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Just bought a brand new PPK in 380. Not a PPKS ( not that it matters I assume ). Having lots a failure to feeds. Will attach photo of issue. I searched high and low for failures caused by a loaded chamber indicator , but it seems to block the round from getting the angle it needs to enter chamber. Have not tried shooting it without the LCI on yet but I will soon enough. Just wanted some feedback. Also don’t roast me to hard, first PPK I’ve ever owned. Wanted to see if anyone else had this issue.
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Welcome to the forum.

The PPK in .380 is prone to limp wristing. The next time you're at the range hold on to the grip harder. I would also try several different ammunition brands and bullet weights.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to the forum.

The PPK in .380 is prone to limp wristing. The next time you're at the range hold on to the grip harder. I would also try several different ammunition brands and bullet weights.
So are we Just glossing over the fact that the chamber indicator is clearly blocking it ?
 

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Does this happen only when you chamber the first round, or does it occur when firing the pistol?

If it happens just when chambering the first round, you might be riding the slide forward.

When you chamber a round, you should pull the slide all the way to the rear and then let slam forward

Also, remove the slide and push on the LCI (signal pin). It should be under spring tension, but should move freely when you push on it and when you release it.
 

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If it continues to jam, get in touch with Walther. CS is reportedly very good. I don't think the LC Indicator is a problem but I might be wrong.
 

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So I went thru quite a bit of this the first year I owned my Fort Smith PPK. It almost always happened towards the end of my time at the range which made me think I was getting fatigued and limp wristing.
I shipped it back to Walther last year anyway and they couldn’t find anything wrong with it. In fact they sent a video of their gun smith totally rapid firing at the range and showing it who was boss.
Determined to make it work I went back to the range and kept my right wrist as firm and as straight as possible while taking my left hand and slightly pulling back on my right fingers and had a successful day at the range with zero malfunctions.
If that does not work, call Walther and open a warranty claim and ship it back.
The PPK is the mid 1980’s Porsche 911 of the pistol world: Lots of nostalgia and very satisfying when it runs well but it’s very easy to stall it out if you do not handle the clutch properly.
I have added a PPS M2 and a P99 AS to the EDC rotation and the PPK does not get carried very often now.
Best of luck, I hope you get things sorted out and get to where you can enjoy the PPK and carry with confidence.
 

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I'd try the warranty route if it is meant to be your carry/car/backup gun and you are not confident of it being reliable then it might as well be a safe queen.

On the other hand, if you are a little handy with "minor disassemble/reassembly" (YouTube to the rescue) just remove the thing and shoot without it. If you take the LCI out and it never jams again (say 100 rounds) then your confidence is well founded and it belongs in the front defense lineup roster. I sold my last modern "used" PPK because the nut case owner modified the crap out of everything and I never could reestablish a fundamental base of 100% reliability - NOTHING else matters more when you carry
 

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I hope I can give you some insight into this problem. I shoot several different 380s, and I can tell you that almost every 380 I have used has this problem. I don't think that it is a design flaw in the pistol or the round. It is simply a different beast. YOU CANNOT HOLD A 380 GINGERLY! If you do it will fail to feed properly. They all require a firm grip with every shot fired. Of all the 380s I have access to, my Fort Smith PPK/s First Edition is the least prone to fail to feed. My Colt Mustang XSP is a bit more problematic, and my friends Smith & Wesson Bodyguard is a nightmare. Others have the same issue. However if held properly with a firm grip, they all operate flawlessly.

I have a Kahr PM40 (a very small 40 cal S&W) that I can hold as gently as you can imagine, and it never fails to feed. My Sig P938 (also a small pistol) in 9mm is the same. However, if I hold any of my 380s as gently, they will fail to feed repeatedly. I grew up shooting revolvers, mainly 357s, and I was always told to hold the pistol gently and let it do its work. The 380 broke me of that habit, and I am a much better shot because of it. Master the 380 and you will see an improvement in your ability with every pistol you pickup.

Try this for a start. (This assumes you are right handed) Hold the pistol in your right hand with your fingers wrapped around the front of the grip as normal and with a firm grip. Place your left hand over your right with the fingers wrapped over the fingers of the right hand. Now, push forward with your right hand, while maintaining a firm grip, and pull back with the left hand. This will provide a very solid base for shooting the 380 without a failure to feed. It will also make your aim more steady with any pistol. By the time you have mastered this grip, you will have gained respect and confidence in the reliability of your PPK.

By the way, your PPK does not like to be dirty. Accumulated residue in the chamber will cause your PPK to fail to feed regardless of how you hold it. I keep a bore snake handy and use it after every 50 rounds or so. I also clean the pistol completely after each range session, and I lubricate all bearing surfaces with a good quality gun grease.

With a little effort on your part, you should enjoy shooting your 380 almost as much as I enjoy shooting mine, and that pleasure should continue for many years.
 

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My wife has a PPK/S, and she has similar failures to feed from limp twisting. When I run it, it functions just fine. You really do have to lock everything up with this pistol.
 

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Suggest to your wife that she use a two handed grip. She should push forward with her strong gun hand and pull back with her weak hand. She will be pleasantly surprised how well this works.

I suppose that a malfunctioning loaded chamber indicator could contribute to this problem, but many 380s that don't have such indicators experience failure to feed, and this problem often occurs with one shooter but not with another shooter using the very same pistol. If the gun owner experiences failure to feed problems and the gun smith (experienced with shooting a 380) does not, it would suggest that the problem is not with the pistol.
 

