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After a month of searching...I finally found a brand new AD P99AS in OD/Black. I've been lookin for an 03 AS for a while and finally found one in Colorado. I had to drive 2 hours but it was worth it! I was lookin for a black at first but fell in love with the green as soon as i saw it.

I'm in the military and some of you guys know we soak our weapons with lube before firing and spend hours cleaning it afterwards. So...

Question: What and how much lube would you guys recommend before and after firing?
 

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Usually the weapons are shipped with enough oil....and the task then becomes cleaning some of it up.

Make sure the barrel is cleaned of any excess oil that might have been applied for shipping.

Gun Oil : Any good grade oil will do.........but I do recommend using Gunslick Graphite lubricant for the rail system. It will keep the rails lubricated for long term storage or CCW.

Stick with FMJ bullets until the barrel has seasoned a bit. The copper will hone the lands & grooves and smooth out the new barrel. I usually will fire 50 rounds..........stop......push a patch down the barrel........then another patch that is "lightly" oiled. Than fire another 50 rounds. This action will force the gun oil into the steel's pores.......and will cause your barrel to become very shinny and it will clean easier.

If you are in a habit of soaking your barrels.......remember this action will strip your barrel of any oil seasoning. I have never found a need to soak my barrels when properly broken in.

JF.
 

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any modern service pistol is designed to run in harsh conditions (i.e. no lube). not recommended, but they can do it.

that being said, any surfaces that contact other surfaces should be cleaned well and receive a very light coat of oil. even if you can't easily 'see' it, oil fills the pores in the metal and does it's job. i wipe contact surfaces clean after oiling with a very slightly oily patch. non-contact surfaces get oiled and wiped 'dry'.

any more than that will attract gunk, which can affect long-term reliability between cleanings and make cleaning more difficult due to the additional crap soaked up by the excess lubricant.

just my $.02 and worth what you paid for it. it works for me though.

frye
 

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Whatever you do don't use so much oil that it gets around the firing pin or firing pin hole or so much that it can splatter in there while cycling. You don't need a ton of oil on the firearm but allot is not going to hurt anything other than make a bit of a mess as long as you keep it away from the firring pin and don't oil so much it runs down the mag well and gets on primers.

Rockets Out......

(PS Any good Glock website has pictures of where to oil and really the Walther is close enough the same instruction apply blow by blow)
 

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Congratulations on the purchase of a fine pistol! If it was used, you should take extra care cleaning and examining the chamber and bore. Run some cleaner-soaked patches (I use Hoppes Elite / MPro-7) through the barrel and after a few minutes scrub with a nylon or bronze brush. Run a couple of clean patches through and repeat with more cleaner and more patches if necessary. If you have some lead remover, you might want to use some to see if the person who owned the pistol before you used a lot of lead rounds. I bought a used barrel once that had appeared to have alternating layers of copper and lead that were a pain to remove, but once it was clean, the pistol shot great groups. Make sure all of the copper or lead remover is flushed out, then run a final patch with a small amount of CLP or other protectant through.

ciadst
 
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