Walther Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all - new to the forum and looking to learn about a coupe Walther pistols I bought many years ago. First up, is a P38.

I've had this P38 for over 45 years and just now trying to find some information about it. It is not one I use very often and primarily just stays cleaned and in storage.

Secondly after last trip to the range, I noticed the locking block is cracked on one side. I don't know much about all the markings on it or any background history.

I've posted some photos so that someone may be able to inform me about it. Thanks, and looking forward to learning a lot here.
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Wood
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Revolver
Font Metal Gun accessory Composite material Electric blue

Hood Automotive design Eyewear Gadget Automotive exterior

Bumper Automotive exterior Material property Office equipment Vehicle door
Material property Auto part Rim Automotive design Electric blue
Automotive tire Bicycle part Gas Machine Electric blue
Hood Automotive exterior Eyewear Bumper Tints and shades
Window Office equipment Personal luxury car Audio equipment Gadget
Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Tints and shades Auto part
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Wood
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Revolver
Font Metal Gun accessory Composite material Electric blue
Hood Automotive design Eyewear Gadget Automotive exterior
Bumper Automotive exterior Material property Office equipment Vehicle door
Material property Auto part Rim Automotive design Electric blue
Automotive tire Bicycle part Gas Machine Electric blue
Hood Automotive exterior Eyewear Bumper Tints and shades
Window Office equipment Personal luxury car Audio equipment Gadget
Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Tints and shades Auto part
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Wood
Air gun Trigger Gun barrel Gun accessory Revolver
Font Metal Gun accessory Composite material Electric blue
Hood Automotive design Eyewear Gadget Automotive exterior
Bumper Automotive exterior Material property Office equipment Vehicle door
Material property Auto part Rim Automotive design Electric blue
Automotive tire Bicycle part Gas Machine Electric blue
Hood Automotive exterior Eyewear Bumper Tints and shades
Window Office equipment Personal luxury car Audio equipment Gadget
Bumper Automotive exterior Rim Tints and shades Auto part
 

Premium Member
Joined
3,977 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

It looks like you have an ex-police gun. The "X" on the right side of the frame is a canceled police property mark. Probably BMI (federal police).

Unfortunately the locking block is a known weak spot but you should be able to find a replacement. It will probably need to be fitted.
 

Registered
Joined
200 Posts
Welcome to the forum.

It looks like you have an ex-police gun. The "X" on the right side of the frame is a canceled police property mark. Probably BMI (federal police).

Unfortunately the locking block is a known weak spot but you should be able to find a replacement. It will probably need to be fitted.
As an ex BMI firearm should this pistol not be a P1? Holster looks to be correct for this.
 

Registered
Joined
1,630 Posts
As an ex BMI firearm should this pistol not be a P1? Holster looks to be correct for this.
No, the proof marks were interagency help but the pistol was most likely used by the police, which received P38s past 1963 and also P1s. The fact that the gun is owned for about 45 years also indicates German police use; the P1/P38s were surplusses when they switched to different guns and then finally to the P5/P6 and P7.
 

Registered
Joined
929 Posts
Hello all - new to the forum and looking to learn about a coupe Walther pistols I bought many years ago. First up, is a P38.

I've had this P38 for over 45 years and just now trying to find some information about it. It is not one I use very often and primarily just stays cleaned and in storage.

Secondly after last trip to the range, I noticed the locking block is cracked on one side. I don't know much about all the markings on it or any background history.

I've posted some photos so that someone may be able to inform me about it. Thanks, and looking forward to learning a lot here. View attachment 109139 View attachment 109140 View attachment 109141
View attachment 109142
View attachment 109143 View attachment 109144 View attachment 109145 View attachment 109146 View attachment 109147 View attachment 109148 View attachment 109139 View attachment 109140 View attachment 109141 View attachment 109142 View attachment 109143 View attachment 109144 View attachment 109145 View attachment 109146 View attachment 109147 View attachment 109148 View attachment 109139 View attachment 109140 View attachment 109141 View attachment 109142 View attachment 109143 View attachment 109144 View attachment 109145 View attachment 109146 View attachment 109147 View attachment 109148
Welcome from Northern Indiana enjoy the conversation.
 

Registered
Joined
9 Posts
Removing and re-fitting a locking block is very easy and would probably take five minutes of your time.

Buy a new forged block. The cracked block in the photo is probably cast, which are far more brittle. More often, the cracking of cast blocks is limited to one of the 'ears' of the block, not across the width.

