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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've been looking for one of these for a year now and finally found one on the Florida Gun Trader. Made in August of 1943, it was probably taken from a dead Jap officer ;). On a serious note this is the gun responsible for Sturm Ruger. Ruger got a couple of 14s post war and they were the inspiration for his famed .22.
 

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For a country famed for it's love of beauty ,symmetry, and balance ,that is one butt ugly pistole the looks of which only it's designer could love . I guess someone in dire need of something to defend themselves with might find it beautiful though . A friend of mine growing up father brought one back from Iwo ,had a full rig , pistol ,holster, belt ,magazine pouch and brownie belt . He captured it from a dead man who no longer was in need of it . It was empty when he found it and took the rest of the war to find ammo for it ,the saying to the last bullet and the last man they took literally . If you had been searching for it am glad you found it and fulfilled your quest , I am also glad Ruger refined the lines and symmetry and produced a more aesthetically pleasing pistole to look at . Ayb
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well I guess I won't try to fix you up with her sister the Type 94.;)

Unlike years past when people were selling single rounds for $20 new ammo is now available at $1. I picked up a couple of boxes and brought it in to work. Between myself and my coworkers we ran through a couple of mags. No issues, VERY accurate, light recoil and an all around pleasure to shoot.
 

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... On a serious note this is the gun responsible for Sturm Ruger. Ruger got a couple of 14s post war and they were the inspiration for his famed .22.
An internet fairy tale if I ever heard one.

If William B. Ruger was inspired by anything other than WWII German sheet-metal technology, it was by the shape of a Luger.

M
 

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Sorry, Mikey, that one is a fact. The Ruger Standard is functionally identical to the Baby Nambu and only borrows its looks from the Luger. And it's been known that Old Bill designed his pistol after the Baby Nambu before there even was an internet.
 

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His own words good enough for you?

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Not really. I also have that book (a very good one, incidentally; Larry Wilson's best, in my opinion), and read the same passage. I didn't swallow it then, and don't believe it now.

Bill Ruger, like some other self-made men, was imperious and given to dissembling about his achievements. It would be a mistake to take everything he said at face value. If he was inspired by the Baby Nambu, it was mostly by its "cute" size.

Only in that very loose sense can the Ruger Standard Model be regarded as a "copy" of the Baby Nambu. The two guns are completely dissimilar in function, design and construction.

The Nambu is locked-breech with a pivoting locking block, the Ruger pure blowback. The Nambu is of conventional milled construction throughout; the Ruger frame is stamped from sheet-metal halves welded together in a then-novel fashion pioneered only a decade earlier by the Germans in WWII. Actually that was the really noteworthy feature of Ruger's design that allowed it to be priced cheaper than competing Colts and High Standards, and made it a marketing success. That had nothing to do with the Nambu.

Moreover, the Nambu is field stripped by sliding down the entire trigger guard assembly. The trigger guard is an integral part of the frame of the Ruger. The Ruger is disassembled via a removable backstrap (which is solid in the Nambu).

About the only similarity between them, apart from grip shape and petite size, is the fact that the cylindrical bolt reciprocates inside a tubular upper receiver into which the barrel is fixed.

M
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I can/t believe I'm disagreeing with MGMike but to me there is clear evidence the type 14 was the inspiration for the MkI.
 

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You are free to disagree with me; indeed I encourage it. I have been wrong many times, as my wife reminds me.

But often the truth is not found in what someone says. The guns themselves are the best evidence, and if one compares them they are completely different.

If Ruger had been truly "inspired" by the Nambu, the Standard Model would be striker-fired.

M
 

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I can/t believe I'm disagreeing with MGMike but to me there is clear evidence the type 14 was the inspiration for the MkI.
I think Jimbo nailed it. Inspiration doesn’t mean a 100% copy of the design. The shape and size are similar and the tubular receiver, and you have Ruger’s word... It does not mean he had to copy it piece by piece. In fact, knowing Ruger and his fertile mind, I’m not shocked at all that he might have started at the Nambu and ended up a fair distance away, with only vestiges of the starting point left...
 

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The Luger, of course ;)
 

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The Luger, of course ;)

Well, interestingly enough, Ian Hogg writes in Pistols of the World that the Nambu Type A outwardly resembles the Luger P08 pistol but functionally is more similar to the Mauser C96, and I can see how he came to THAT conclusion.
 
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