sat and watched some TV, and ran the slide back and for several hundred times. Put it all back together and and have had darn few issues. I primarily shoot CCI Mini Mags, CCI Blazers, or Remington GB’s. I don’t give it a real cleaning everytime, but I will drag a bore snake through it after every trip to the range.

The only issue I have with the P22 is the rear slide being loose side to side.
 

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The so called "bump" on the top, rear side of the frame half is tasked with jiggling the firing pin block up and down each time the slide cycles. We have only been able to assume that its job is to make sure the spring loaded firing pin block is jiggled, twice, so that it moves freely. This isn't an issue. BTW, the QD pistol no longer has the bump because the firing pin block is mated to the decocking lever which is operated by the safety drum. So, it appears Walther o longer had room for the part to be jiggle up and down. This is shown in my QD assessment thread. 1917



Above is a photo of a brand new 2013 Q pistol....the one my sister borrowed and I never saw again....lol. Anyway, you can see the small bump on the right side of the top of the frame. Also of note is what I see on every P22 with the new hammer style that came out in about 2007. Looking closely you can see exactly where the small point that is formed between the two angles on the face of the hammer is dragging. This small tip, while much better than the original hammer still drags roughly over the gap between the safety drum and rear of the breech block and I still remove the hammer, roll this tiny tip over some 400 and then 600 grit emery to remove it. That is all that I do, just enough metal removal to remove the tip and create a small curved area that spans the gap. The whole width of work from front to rear is about 1/8"...that is all that is required. If you remove too much your hammer won't be cocked. Ft Smith does not approve work here as some folks take off too much material which then stops the slide from being able to press the hammer rearward enough to reliably cock.



And, essentially the same photo of a new QD model. The bump is gone and a new slot has been added to the safety drum which I assume operates the decocking lever. Also note the out of focus hammer in the rear....prezackly the same wear to the tip on the hammer face as seen on the 2013 pistol. That tip was immediately removed but again, it takes very little removal of material to eliminate it. The hammer is fully hardened. Oops, wrong photo...I'll get the right one.



Here is the only one I can find at present...there is no bump on the right side of the frame on the QD model. Take note also of the new shape of the primary hooks on the hammer. They have been considerably lowered with regard to earlier hooks....I'd say almost half as tall although they fully engage the sear. Trigger jobs routinely lower the hook height on the primary sear. You will see all manner of information on this regarding M1911s....P22s, not so much but I have a few threads on it here. Be very careful with work here...it is absolutely necessary to understand what you are doing and then thoroughly test the safety of your work. You do not want the hammer slipping off the sear until you pull the trigger.
 
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