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Several years ago I bought a non-matching 1936 S/42 Mauser P.08. I've really enjoyed shooting it but the grips have always been a problem. If you saw them in a photo they would look normal but as soon as you picked it up you would notice that most of the checkering had been pressed into the wood leaving the surface slick.

I ordered a set of replacement Nill grips through their US importer MacTecSales. Cost was around $120. They were slightly oversized so I had to gently reshape them with some 120 grit sandpaper. It took about a half hour to get both pieces just right. They feel great and I don't think they look too out of place on my 83 year old pistol.
 

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Nothing like a Luger under the sun. The toggle action was a blind alley. (Okay, okay, you in the back, the Maxim gun used it).
It also has a trigger mechanism for which Rube Goldberg held the original patent.
But they are neat, and you guys have a couple nice examples. I've a presentable 'matching number save for the magazine' example, but have always hesitated to put fresh grips on it.

Not sure I want to get in for over a C-note.
Moon
 

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Nothing like a Luger under the sun. The toggle action was a blind alley. (Okay, okay, you in the back, the Maxim gun used it).
It also has a trigger mechanism for which Rube Goldberg held the original patent.
But they are neat, and you guys have a couple nice examples. I've a presentable 'matching number save for the magazine' example, but have always hesitated to put fresh grips on it.

Not sure I want to get in for over a C-note.
Moon
My only remaining Luger is a Vopo Luger with a Vopo replacement barrel from the former Czechoslovakia, it has an excellent trigger pull, works reliable and is accurate.

I had a few Lugers and found big differences in trigger characteristics, despite matching numbers. I have changed triggers bars around and found that that is what makes the difference.

The Luger is also the only pistol that comes to my mind that will fire with the slide alone, after disassembly.
 

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...The Luger is also the only pistol that comes to my mind that will fire with the slide alone, after disassembly.

Okay, you lost me there.
As regards the trigger, it would seem there's lots of opportunity, with all the twists, turns, and changes of direction, to massage it into something better. That sharply angled grip feels elegant in the hand.
Moon
 

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Okay, you lost me there.
As regards the trigger, it would seem there's lots of opportunity, with all the twists, turns, and changes of direction, to massage it into something better. That sharply angled grip feels elegant in the hand.
Moon
Moon,

if you take the slide off with the striker cocked, you can set the gun off by just pressing on the trigger bar. Check how the safety works, it locks the trigger bar.

The German police had their guns retrofitted with the Schiwysicherung to address this.
 
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