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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I received the new Lugas extractor yesterday. It took appx. two days to arrive.
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The parts arrive in a small plastic bag. New spring, new roll pin and extractor. The part looks well made with precise edges. There is no tapered outside edge as on the Walther version. The hook is much sharper than the Walther version.

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The roll pin is not stepped as the Walther pin is. My take on the original retaining/pivot pin is that the top 1/2 fits through the extractor body with little or no drag. It is properly installed from the bottom and pressed upward until the top is near the upper surface of the slide. I installed the part with the Walther pin. The Lugas roll pin seems it would spread the hole in the sinc slide or more likely simply drive the thin metal out ahead of the pin's edge. The Walther pin fits the Lugas extractor in the same manner as the Walther extractor. So, in order to not damage the slide I used the Walther stepped pin.

The spring has more coils and is much stiffer than that stock spring. My only comment regarding this is that while the stiffer spring presses the nose of the extractor in with more force it might also cause it to drag with more force across the edge of the chamber at the extractor cut. Will this damage the thin steel edge on some pistols, will the tip of the extractor hook become worn???? I don't know. This will take some testing and careful inspection.


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I lined up an original extractor on the right, a revised Walther one in the center and the new Lugas on the left. It appears the Lugas tip does reach a bit further rearward than the Walther versions.


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With a CCI round sitting on the breech face the tip does not quire reach the rim. It is a bit hard to take photos of the rim sitting on the breech face exactly as it would when chambered because the extractor presses the round off center slightly.....no problem if you have three or four hands. I couldn't hold the round and operate the camera.


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Another view of the extractor and the gap between the face and the rim of a CCI cartridge.

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As you can see the open face of the breech block doesn't really hold a round in place very securely. Nothing can be done about this and it is one reason the last spent case typically ejects in a different manner than earlier cases.

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The part seems well made, it does appear to reach a bit further rearward than the VQ or Walther revised part. In extracting live rounds the part flings the cartridges out of the ejection port just like a Ruger would. Even the last round is sent spinning out to the right. With the Walther revised extractor, on my pistol the part will pull a round out of the chamber 1/4" and then release the round, failing to fully extract and eject it. Perhaps the stiffer spring and sharper edge has something to do with this. Likely the tighter tolerance is also a positive.

Oddly, while firing CCI Green and RemGoldens the CCI ammo spent cases flipped out about 3' with the last case flying close to my right shoulder. The RemGoldens are far more powerful and flew out with a pretty consistent trajectory. Almost 90 degrees out to the side. It will take a lot more shooting to fully understand and see what is going on. I can also make some videos. But the part seems well made, fits as it should and cost $15. It is clearly better at extracting live rounds on one of my pistols. Again, I did not use the supplied roll pin....I will have another look at that as well and see if as the pin is driven through the hole in the extractor.....is it reduced in diameter to match the upper Walther pin.

When removing the pin I suggest it be carefully tapped or pressed downward and out the bottom of the extractor. The extractor does not come with any literature. I expect I will tap on an area of the rear leg to determine if I can peen the tip a bit more rearward. You cannot do that on the revised Walther extractor....it is too hard and will break. The original could be easily peened. Is the Lugas better than the VQ version.....perhaps, I can't remember and I think my Son has the only VQ I ever had. 1917
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I will be taking a careful look at the interaction of the Lugas tip against the extractor cut. I am seeing some really shiny steel on the chamber wall at the cut. I think I will cycle the slide 200 times manually and then have a very careful and magnified look at the Lugas extractor tip to see if I see steel shavings on it. The sharper tip and the stronger spring might be pressing the tip in a bit too hard. I don't know, time will tell but it won't be good to see steel shavings on the tip. The hardness of the extractoris H600 I believe they call it. I don't know how to assess that. I think it is a stainless steel hardness that might apply to the external material. Any metallurgists on board to explain this. Rockwell hardness is about 42 from my understanding but I don't now the significance of these numbers. 1917
 

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The Lugas extractor certainly looks better made than the Walther version. I'm so glad that my P22 works well so I don't need to screw around with this.
 
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