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I moved this over here from the "welcome" part of the forum. Sorry for my mistake. I don't know how to delete it from the other place.

My wife bought a Walther P22 last summer in part because I have a PP that my father brought back from Germany after flying on the Berlin Airlift in 1948-'49. Yes, it was a Nazi issued gun, and is still very nice. She knew the Walther name stood for quality as my antique is still a great gun.

Today we went to a class that was a precursor to getting our concealed carry permits. The instructors were both gunsmiths. One was also a commissioned sheriffs officer. These are guys who KNOW guns. The class was held at a local indoor shooting range. During a break, one of the other guys who works at the range brought the broken slide of a Walther P22 back to show it to the instructor who was teaching at that time. The entire muzzle end of the slide was broken off, gone. The instructor said that it was the second one he'd seen that way. Both of them were used in rental service at the shooting range. To their credit, they had probably shot 5000 rounds, but that still should't have happened. Then he looked at my wife's gun, removing the slide to inspect it for cracks. He said there is one, but to be honest I can't see it. I will bring my optivisor magnifying goggles home from work tomorrow to get a better look.

My wife is now afraid to shoot her gun. Luckily she had already qualified for the permit with a 25 out of 25 score, so she didn't need to shoot my 7.65mm gun with its more expensive ammo, now using 32ACP.

Has anyone here ever heard of such an issue with the P22?
 

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If you scroll through the P22 threads on this forum, or on the RimFire Central Forum, you'll find plenty of evidence of issues with the P22 through the years. The slides are made of zinc/pot metal and have been know to come apart on occasion. That's not to say that everyone has had issues with the P22; you'll find plenty of fans here and elsewhere. But the problem that you mention is not unknown and at one time was reported quite a bit. I'll also add that this is the first report of a cracked slide that I can remember here in quite a while.

http://www.waltherforums.com/forum/walther-rimfire-co2-pistols/6169-p22-reliability.html

http://www.waltherforums.com/forum/faq-rimfire-co2/10259-vital-information-all-p22-owners.html

These two links should get you started.
 

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Is there some option to enable editing previous posts? I looked at my settings and could not find anything relating to editing posts. Anyone know? Thanks...
 

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Editing currently is reserved for supporting members, with information on how to do that available in the User CP (blue bar at the top) section of the forum. That situation, along with others, is being examined at the moment.
 

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Had problems with my early P22 (bought the first one I saw) and contacted S&W customer service on a Monday morning. Tuesday UPS showed up with a prepaid return box. I put the pistol in and gave it back. My pistol was returned to me fixed on Friday as I recall.

They included a new magazine free with the repaired pistol.

That was a few years ago and I'm still impressed. By all means call them and refer to the above mentioned P22 bible.
 

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Some slides have cracked over the years. The majority of these have been the 5" models. The current thinking is that the recoil spring cup takes a hit when stopping the slide's rearward movement. The cup hits the polymer take down to stop rearward movement. Then, if the stabilizer isn't properly positioned the cup hits the stabilizer as the slide closes. Metal fatigue sets in and eventually the slide cracks exactly where one would expect it to. I have a picture of one somewhere and will see if I can link it. I've fired well over 100K rounds through P22s and have never cracked one. I've also modified my pistol so that the slide really slaps back by removing material under the breech block where the hammer would normally drag.

Still, some have indeed fractured so it would be good advice as with all firearms to make sure you give careful inspection to the pistol each time you clean it. Nearly all firearms has a history of failure on occassion. Revolver, rifle, shotgun......you name it. I've seen pictures of the rear of the bolt broken off of Ruger MK pistols. All steel bolts. Eye and ear protection at all times. M1911

 

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I threw away my $175 laser printer today. It gave me good performance for three years, but it was a product of modern manufacturing philosophy: use it, and when it breaks, throw it away and buy another. The pot-metal P22 is much the same. Not worth fixing.

There was a time when people took enormous pride in the manufacture of firearms, which were made to last several lifetimes, and to be handed down as heirlooms to succeeding generations. I'm trying real hard.. but you know I can't remember seeing a PP-series Walther slide --PP, PPK or PPK/s in any caliber--that had cracked.

It's all a matter of what you want, and expect, and what you are willing to pay for.

M

An afterthought: guns are different from laser printers. Guns elicit a far more intimate relationship, and you should have a soulful bond with an instrument that you might entrust your life to. If it isn't like a loyal and trusted friend, you're really not a Gun Person, and all this is lost on you.
 

