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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found this one today with a little bit of a story. Son selling for Father, set in the draw and never fired. Yep, we all heard this story before. So I start looking it over. Non original box, looks like a Walther's box but larger with same texture and finish. It has pistol, holster, manual, test target, cleaning rod and tool. Plus ammo fitted in cartridge slots. Original receipt dated 3/97 to Father. The Son has ID with same last name.

I am still getting story of never shot. Out side appearance is as close to mint as one can get. I ask if he would mind if I field strip the pistol. He agreed and I disassembled. Pistol had the original packing grease (hard caked rusty colored and stuck like crazy). Non the less very happy to snag this one. I was thinking the serial number in the 1991 range and funny the receipt in 3/97. I just wonder if one could set around for so long after production? Test target only has month/day so no help there. Anyway that is todays story and I am sticking to it.

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have to make a correction on the above date. After looking closer at the original receipt it is March, 1992 not 1997. Solves that mystery.
 

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I'd be less concerned about the story and be looking at the pistol. Sure one can sit around for a long time and no harm come to it. They are made to be fired...perhaps it was, perhaps not, perhaps not much. Perhaps not even purchased new by the Dad. Not too important to me. I'd mostly be wondering if it would run 100% with fmj ammo and looking to make sure nothing had been bubba'd, especially at the feed ramp. Agree on a price, ask can you test it to make sure it runs as it should. Then finish your purchase. 1917



This is a '92 as well. The SN is listed in the thread that was started to document these pistols. I can tell because the target was dated and the SN falls in line with other pistols from '92 manufacture. I have no idea of the history of this pistol...fired a few times or many. The mags did not show any scratches and the owner could not cycle the slide so he didn't shoot it. We were landscaping his yard, brought it out, asked could I cut the recoil spring in half...uh, no. So he reboxed it said, here, take it, I don't want it. I happened to have had a .32 PP in the truck. He couldn't cycle that either. Bigger guy than I. He needs to get an axe and start splitting some firewood and toughen up a bit.
 

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As 1917 said check is over, but if it is truly a stock IA PPK you have a great find. Clean it to get rid of the caked on grease and take it out and shoot it. Get good factory FMJ ammo and start putting rounds through it. Clean it properly and repeat. Start with 95 grain bullets and stay away from what I call boutique loads. When you can fire 100 rounds, with no malfunctions, it will be broken in. Then you can start looking for other ammo. This can be a chore but is doable.

I personally think these IA's are very good pistols, if you do your part. Stay away from so called + pressure ammo (no such thing in .380), use proper cleaning practices and work it in over several range trips and don't start trying to fix it if it is not truly broken. You will then have a pistol you will be happy with. I still smile when I get done at the range with my IA PPK/S, every time. Best of luck.

Duncan
 
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