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y
I hope I can give you some insight into this problem. I shoot several different 380s, and I can tell you that almost every 380 I have used has this problem. I don't think that it is a design flaw in the pistol or the round. It is simply a different beast. YOU CANNOT HOLD A 380 GINGERLY! If you do it will fail to feed properly. They all require a firm grip with every shot fired. Of all the 380s I have access to, my Fort Smith PPK/s First Edition is the least prone to fail to feed. My Colt Mustang XSP is a bit more problematic, and my friends Smith & Wesson Bodyguard is a nightmare. Others have the same issue. However if held properly with a firm grip, they all operate flawlessly.

I have a Kahr PM40 (a very small 40 cal S&W) that I can hold as gently as you can imagine, and it never fails to feed. My Sig P938 (also a small pistol) in 9mm is the same. However, if I hold any of my 380s as gently, they will fail to feed repeatedly. I grew up shooting revolvers, mainly 357s, and I was always told to hold the pistol gently and let it do its work. The 380 broke me of that habit, and I am a much better shot because of it. Master the 380 and you will see an improvement in your ability with every pistol you pickup.

Try this for a start. (This assumes you are right handed) Hold the pistol in your right hand with your fingers wrapped around the front of the grip as normal and with a firm grip. Place your left hand over your right with the fingers wrapped over the fingers of the right hand. Now, push forward with your right hand, while maintaining a firm grip, and pull back with the left hand. This will provide a very solid base for shooting the 380 without a failure to feed. It will also make your aim more steady with any pistol. By the time you have mastered this grip, you will have gained respect and confidence in the reliability of your PPK.

By the way, your PPK does not like to be dirty. Accumulated residue in the chamber will cause your PPK to fail to feed regardless of how you hold it. I keep a bore snake handy and use it after every 50 rounds or so. I also clean the pistol completely after each range session, and I lubricate all bearing surfaces with a good quality gun grease.

With a little effort on your part, you should enjoy shooting your 380 almost as much as I enjoy shooting mine, and that pleasure should continue for many years.
Have you ever been able to get a Beretta 84/85 to jam? They are in 380.

I am just curious. I have an 85FS in nickel and can say for a fact that the thing is crazy reliable. Easily as reliable as my 92. No jams, no stovepipes, no nothing.
 

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y

Have you ever been able to get a Beretta 84/85 to jam? They are in 380.

I am just curious. I have an 85FS in nickel and can say for a fact that the thing is crazy reliable. Easily as reliable as my 92. No jams, no stovepipes, no nothing.
 

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Sorry, I should have been more specific in my discussion. Most of my 380 experience has been with small frame 380s - "mouse guns" that are easily carried. My PPK/s is probably the largest 380 that I shoot with any regularity.

As you suggest, larger frame 380s do not seem to have the tendency to fail to feed; however, I could be a little biased in that opinion. I never had the opportunity to shoot a larger 380 until well after I learned to handle the mouse guns properly. By that time failure to feed problems were a distant memory for me. I simply don't experience the problem any more unless I actively try to create the failure or the pistol is really dirty.

I assume this problem is a function of balancing the power of the round, the mass of the pistol, and the tension of the recoil spring. The mouse guns probably do not have enough mass to allow these factors to be balanced efficiently. To that end, I am curious about the S&W EZ 380. Does its light recoil spring cause it to fail to feed? Just a thought.
 

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FWIW, my 0.02: every metal-on-metal firearm I've had requires wear-in so there isn't undue drag on the slide (or locking mechanism which is irrelevant to this one) as it cycles. I had the same with my PPK/S occasionally until about round 150 or 200 and since then flawless. In the interim a grease like "Shooter's Choice" for me works better than an oil. Ref. The PX4 Compact might be my DA/SA Glock 19 - Page 406 (pistol-forum.com)

Poly frames haven't been this way for me; 100% from round one for my 42, but obviously you want this one to work, not the firearm you didn't buy.
 

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So are we Just glossing over the fact that the chamber indicator is clearly blocking it ?
I'm not sure that it is. I think plenty of people do not understand how the loaded chamber indicator works. True it could be binding for some reason, dirt, bent so the first thing to check would be for free movement of the part This can be done with your fingers slide off. The nose of the part should easily lift up and freely move front to rear. The rim of a cartridge presses it up. When the slide closes the top of the chamber presses the part rearward to show that a round is in the chamber. The rim of the cartridge does not press the part rearward. But, I notice the OP hasn't been back recently so.......that's all I have to say at this point. 1917
 

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I had the same issues with my ppk. Magazine, Extractor, Mainspring. These are the area’s to correct. The problem is that the ppk doesnt slide the rim or the cartridge case behind the extractor. The chamber indicator gets stuck behind the case rather than out of the way. The indication of this is you will see the chamber indicator sticking out further when a loaded round is chambered. Magazines are your first culprit. Change mags first see if that helps. I changed the extractor second and that really helped eliminate the issue. I changed the main recoil spring to the older design the old longer spring. Too tight an extractor is main culprit along with magazine and shorter main spring. Bought my parts on line Numerich gun parts. No more issues. This is not a limp wristing problem its a tight tolerance problem. Let me add that in your pic’s it appears the indicator is the problem. Its the tight extractor which is holding the rim too tight for the round to slide up and push up the indicator. I hope this helps!
 
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