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One thing I might add is that the tolerance of the P22 is so tight regarding engagement of the frame rails to the slide grooves that if the slide fractures it is likely that the rear of the slide will pop up and a stoppage will immediately occur. That will keep the next round from chambering and firing with a broken slide. Doubt Walther did that one on purpose.....:) but, they have been manufacturing firearms for a long time. M1911
 

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One thing I might add is that the tolerance of the P22 is so tight regarding engagement of the frame rails to the slide grooves that if the slide fractures it is likely that the rear of the slide will pop up and a stoppage will immediately occur. That will keep the next round from chambering and firing with a broken slide. Doubt Walther did that one on purpose.....:) but, they have been manufacturing firearms for a long time. M1911
I would respectfully suggest to you that the people who designed the P22 were not responsible for the design of any of the guns on which Walther built its reputation.

M
 

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I would respectfully suggest to you that the people who designed the P22 were not responsible for the design of any of the guns on which Walther built its reputation.

M
Would have to agree. Classic Walthers were precision made with German attention to detail and made to last lifetimes. Your P22 should work and serve you well like a BIC pen or an Ironman watch. Inexpensive, servicable and disposible.

My P22 has fired thousands of rounds but will someday be replaced if it stops going bang. It is always disassembled, cleaned and checked for cracks and worn parts after use. That is my rule with all firearms.
 

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I would respectfully suggest to you that the people who designed the P22 were not responsible for the design of any of the guns on which Walther built its reputation.

M
No argument there. Pen and ink on paper with a slide rule nearby back in those days. Machinist and wood worker nearby also. Times have changed, throwaway society. It's not that the P22 can't be repaired or a new slide installed but rue the day that old pistols become so rare that these modern ones become heirloom collectibles. On the other hand, every big Corp seems to be only in it for the money these days and Walther is making a killing on this particular plinker. M1911
 

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I'll go a step further and say that the only companies that give a damn about the long-term quality of the product are those (increasingly few) that are still family-owned. In Walther's case that essentially ended in the 1990s.

M
 

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I still say if Walther would make almost the same gun, but with a steel slide/tenifer finish, and up the craftsmanship just a bit, a lot of people would be willing to pay an extra $150 or so for it.
 

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and tumbled some of the the parts to smooth out the rough edges. Seems to me they could have done that at not much extra cost. It would have helped with a lot of the problems and quality issues.
 

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I still say if Walther would make almost the same gun, but with a steel slide/tenifer finish, and up the craftsmanship just a bit, a lot of people would be willing to pay an extra $150 or so for it.
I would like to believe that, but my instincts (and experience) tell me that it's not true.

There simply are not enough people who understand gun design well enough to recognize the difference. The continued strong sales of S&W Walther PPKs and PPK/Ss demonstrate that. People who ought to take the time to think and who should know better, don't.

It's pathetic, actually. Since a huge drop in sales is the only thing that gets their attention, as WAL-MART recently acknowledged.

M
 

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Well, look at the products in general that we buy. It isn't just pistols. I have had to repair my house AC every year. Top of the line expensive stuff too. Digital cameras, amazing for the price and good for three years. Then you buy another. And that expensive I Phone or Computer......it will be outdated in three years if not before. Blue jeans don't last like they did when I was a kid. You can buy a 40 year roof but I can tell you it will be worn out in 20. Oh it might not leak but will look awful.

So, I think we are all being conditioned to get the latest and fastest and damn the long term reliability. The world is changing too fast for that. On the other other hand....I have a number of fine steel .22s that are sitting in the safe because the digital camera of .22 pistols gets all the shootin time. :) M1911
 

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It's the story of the Hathaway dress shirt company, factory in Maine, finest quality, symbol was a man with an eye patch. They made uniform shirts in the Civil War, specialized in dress shirts for 150 years and went out of business in the 1990's. I wore a 1980's Hathaway to a wedding last week. It looks brand new after 100's of trips to the cleaners.

They were put out of business when shirts made in Sri Lanka and Costa Rica started showing up. They looked good and cost half the price of a Hathaway.
They last a few years.

Market studies are done long before any product is put on a dealer's shelf to determine what a customer will pay and what they expect as to quality. Disposability is built into most consumer products.
 
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