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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen,
I recently acquired a Walther model PP in about 98%. The pistol shows very slight blue wear at the muzzel end of the slide and has absolutely no scratches anywhere on the frame or slide. The barrel shroud is stamped with the numbers 66, followed by half of a stag antler, followed by an eagle over the letter N; the eagle and N lay horizontaly. " Made in West Germany " is stamped on the left side of the frame under the magazine release button. The serial number is 21xxxA, again followed by the eagle over an N. While my pistol and revolver interests have never included Walthers, I bought this pistol for ccw and plan to have it engraved. As I know nothing about Walther pistols, my question is, am I going to do something here to a pistol that has value beyond being a carry/shooter ? Any in put will be greatly appreciated, and my thanks in advance.
Michael
 

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Has anyone seen ..........?:D
Welcome to the forum.

Your Walther was produced in 1966.
It may not cycle JHPs well as it was chambered over fourty years ago.
Keep it in 98% condition (not in a holster):eek: and it will grow in value over time.;)

Russell
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Has anyone seen ..........?:D
Welcome to the forum.

Your Walther was produced in 1966.
It may not cycle JHPs well as it was chambered over fourty years ago.
Keep it in 98% condition (not in a holster):eek: and it will grow in value over time.;)

Russell
Russel,
Thanks for the info and reply. The pistol was purchased in 1968 by a friend and kept unfired in his desk in a soft case untill a few months ago. I will give thought to returning it unfired to its box and keeping it as a safe queen. Thanks again,
Michael
 

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Has anyone seen ..........?:D
Welcome to the forum.
Russell

Good One:D , that was from Porky's?

I would never engrave a PP in that good of condition. New PP's had a retail price close to 1000 bucks, now they are cheaper because of the used police imports that have come in. But if it was purchased new in 68 and not been fired much It will be worth much much more in its original condition. Carrying in a holster will wear the blueing off quickly.
 

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... and in addition I just want to remark that the half stag
antler ist the inspection shooting mark of the 'Department of Ballistics'
in Ulm. Here in germany we have 7 Departments of Ballistics
and each individual gun must go through some initial shoots
(with overloaded ammunition) to pass the test. Ulm in Baden-Wuerttemberg
is one of the 7 departments. The eagle over N indicates that
the gun has successfully passed the initial shoots and the antler stuff shows
where the test has been done.
 

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... and in addition I just want to remark that the half stag
antler ist the inspection shooting mark of the 'Department of Ballistics'
in Ulm. Here in germany we have 7 Departments of Ballistics
and each individual gun must go through some initial shoots
(with overloaded ammunition) to pass the test. Ulm in Baden-Wuerttemberg
is one of the 7 departments. The eagle over N indicates that
the gun has successfully passed the initial shoots and the antler stuff shows
where the test has been done.
Inspiron. Thank you for the information I was looking for.
Michael
 

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Shoot it, 007!!

First of all, I'm totally in the pro-shoot and carry if you want to camp. If you want to see a prestine PP or PPK, go to the factory and see some of their show pieces. These things were made to be shot...to be used...not rubbed with a diaper. Lame. On the 007 note...That's right...any real James Bond fan knows that the gun M hands to Bond to replace his Beretta is a PP not a PPK. "What?!?!" you say!!! That's right...for all of those that get all uppity about their 7.65mm PPKs being the real Bond gun (and it is based on indentification in a few of the books and a couple of movies) they should know that fiction both in books and on screen is not perfect. They (the movie producers) accidentally gave Bond a PP not a PPK in Dr. NO. After that, of course, we usually see our hero carrying a PPK (like he was supposed to). A few times its identified as a 7.65mm (as Fleming said it was) but we don't always know that's what it was...heck, it could have been a .380 (9mm kurz) on some of his missions, like mine!!!....If I were Bond, that's what I would have demanded over the .32!!! :)
 

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First of all, I'm totally in the pro-shoot and carry if you want to camp. If you want to see a prestine PP or PPK, go to the factory and see some of their show pieces. These things were made to be shot...to be used...not rubbed with a diaper. Lame.
Yes,yes,yes...........

