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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

Just picked up my PPS tonight, so I thought I'd make an introduction. SHOT Show 2015 was a disappointing event for me as Glock didn't release a subcompact single stack 9MM. Thus I decided to checkout what's on the market. Last week I to the range and shot Glock 26, XDs, Shield, Kahr CM9, and PPS. I liked both Shield and PPS, they both have their plus and minuses, but at the end I went with PPS because I'm more accurate with it. Luckily, I saw Herr Walther's post and was able to pick up a PPS for $449 from Shoot Straight.

However, it didn't take me too long to find out that my Large backstrap wasn't locking onto the grip. It was popping out like this video and wouldn't latch. I tried the method mentioned in the FAQ, where the OP recommended installing the backstrap with slide open, but that wasn't working either. Only then did I realize what I was doing wrong. After matching up the index dots, I would try to push the backstrap down with the backstrap flush to grip (see below); However, this intuitive way of installation was wrong.

Wrong way (Pushing down while flush):


The correct (manual) way of installing the backstrap is:
1. Match up the index dots
2. Push the backstrap down while angled, only the top of the backstrap and the stick inside should touch the grip.
3. Push the backstrap horizontally toward the grip (there is a "click" when the backstrap latches on).

See the photo in the manual:



To get the large blackstrap to lock on, I really have to follow the manual method. Where as the small backstrap would lock on even if I'm not following the manual, and doing step 3 before step 2. I'm not sure if Walther modified their mould for the backstrap for PPS over the years, but by simply following the manual I was able to get my 2014 PPS large backstrap to work.

Here is my PPS with its Austrian cousin:



Happy Shooting!
 

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Greetings and welcome, PPS21. I'm sure that you will now agree that when installed properly, the likelihood of that strap disconnecting accidently during use is between 0 and 00. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, sir. When installed properly it actually lock on so tight that I wonder if it will ever come off. :eek:
 

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Welcome and thank you for posting the pics, I don't even acknowledge the backstrap, I just treat it as if it's permanent. I too have become very disappointed with Glock and the hopes of a ss 9. I get a kick out of the fan boys that always said the 380 round was useless, now they say it's all about shot placement.
In reality I am glad Glock turned me back the the PPS, I shoot it more accurately than some of my Glocks and it is far thinner than any 9mm Glock.
Once you determine which backstrap is best for you, I say forget it exists.
 

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Reload Can Cause Backstrap Removal...?

I have a question/comment about the backstrap which I haven't seen addressed in any other threads - and I have searched.

While I agree that one should just ignore the backstrap and take it off (just about) never, there is one very concerning issue for me with the design of the backstrap safety.

Let me first say that I have never experienced this during any live fire shooting drills (with plenty of reloads mixed in with "stressful" drills), and I have about 1,200 rds through my PPS. BUT, it is most definitely possible to fumble a reload and engage the backstrap tab with a loaded magazine during a reload - thus rendering the gun useless until you can reconnect the backstrap properly. I've repeated this time and time again (with action closed and an empty chamber), hoping that it wasn't true. But, it is true. If you bring a loaded magazine up to the mag well, with the rds facing the proper direction, just an inch or so too far back from the mag well, you can indeed engage the backstrap tab with the tip of the top rd in the magazine. (Full disclosure: I have not tried this with the slide locked open.)

I think it is highly unlikely to ever reproduce this accidentally during live fire drills or a self-defense situation. Again, I've never done it in my 1,200 rds. But, I've never done a combat or tactical reload in a "real" situation where I imagine one's hands would be incredible clenched/shaky. With Murphy's law essentially being the reason we carry in the first place, it seems crazy to me to have another "what if" wrinkle to deal with in a bad situation.

I hope I'm not repeating a previous thread (again, i did search). Just curious what others think about this. All the threads I could dig up were discussing removing/switching backstraps or failures over time. I'm concerned about the user-induced failure during a reload.
 

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I have never experienced this, but it is possible it could happen.

When I was trained during the Illinois mandatory 40 hour firearms class for law enforcement officers we were taught to keep the magazines bullets forward and upon pulling a magazine from the carrier, your weak hand forefinger is to be placed on the front side of the mag near the top.

This finger placement is used to help guide the magazine into the well. If you were hitting anything with the magazine body it is hopeful you would be hitting the front edge of the magwell and not the rear edge.

This is a very personal sized defense handgun. If you really need another magazine you may have worse problems than the backstrap popping off.

Hopefully though it gets inserted properly and you can continue firing if needs be.
 
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No issue with the backstrap on my new PPS. Put 200 rounds through it and don't see it ever coming loose. Installed Talon grips so I'm pretty certain it's not ever coming off.
 

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I disabled the backstrap disconnect on my M1 by removing the strut and spring. It's a 5 minute procedure, but some are reluctant to do it. I'm very glad to see the M2 got rid of this liability of a useless "feature". One or two threads about it failing on people is enough for me to not want it on my carry piece. Call me autistic, but that's just the way it is. I want simplicity, not room for failure.
 

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I disabled the backstrap disconnect on my M1 by removing the strut and spring. It's a 5 minute procedure, but some are reluctant to do it...
I studied the design but was reluctant to do it. I noticed that removing the strut assembly (with spring) will still leave the decocker piece in place next to the trigger bar. The decocker piece is part 12.7 on this page: http://www.carlwalther.com/docs/pps_2753880.pdf

With the strut assembly (with spring) removed, if the gun is hit with force or dropped, there does not appear to be anything to stop the decocker piece from exerting force on the trigger bar and possibly decocking the gun. Do you agree?
 

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I disabled the backstrap disconnect on my M1 by removing the strut and spring. It's a 5 minute procedure, but some are reluctant to do it. I'm very glad to see the M2 got rid of this liability of a useless "feature". One or two threads about it failing on people is enough for me to not want it on my carry piece. Call me autistic, but that's just the way it is. I want simplicity, not room for failure.
do you have pics of how to remove the back strap disconnect ? I would really appreciate it.
 

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Bicycle inner tube cut and used as a grip sleeve improves handling and helps prevent the chance of the backstrap failing. imho
 

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I just put Talon grips on my Classic apart from improving the grip it locks the backstrap in place mind you in the five years i’ve had my PPS INCLUDING A COUPLE OF BAD FALLS I’VE NEVER HAD A BACKSTRAP FAILURE!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
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