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Discussion Starter #1
I just picked up my 1966 Ulm PPK in 9mm Kurz. The seller said it was in mint condition, but to me it almost looks to be unfired. It came in the original box.

When stripping it, I note that instead of being lubricated with oil, it has a reddish-brown grease. It looks exactly like the grease I’ve seen inside the gearboxes for electric window and headlight motors on 1960s and 1970s Italian cars, which is very distinctive and unlike anything I’ve ever seen here. I tried taking a photo but in the photo the grease just looks black, but it’s not. It’s the same color as the grips.

What were these guns shipped with? Could it really be the original grease from the factory???
 

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Not factory original. I own a 1969 PPK/s and a 1971 PP, both of which I bought new. No grease. And no Walthers left the factory unfired.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I love Rig grease. I’ve been using it on my Auto Mags and stainless Detonics for years. But I assure you this isn’t that stuff. Rig has an amber color and a distinctive smell. This stuff is much more brown, and really looks like old Italian automotive bearing grease. Photos below in the daylight likely show the color better. It’s about the same as the grips.

I will likely remove it and start fresh before I fire it.
 

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If it is 1966 original Walther grease STOP!!! Don’t shoot it ... put it back in the box and place it in a dark room.

;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Don’t worry. Although this PPK turned out to be better than I was looking for, it won’t prevent me from shooting the hell out of it. I’m planning on buying 500 rounds of Speer Lawman 95 gr TMJ ammo, and also have bought a RCBS carbide die set, so once the factory ammo has been fired I will start reloading the empty brass.

I have no safe queens....
 

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Yah, get out and fire the damn thing or resell it for a hell of a profit if it is such a collectors item.
 

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Cosmoline. Beautiful piece. good find!
 

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Guy on the Colt forum had a blue Python in factory plastic, with factory grease still on it...the question was, 'should I take it out of the bag?' :rolleyes:

Happy to hear the OP is going to shoot this, grease or no grease.
Moon
 

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While I completely agree with you MGMike, the fact is the "collecting" hobby, if you will, has really changed over time. The things we collect are no longer what they appear to be. Be they firearms, cars, or whatever, they are all now nothing but assets. Things to be purchased because they will turn a profit at some later date, and shield your wealth from the vicissitudes of Wall Street.

It has ruined my other hobby, and livelihood, antique/vintage automobiles. Every vehicle is now viewed on how it will appreciate, and that only happens if every aspect is 100% perfect, which means you better not drive and enjoy them as automobiles, as you might get a drop of oil on the under carriage... People are just no fun anymore.
 

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... the fact is the "collecting" hobby, if you will, has really changed over time. The things we collect are no longer what they appear to be. Be they firearms, cars, or whatever, they are all now nothing but assets. Things to be purchased because they will turn a profit at some later date, and shield your wealth from the vicissitudes of Wall Street.
...

People are just no fun anymore.
Sadly, I believe that is true. It's shallow and materialistic, and the owner has deprived himself of the beauty and functionality of a mechanical creation.

I'm reminded of the Lee-Enfield rifles imported about 25 years ago. Some of them were virtually new, in sticky cloth mummy wrap. Some collectors agonized over unwrapping such a rifle because it was "original" and it would somehow destroy the rifle's virginity and therefore depreciate its value. So they kept it not only insulated from any possibility of use or enjoyment, but hidden from view besides.

The idea, I suppose, was to preserve its future appeal to some (as yet unmet) ascetic with equally abstemious ideas. But how can one derive any worthwhile pleasure from an item when he can't even see it?

It's also true that some view such items as an "investment" hedge against another Wall Street crash. But the fact is that --like many popular stocks-- much of the "appreciation" is hot air, sustainable only when people have a lot of money and are willing to spend it. In a real economic crisis the demand for arcane items of little practical value tends to evaporate. There is a much wider market for things you can enjoy.

M
 

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Collecting takes many forms. If your collecting goal is profit there are things one can collect, use for the intended purpose, and not lose value from said use.
 

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Unless you are waaaaaaay out on the end of the bell curve in terms of being anal-retentive, or the gun in question is of such amazing provenance (the Lincoln derringer or the Hitler Walther), there's no harm in having your cake while still enjoying it.
Spot on, Jimbo. Most of us here like to use our possessions. It doesn't mean we abuse or neglect them.
Personally, I make a distinction between 'use' and 'carry'.

Moon
 
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