I find myself thinking the same thing every time I get the itch to go to the range. So I pack up my precious Lugers, Mauser, and Walthers. When I get there I begin the bitter-sweet process of trying to decide which of these guns (that cost me anywhere from $900 to $2000 apiece) that I am willing to chance breaking a numbered part (thereby cutting its value approximately in half after repairs). So I shoot a few magazines in this one or that and then go to my M1911-A1 and P99 defense pistols for earnest target practice. I want my collectable guns to be fully functional but I usually chicken out before putting fifty rounds through any of them. I just changed recoil springs in the HSc, PP, and PPK so I will be testing them next trip.

Russell
 

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Yes,yes,yes...........

I find myself thinking the same thing every time I get the itch to go to the range. So I pack up my precious Lugers, Mauser, and Walthers. When I get there I begin the bitter-sweet process of trying to decide which of these guns (that cost me anywhere from $900 to $2000 apiece) that I am willing to chance breaking a numbered part (thereby cutting its value approximately in half after repairs). So I shoot a few magazines in this one or that and then go to my M1911-A1 and P99 defense pistols for earnest target practice. I want my collectable guns to be fully functional but I usually chicken out before putting fifty rounds through any of them. I just changed recoil springs in the HSc, PP, and PPK so I will be testing them next trip.

Russell
I understand your point, completely, and appreciate it. Also, I'm not suggesting that if it's someone's hobby to collect guns and keep them in the best condition possible that that is not a valid interest and worth pursuing...I, in fact, think it's cool. I guess it boils down to ones perception of an investment vs. a collectible vs. a rarer article that you still are willing to use. I don't see my LNIB (soon to not be) '68 PPK as the same type of collectible as lets say a signed Joe Dimaggio rookie card in mint condition. That's something you don't handle outside of its plastic sleeve and try never to bend, expose to too much light, etc. Nor is my PPK like a Monet or a flawless blue diamond that you protect and preserve to your utmost. Sure, my PPK is somewhat rare, especially in its condition, but I see it as being luckily preserved for me and for my use. Unlike those other examples, the gun was meant to be used, and in that process, worn. I have no intention of ever selling it, so who cares if a part breaks and its value is depreciated. Its only depreciated in the mind of that would-be buyer who will never be a buyer of my gun! Plus, in its mint state, how many people am I really ever going to show it to (in person) in my lifetime (that will appreciate it)??? A handful at best. So I'm shooting mine and not looking back, and I suggest Mr. New PP owner does the same.
 

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That is funny! Now I am going out to buy some diapers for my Walther, thanks for the idea, what a girly man I must be:D .
I would never call any Walther-lover, or any gun fanatic for that matter due to possible risk of serious bodily damage, a girly man!! :D In fact, my fellow supporters of the Second Amendment are some of the last real men in the U.S. Seriously, though, not wanting to shoot a gun that you consider a collectible or investment makes perfect sense to me. I shoot all of my guns and that's the purpose for which I bought all of them. I do not collect guns or have any that I consider so collectible as to be reluctantly shootable. I would not have bought my new '68 PPK if I knew I wasn't going to shoot it. That's not my purpose for gun ownership...and that's clearly just my personal take on the subject. More power to you Gun collectors, investors, etc.
 

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I am with you on that also, I shoot all my collectable guns a little. I had a Model 5 once that a UMC round bulged the barrel and now it is a nice conversation piece.:mad: But that is the risk you take. There is an excitement about shooting a piece of history, knowing that it may of been in action somewhere.
 

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Yellow box. My smith told me I must of had a squib load that got by me, but I am pretty sure it must of been a double charge. He could be right and I might not of noticed the squib if it had enough power to eject the case, so I hate to blame the ammo for sure. Either way, you cannot replace the barrel of a Model 5 because it is machined as one piece with the frame.
 
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