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I see Walther is listing a stainless version of the PPK/S 22lr in the new catalogue. Is this another typo or is this really replacing the Nickel plated Zinc gun? Love shooting my black Zymax gun and would love to add a stainless gun matching my 380. Anyone have real information? Is it just the slide or includes the frame etc? Interested as a range toy, so not looking to start a comparison to previous Real Walthers hater thread. 😊 Thanks!
 

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I like my PPK/S in .22lr just fine too. I am fairly sure it’s the nickel. It would most certainly weigh more. As far as typo’s they haven’t done a good job of proofing the specs sheets. Seems the black one as only a 6.1 trigger pull. Not a DA/SA but the “silver” does.
 

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I see Walther is listing a stainless version of the PPK/S 22lr in the new catalogue. Is this another typo or is this really replacing the Nickel plated Zinc gun?
The information on the website is about as true as the mentioned .04" DA trigger travel distance. It's wrong for years now. :eek:

By the way, the height of the PPK/S .22 is 4.9" according to the estimates on the website (there, the height of the PPK/S models in .380 is 4.3" and the height of the PPK models in .380 is 3.8"). The awful website nonetheless still calls the PPK/S .22 a 1-to-1 scale of the Walther PPK/S in .380. :rolleyes:



Stainless is the new zinc alloy... ;)
 

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For the OP, if you want a steel .22, track down a Manurhin/Ulm example; they are out there.
If it really has to be silver, have it hardchromed.
It will be well worth the trouble.
Moon
 
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In the early '80s some Walther Banner-marked but wholly Manurhin-made PPK/s pistols imported with blued finish were refinished by Interarms in electroless-nickel to simulate stainless. This was a matte finish, not glittery bright, and beautifully done. Interarms re-labeled the boxes "NiVel" (a combination of nickel and velvet). Some pistols in .22LR were included in this program.

Nivel turned out to be a very demanding and painstaking process, as the new guns had to be totally disassembled, degreased and very finely sandblasted to remove the blue and give proper "tooth" for the nickel. The slightest contamination ruined the job, and it would have to be redone.

Unlike traditional electroplating, which has a soft copper layer under the nickel, Nivel was only a few microns thick but produced a surface much harder than the steel, including inside the bore; it made the action fit a little tighter all over and very slick. All the steel parts except the springs were plated.

It was a durable finish but not impervious to corrosion, as people with acidic perspiration soon learned. Grip straps could turn blackish, though this could be removed (one or twice) with Hoppe's No.9. Auto wax to prevent its recurrence was the best solution.

The process was discontinued when the Interarms/Manurhin relationship ended c.1984, though Manurhin went on to develop its own "Durogard" finish, imported for a few years afterward.

Compared to .380, the .22LR PPK/s was never a hot seller (something on the order of 9-1), so the Nivel .22s are seldom encountered. But they do exist.

M
 
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