Fitting a new block is sometimes required and you can also do this at home. First, insert the new block into the barrel and then fit the barrel/slide together. Now guide the assembly onto the frame. If there is any resistance, it is almost always because the bottom of the new block is contacting the frame.
Use a sheet of 600 grit emery cloth on a flat surface and run the block bottom across , ( oiling the emery is advisable), for a few dozen strokes, using mild pressure and maintaining contact across the entire surface. Now clean the residue and trial fit the block. If there is still resistance, repeat the emery treatment and try again. It often takes more than a few tries before the block is adjusted. When satisfied, give the new block a good polishing with a 1,000 grit, or higher, until you have a mirror finish. Wipe away any residue and use a high temperature grease on the block and frame contact point.

With a fitted, forged block, you will probably never have any further problems there.
 

Registered
Joined
9 Posts
Thanks! Appreciate your comment.

I had an ear from a cast block break while on the range a while back, so speak from experience. I'm certainly no gunsmith but not all malfunctions require higher education. In my case, it just jammed the slide on a '65 P-1, ( ex police). My personal feeling is ,just as an engine needs lubrication, so do firearms.
I fire the P-1 and a wartime Spreewerk P38, ( Z block), pretty often, using a later slide and barrel with the Spreewerk frame, though sometimes use the original 1945 components for a magazine or two.
Also have a P38 in.22 cal. Very nice shooter with almost no recoil but a bit pricey compared to the 9mm versions.

The P38 is a wonderful and timeless design and when cared for, will give great service...and fun!
 

Registered
Joined
9 Posts
My pistol came with one mag. but I later bought a second, new one. They seem to be reliable with no feeding problems, however; sometimes there are a number of ammo failures, despite hard strikes of the firing pin. One other occasional problem is with some ammo cases not ejecting fully.
When a round fails to fire, I re-insert that round into the chamber, rotated to a new position from the original strike and try again. Just seems that .22 rimfire lacks the consistent reliability of centerfire.
No pistol problems though, other than the ammo fails.
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for all the infor on this. I found a new block and is on the way. Will use 600 grit and sand down then 1000/1500 and polish for final fit. This is a fun pistol to shoot. I need a little more range time with it though. Get a pretty good grouping but most are around 1-2 Inches low on the target.
 

Premium Member
Joined
3,977 Posts
I need aGet a pretty good grouping but most are around 1-2 Inches low on the target.
You can adjust your windage by replacing the front sight. Starting in the late 1960's Walther started making front sights of various heights with a number stamped on the side to differentiate them.

I've found that a #2 front sight will give me a zero at seven yards with a 12 o'clock hold.

By the way, are you a pilot?

Auto part Carmine Rock
 

Registered
Joined
9 Posts
Just take your time and eventually, the block will be fitted to just where needed.
I had to lower the front sights on my P-1 and another, spare P-1 barrel. My points of impact were also as low as yours, despite adjusting my aim point, etc. The .22 shot a bit high, so I sent for a higher front and that went a long way toward correcting things. My wartime pistol won't be 'doctored' though, only refreshed springs, etc. No permanent changes.
They are fun to shoot!
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You can adjust your windage by replacing the front sight. Starting in the late 1960's Walther started making front sights of various heights with a number stamped on the side to differentiate them.

I've found that a #2 front sight will give me a zero at seven yards with a 12 o'clock hold.

By the way, are you a pilot?

View attachment 109161
Yes. Have been an active pilot since 1974. Now own current antique play-thing. 1946 Piper J3 Cub. Almost as fun as... well - first thing that comes to mind.馃槅
 

Registered
Joined
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Got the replacement block and I sanded as suggested. Got the micrometer out. Measured in several different aspects. It is 1 / 1000 (if that) under a tiny bit on the bottom from the one that came out. Otherwise everything measures up just fine. It was a bit more tedious to reassemble the barrel / slide to the frame. Moreso than the one that came out of it. Maybe the old one was just too loose? Taking apart is just fine and not binding anywhere. Once it's all mated back up, it seems fine and the action is fine. Should I keep sanding on the bottom to ...say .002 difference so the slide and barrel are easier to go back together on the frame? Have not fired it yet. Ideas ? Tips ?
 

Registered
Joined
200 Posts
Got the replacement block and I sanded as suggested. Got the micrometer out. Measured in several different aspects. It is 1 / 1000 (if that) under a tiny bit on the bottom from the one that came out. Otherwise everything measures up just fine. It was a bit more tedious to reassemble the barrel / slide to the frame. Moreso than the one that came out of it. Maybe the old one was just too loose? Taking apart is just fine and not binding anywhere. Once it's all mated back up, it seems fine and the action is fine. Should I keep sanding on the bottom to ...say .002 difference so the slide and barrel are easier to go back together on the frame? Have not fired it yet. Ideas ? Tips ?
My approach, for what it's worth, is to try small at first. Obviously dry cycling with a few dummy rounds then maybe some low power home loads to build up on a 'see how you go' basis? It is a P38 after all - they're very robust!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top